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FCC News Brief - April 28, 2016

By Gladys Delgadillo 1 day ago

FCC News Brief

Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

April 28, 2016

 

Jenny Staletovich reports for the Miami Herald – “In a notice to Florida Power & Light officials, the Department of Environmental Protection gave the utility 21 days to provide any information about how the 40-year-old canals have seeped into the Biscayne aquifer and enter negotiations to come up with a clean-up plan. If the two sides fail to agree on a fix, the agency may come up with its own measures in 60 days.” Read Florida cites FPL for Turkey Point cooling canal violations

Michael Sole writes for the Tallahassee Democrat – “For decades, FPL enjoyed a productive, cooperative relationship with its rock mining neighbor, Mr. Torcise and his company, Atlantic Civil Incorporated. Lately, however, Mr. Torcise has been anything but neighborly, rarely missing an opportunity to publicly attack FPL.” Read FPL addressing saltwater problems

Naples Daily News reports – “Florida tallied the year’s 16th roadkill endangered panther…bringing the 2016 death toll to more than half of last year’s record of 30 panthers…So far this year, FWC biologists have found 18 dead panthers overall, most of them in Collier and Lee counties.” Read Florida panther killed by vehicle on Interstate 75 in Estero

Jensen Werley reports for The Jacksonville Business Journal – “The St. Johns Riverkeeper is resubmitting its petition against dredging this week, following the Department of Environmental Protection requesting more details.” Read Jaxport, St. Johns Riverkeeper prepare for legal battle over dredging

The Ocala Star Banner Editorial Board writes – “Ever since Jerry Dodd purchased 279 acres on a mile-long stretch of the Rainbow River with plans to build hundreds of homes and a commercial center, the development’s fate has taken…twists and turns…Last week a state appeals court ruled that the comprehensive plan process that led to a settlement between the city of Dunnellon and Dodd that would have allowed the development to move forward was improper and must be done all over again…The construction of 300-plus homes and commercial businesses on the banks of the already stressed Rainbow River is just bad for the river…Yet, there may be a solution that could make all sides…satisfied. The Springs Restoration Council of the Southwest Florida Water Management District…has recommended the…district acquire the Rainbow River Ranch property…We applaud SWFWMD’s decision to try and buy Dodd’s 1.3 miles of riverfront property.” Read Twists and turns on the Rainbow

TC Palm Editorial Board writes – “House Resolution 4793 (the Everglades Land Acquisition Act) – would earmark $500 million for the U.S. Interior Department to purchase land south of Lake O…Moving water south from Lake O is the ultimate solution to the problem…Currently, there are no co-sponsors for the land-buying bill. Treasure Coast Newspapers’ Editorial Board urges the members of our federal legislative delegation – including Sens. Bill Nelson…and Marco Rubio…and Reps. Patrick Murphy…and Tom Rooney…to sign on and support this important legislation.” Read Federal lawmakers must step up, support land-buying bill to help end Lake O discharges

Stacie Greco writes for the Gainesville Sun – “Please collect leaves and use them around existing plants as mulch, add them to compost piles for future use, or place them in yard waste bags or reusable trash cans for curbside collection.” Read Leaves clog storm drains

Bill Ritter writes for The Wall Street Journal – “The truth is that despite the large-scale, global impact of climate change, it is the states and cities, not Washington D.C., that have most of the legal powers to prevent global warming by helping the United States transition to cleaner energy.” Read Why States and Cities Must Lead the Way on Climate Change

 

 

From Our Readers

The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

 



Job Postings

The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


Petitions

Save the Econlockhatchee River!

Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

Paynes Prairie in danger

Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

 

Making Connections

Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

 

Upcoming Environmental Events

April 30, 2:00 pm – Attend Friends of Lullwater Lake’s first meeting since registering officially as a non-profit organization. The meeting will take place in the grassy common area at Lullwater Condominiums (301 Lullwater Drive, Panama City Beach). Bring a lawn chair to sit on. Meet the board members and plan next steps.

April 30, 2:00 pm – Attend “Exploring Wild Florida,” a presentation by Doug Alderson (author and Blueways Pioneer), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

April 30, 4:00 pm – Attend Lost Springs Meet and Greet in Palatka and share your photos and experiences of the wonders made visible by the recent drawdown of the Ocklawaha River. Special presentations will be given by Matt Keene, Margaret Tolbert, and Mark Long. Please RSVP to Tracy@fladefenders.org or call (352) 475- 1119.

May 3, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs hydrogeology: the Florida Aquifer, groundwater recharge, and springs flows. For more information, click here.

May 11, 12:00 pm – Listen to “Ethics in Leadership Development for the Planner,” a 1000 Friends of Florida webinar covering the ethics requirements of the American Institute of Certified planners and how these interface with Florida’s ethics laws. Emphasis will be placed on ethics as it relates to leadership and common ethics traps. For more information and to register, click here.

May 14, 2:00 pm – Attend “Long Leaf Pine- Restoring Fred George Basin’s ecosystem,” a presentation by Tom Ostertag (FWC Imperiled Species Biologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

 

 

 

 

 

Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition.org

About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - April 27, 2016

By Gladys Delgadillo 2 days ago

FCC News Brief

Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

April 27, 2016

 

Dinah Voyles Pulver reports for The Daytona Beach News-Journal – “City leaders celebrated when the regional water management agency bought more than 900 acres…in 1999 to help protect Gemini Springs and DeBary Bayou….Now the city wants to acquire 102 acres of that land from the St. Johns River Water Management District to build a…regional stormwater pond surrounded by single and multi-family homes, the centerpiece of a larger project to attract and promote economic development around the SunRail station…To help win the district’s approval, the city has hired the Orlando consulting firm of John Miklos, who also happens to be chairman of the water district’s board…Mayor Clint Johnson said the city never would pay out that kind of money without assurances the deal would be approved by the district… ‘This is the worst case of transparency that I can recall in years,’ said former County Councilwoman Pay Northey, who was on the council when the county agreed to take over ownership of the land from the water district three years ago, with the stipulation that it remain in conservation. That hasn’t happened…Current and former county officials…question the use of public land to support development and the potential impacts to neighboring Gemini Springs, an environmental preserve with a pair of springs.” Read SunRail vs. Scenery: DeBary land deal draws fire

Thomas St. Myer reports for the Pensacola News Journal – “Kaitlin Goode, an FWC bear biologist…requested (Santa Rosa) commissioners consider an ordinance that requires citizens to secure their trash cans with retro fit clips or to wait until the morning of pick up to put their trash cans on the curb…Florida Legislature appropriated $500,000 to assist with bear management, with 60 percent of the dollars earmarked for Santa Rosa and 13 other counties with the highest bear population to pay for bear-resistant containers and so forth…The law requires the counties adopt an ordinance to be eligible for those funds. Seminole County already adopted an ordinance…Goode said research indicates the number of bears in the county would probably decrease after about three weeks, if the county commissioners put an ordinance in place and its citizens abide by the law.” Read Ordinance answer for bear reduction in Santa Rosa?

Edith M. Lederer and Cara Anna report for the Associated Press – “The historic agreement on climate change marked a…milestone…with a record 175 countries signing on to it on opening day…‘The world is in a race against time,’ U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said in his opening speech. ‘The era of consumption without consequences is over.’…The agreement will enter into force once 55 countries representing at least 55 percent of global emissions have formally joined it, a process initially expected to take until 2020. China, the world’s top carbon emitter, announced it would ‘finalize domestic procedures’ to ratify the agreement before the G-20 summit in China in September. The United States, the world’s second-largest emitter, reiterated its intention to ratify this year, as did Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau…Leonardo Dicaprio, a U.N. messenger of peace and climate activist, captured the feelings of many when he said: ‘We can congratulate each other today, but it will mean absolutely nothing if the world’s leaders gathered here go home and do nothing…The world is now watching. You will either be lauded by future generations or vilified by them.’” Read 175 states sign landmark Paris deal on climate change

Mike Vasilinda reports for Capitol News Service – “The land and water conservation amendment on the 2014 ballot got more votes than any statewide elected official. It was a rebuke of lawmakers who slashed environment funding during the recession, then didn’t restore it when the economy improved…Florida Conservation Voters has created a web site detailing how all of the 900 million that’s supposed to go to land and water conservation is being spent this year. Included is the entire cost of fighting forest fires in Florida, the cost of enforcing boating regulations on the water. The conservation money is even paying all of the salaries of the people who run all of the agencies that have anything to do with conservation. That’s all cash that came from general revenue before.” Read Amendment One Funds Still Being Diverted

Tom Palmer writes for The Ledger – “Florida’s wild landscape contains more than 500 species of plants that are considered endangered, threatened or at risk from commercial exploitation…The bad news is that there’s nothing to stop a private landowner from bulldozing any rare or endangered plant in the way of his development plan. That’s because under the Endangered Species Act and other laws designed to preserve our natural heritage, endangered plants don’t receive the same level of protection as endangered animals. Protection under state law is limited, too.” Read Florida’s endangered plants struggle for protection

Jake Martin reports for The St. Augustine Record – “Gov. Rick Scott and the Cabinent [was] asked to buy 5,236 acres of timber land in St. Johns County, to be used as a conservation easement…The land, part of the…St. Johns River Blueway Florida Forever tract, runs along the eastern shore of the St. Johns River…It is adjacent to the Watson Island State Forest…The land is ranked ninth on the state’s Florida Forever Climate Change Lands list…” Read State to consider $6M timber land purchase in St. Johns County

David Fleshler reports for the Sun Sentinel – “South Florida’s corals are turning white and contracting fatal diseases in what’s being called an unprecedented die-off across the region’s reefs. Off Hollywood, scientists witnessed the collapse of a minivan-sized coral colony that had started growing more than three centuries ago, when the Spanish ruled the peninsula. As recently as September, live coral tissue covered 90 percent of the colony’s surface, making it among the oldest living things in the state. By December it was almost completely dead…The bleaching and disease has struck around the world, with scientists blaming global warming, as well as unusual weather events…Last week scientists announced that 93 percent of the Great Barrier Reef in Australia had been affected.” Read South Florida corals dying in ‘unprecedented’ bleaching and disease

Isadora Rangel reports for the TC Palm – “Two of the 12 people running to replace U.S. Rep. Patrick Murphy accepted political contributions from the sugar industry, a controversial move in a congressional district that’s ground zero for Lake Okeechobee discharges. The donations represent a small portion of the total raised by Army veteran Brian Mast and sugar farmer Rick Roth, both Republicans…The troubled estuary is arguably the top local issue in the race for District 19, which covers Martin County – the most affected by discharges on Florida’s east coast- as well as St. Lucie and northern Palm Beach counties. Knowing whether a candidate has taken sugar money might not be a deal breaker, as their record on environmental issues also should be a factor, but ‘it matters,’ said environmentalist Maggy Hurchalla, a former Martin County commissioner and water advocate. Hurchalla said it also matters to know whether candidates support buying land…south of the lake to move its water into the Everglades.” Read Sugar sweetens campaigns of Brian Mast, Rick Roth in race to replace Patrick Murphy

 

 

From Our Readers

The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

 



Job Postings

The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


Petitions

Save the Econlockhatchee River!

Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

Paynes Prairie in danger

Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

 

Making Connections

Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

 

Upcoming Environmental Events

April 30, 2:00 pm – Attend Friends of Lullwater Lake’s first meeting since registering officially as a non-profit organization. The meeting will take place in the grassy common area at Lullwater Condominiums (301 Lullwater Drive, Panama City Beach). Bring a lawn chair to sit on. Meet the board members and plan next steps.

April 30, 2:00 pm – Attend “Exploring Wild Florida,” a presentation by Doug Alderson (author and Blueways Pioneer), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

April 30, 4:00 pm – Attend Lost Springs Meet and Greet in Palatka and share your photos and experiences of the wonders made visible by the recent drawdown of the Ocklawaha River. Special presentations will be given by Matt Keene, Margaret Tolbert, and Mark Long. Please RSVP to Tracy@fladefenders.org or call (352) 475- 1119.

May 3, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs hydrogeology: the Florida Aquifer, groundwater recharge, and springs flows. For more information, click here.

May 11, 12:00 pm – Listen to “Ethics in Leadership Development for the Planner,” a 1000 Friends of Florida webinar covering the ethics requirements of the American Institute of Certified planners and how these interface with Florida’s ethics laws. Emphasis will be placed on ethics as it relates to leadership and common ethics traps. For more information and to register, click here.

May 14, 2:00 pm – Attend “Long Leaf Pine- Restoring Fred George Basin’s ecosystem,” a presentation by Tom Ostertag (FWC Imperiled Species Biologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

 

 

 

 

 

Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition.org

About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - April 26, 2016

By Gladys Delgadillo 4 days ago

FCC News Brief

Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

April 26, 2016

 

Jim Waymer and Dave Berman report for Florida Today – “Scientists for decades have pointed to stormwater runoff, septic tanks and muck as among the Indian River Lagoon’s main problems, and have suggested potential solutions. Have elected officials been acting on those suggestions? To answer that question, FLORIDA TODAY looked at how county commissioners and state legislators voted on key issues since 2010, when a controversial septic tank bill went to a vote. FLORIDA TODAY also has assigned…grades based on how they voted.” Read Lawmakers have mixed record on Indian River Lagoon issues

Kevin Spear reports for the Orlando Sentinel – “Any hope that South Florida’s endangered panthers will eventually spread hundreds of miles north to as far as the Orlando area and beyond may hinge on a proposal for immense development near Naples. A growth plan…spans important panther territory and is nearly as big as some counties in the state. Amid that expanse, construction of subdivisions and business areas would claim 45,000 acres. The remaining 107,000 acres would be set aside for protection of panthers and other imperiled wildlife, a trade-off triggering sharply divided reaction from environmentalists…[T]he Conservancy of Southwest Florida [is concerned that there] would be ripples of additional development triggered by construction within the 45,000 acres. ‘Our primary objection is not that development is going to go there, or even how much development, but it’s the location on what’s considered primary panther habitat,’ said Rob Moher, the group’s chief executive officer. Brad Cornell, policy associate with Audubon Florida and the Audubon of the Western Everglades chapter, supports the development proposal…Cornell said the 45,000 acres are poor or marginal for panther habitat and the remaining 107,000 acres will be improved and set aside for permanent protection.” Read South Florida developers target panther land

Valarie Harring reports for the Cape Coral Daily Breeze – “The Babcock Ranch development...is a complete reversal of how Florida has seen development progress for the last century and a half…Although environmentalists strongly urged the land buy as an enhancement to preservation land already owned, the purchase stalled due to price. Kitson then came in with a plan that would allow the state to buy about 73,000 acres of the most sensitive areas for preservation, leaving about 18,000 for the town Kitson will now build…More than 90 percent of the acres to be developed already have been impacted by agriculture-related use such as ranching, farming and rock mining...Of the acreage retained, half has been earmarked for greenways, parks and lakes. Four hundred and forty-three acres have been dedicated to a massive…solar power plant that will be capable of generating enough power to energize the entire town during daylight hours...Natural water flow is to be restored as will be some 70 acres of historic wetlands while filter marshes will be used to protect water quality. Seventy-five acres of farmland will be returned to panther habitat. ”Read Babcock ‘grand reveal’ promises a ‘town of the future’

Tamar Hallerman reports for AJC.com – “Former Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio…took to the Senate floor…to blast the way water is managed in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) and Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa (ACT) river basins. Florida and Alabama have long alleged that Georgia takes out too much water for metro Atlanta at the expense of its neighbors… ‘The bottom line is that the status quo is only working for one state,’ [Rubio] said. Rubio teamed up with…Bill Nelson…and Alabama’s two GOP senators to push for a vote on an amendment to a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers spending bill that’s currently being considered on the Senate floor. It would require the governors of Georgia, Florida and Alabama to agree on water allocations in the two basins before the Army Corps can formally do so. The provision would cut off funds for the Army Corps to carry out the reallocation until the states come up with a deal…This isn’t the first time Rubio has dipped his toe in the water wars…” Read Marco Rubio joins revived water battle against Georgia on Capitol Hill

Mary Orndorff Troyan reports for the Montgomery Advertiser – “[S]enators from Alabama and Florida teamed up against Georgia to protect downstream water levels in shared river basins. Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., has added a provision to a federal spending bill that would require the Justice Department to audit how often in the last 11 years a community withdrew more water from a reservoir than a contract allowed. Separately, Sen. Marco Rubio…wants to block the use of federal funds for any effort to reallocate water resources without consent from all three governors.” ReadSens. Shelby, Rubio resume water war with Georgia

The Orlando Sentinel shares – “For all their beauty; their economic value; and their power to restore us, educate us, and make us healthier – far too many of our parks and monuments are threatened. Toxic uranium mines threaten the doorstep of the Grand Canyon. The oil and gas industry has proposed to drill and conduct seismic testing right outside the Everglades. And some in Congress are pushing to sell or transfer our parks to the highest bidder, and prevent new parks from being created…As Congress considers appropriations over the next several weeks, we’re urging at least $1 billion in funding to address the substantial maintenance backlog to protect our treasured parks, trails, and recreation areas for the next 100 years.” Read The Interview: National parks under pressure

Kevin Wadlow reports for Keys Info Net – “Florida’s largest utility must do more to contain a plume of saltwater seen as a possible threat to the Florida Keys’ primary source of drinking water, Monroe County commissioners said… ‘You’ve been talking about this for a number of years without timely action,’ Commissioner David Rice told FPL representatives at the commissioner’s meeting in Marathon. ‘FPL has lost a certain amount of public trust.’” Read Keys County Commission to FPL: Quit threatening our water supply with nuclear-plant discharge

Tom Rooney writes for News Press – “The 2016 South Florida Environmental report, which was prepared by people much smarter than me at the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the South Florida Water Management District, concluded that total phosphorus in agricultural runoff from land south of Lake O was reduced by 79 percent in 2015, three times the amount required by state law, and phosphorus flowing from north of the Lake was reduced by 26 percent…As a constitutional and fiscal conservative, I disagree with advocates of a sweeping, incredibly costly federal land grab that disrupts my constituents’ ability to willingly enter into contracts to sell or lease their land…I know that there are projects the Corps underfunded or didn’t fund, but unfortunately the earmark ban prevents all members from increasing the budgets for specific projects, like the dike, which are urgently needed. The Appropriations Committee has developed creative solutions within the confines of this rule to address the Administration’s funding shortfalls by providing additional money for ‘flood control,’ ‘dam safety’ and ‘ecosystem restoration’ projects, generally, in our Energy and Water bill.” Read Real progress made in reducing water pollutants

 

From Our Readers

The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

 



Job Postings

The Center for Earth Jurisprudence at Barry University School of Law in Orlando is seeking a Director. Application deadline is April 18, 2016.

The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


Petitions

Save the Econlockhatchee River!

Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

Paynes Prairie in danger

Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

Making Connections

Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

 

Upcoming Environmental Events

April 30, 2:00 pm – Attend Friends of Lullwater Lake’s first meeting since registering officially as a non-profit organization. The meeting will take place in the grassy common area at Lullwater Condominiums (301 Lullwater Drive, Panama City Beach). Bring a lawn chair to sit on. Meet the board members and plan next steps.

April 30, 2:00 pm – Attend “Exploring Wild Florida,” a presentation by Doug Alderson (author and Blueways Pioneer), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW,Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

April 30, 4:00 pm – Attend Lost Springs Meet and Greet in Palatka and share your photos and experiences of the wonders made visible by the recent drawdown of the Ocklawaha River. Special presentations will be given by Matt Keene, Margaret Tolbert, and Mark Long. Please RSVP toTracy@fladefenders.org or call (352) 475- 1119.

May 3, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springsevery first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs hydrogeology: the Florida Aquifer, groundwater recharge, and springs flows. For more information, click here.

May 11, 12:00 pm – Listen to “Ethics in Leadership Development for the Planner,” a 1000 Friends of Florida webinar covering the ethics requirements of the American Institute of Certified planners and how these interface with Florida’s ethics laws. Emphasis will be placed on ethics as it relates to leadership and common ethics traps. For more information and to register, click here.

May 14, 2:00 pm – Attend “Long Leaf Pine- Restoring Fred George Basin’s ecosystem,” a presentation by Tom Ostertag (FWC Imperiled Species Biologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 ornkost@tampabay.rr.com.

May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or emailinfo@fnps.org.

June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

 

 

 

 

Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition.org

About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - April 25, 2016

By Gladys Delgadillo 4 days ago

FCC News Brief

Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

April 25, 2016

 

Andrew Gillum writes for the Tallahassee Democrat – “Florida is “ground zero” for climate change in North America…I’ve joined with mayors from across Florida to demand that our state leaders take action…The best way to mitigate…impacts is by embracing a clean energy plan that includes at least 50 percent clean energy by 2030….Nowhere is a clean energy economy more needed than in Florida, where communities are facing significant future loss of their current tax base because of rising sea levels. Public health, agricultural production and property values in Florida are at risk…We owe it to our children to confront the climate crisis head-on and build a cleaner, stronger, more sustainable country.” Read Florida cities united on climate change concern

Jerry Iannelli reports for the Broward Palm Beach New Times – “[T]he (fracking) bill died…Since then, a PR rep for a group called “vets4Energy” has sent New Times a handful of emails, asking us to publish a pro-fracking op-ed written by Vets4Engery’s Florida cochair, Dennis Freytes. The story accuses Florida’s environmentalists of fear-mongering…But a quick fact-finding mission shows “Vets4Energy” is effectively a public-relations front for the American Petrolium Institute, the oil industry’s largest trade association, PR firm, and lobbying wing. And despite how obvious the group’s oil ties are, at least four major Florida newspapers…appear to have run op-eds from the group without any mention of its funding sources…Vets4Energy appears to be a clear example of “astroturfing” – that is, the practice of masking lobbying groups as well-meaning “grassroots activists” to gain the public’s trust and hijack space in the nation’s newspapers. “Astroturf” groups are a growing –and frightening- section of the U.S. lobbying industry: Famously, a now-defunct group called the “Save Our Species Alliance” campaigned to gut the Endangered Species Act ten years ago. Watchdog groups later found out the alliance was deeply tied to the forest-products…industry.” Read Pro-Fracking Group “Vets4Energy” Is a Front for the Oil Industry

Robert Knight writes for The Gainesville Sun – “The Florida Springs Institute enlists highly qualified technical advisors to provide independent review of the models used by the state to manage groundwater resources. Those experts have concerns about the poor quality of the models used for evaluation, review and issuance of water-use permits by the water management districts (WMDs) throughout Florida. Based on information provided by the WMDs, it is apparent that many of the existing groundwater flow models have not been thoroughly reviewed, validated or used with adequate caution…Gross over-estimates of groundwater availability appears to be the norm. Model estimates of spring flow reductions due to groundwater extractions are strikingly different from actual measured changes in spring flows. For example, the St. Johns River WMD’s best models estimate that Silver Springs flow has been reduced by about 5 percent by groundwater pumping while actual average flow reductions are greater than 30 percent…A…recent groundwater modeling effort was initiated…to better assess the cross-boundary effects of massive groundwater withdrawals in northeast Florida and southeast Georgia…[T]he North Florida Southeast Georgia model, includes the same flawed framework as the previous WMD groundwater flow models…On behalf of all Florida citizens who wish to have a sustainable groundwater future, Florida Springs Institute advocates for a full and truly independent review of that model before it is adopted for issuing the next round of groundwater permits.” Read Flawed models used to permit groundwater pumping

Cape Coral Daily Breeze reports – “The City of Cape Coral received a notice of intent to sue letter Thursday from the Florida Clean Water Network…The letter alleges that since the city was allowed to remove the Ceitus boat lift barrier in 2008 certain actions to mitigate the loss of pollution treatment provided by the barrier have not occurred. Consequently, the water quality in the area is in steep decline with no relief in sight from any level of government oversight in violation of the city’s Clean Water Act permit from the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System…Under the Clean Water Act, the City has 60 days to respond to the allegations and correct the permit violations. If this is not done, the suit will be filed in federal court.” Read Florida Clean Water Network notices city of intent to file pollution lawsuit

Frank Bumb and Chad Gillis report for News Press – “[The Florida Clean Water Network] filed a notice of intent to sue the City of Cape Coral over federal Clean Water Act violations they say are polluting Matlacha Pass. The [group] says…they want a development moratorium until the issue is remedied. ‘When you have an impairment (measured pollution) you cannot allow development to continue,’ said Linda Young, director of the Clean Water Network.” Read Florida Clean Water Network files notice of intent to sue Cape Coral

Steve Waters reports for the Sun Sentinel – “The benefits of the emergency measure that took effect Feb. 15 to allow excess water in the Everglades water conservation area to flow south…into Everglades National Park and Florida Bay have exceeded expectations…Getting water out of the WCAs means more needed fresh water for the park and the bay, less stress on animal and plant life in the conservation areas, reduced amounts of water that need to be released from Lake Okeechobee into the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee rivers and better fishing in all those affected areas.” Read Everglades flowage easement yields benefits

Sean Kinane reports for WMNF – “WMNF News interviewed David Hollander, a professor of chemical oceanography at the University of South Florida College of Marine Science. He was chief scientist on several of the first studies of the BP disaster… ‘[O]il…ultimately sedimented down on the floor of the northern Gulf of Mexico, on the continental shelf and on the slope.’…” Read Update on Gulf ecosystem 6 years after BP oil disaster

U.S. Forest Service’s Southern Research Station shares – “A warmer climate may lead to higher growth and productivity on U.S. national forests and grasslands, but university and U.S. Forest Service researchers say this could reduce quantities of fresh water flowing from most of these lands, even with increases in precipitation.” Read More Productive U.S. National Forests and Grasslands Could Yield Less Water in a Future Climate

 

 

From Our Readers

The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

 



Job Postings

The Center for Earth Jurisprudence at Barry University School of Law in Orlando is seeking a Director. Application deadline is April 18, 2016.

The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


Petitions

Save the Econlockhatchee River!

Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

Paynes Prairie in danger

Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

 

Making Connections

Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

If your nonprofit organization would like to be a vendor FOR FREE at Earth Day Pensacola 2016, scheduled to be held on April 23rd from 10-4 at Bayview Park, contact Mary Gutierrez at mary.earthethics@cox.net.

 

Upcoming Environmental Events

April 30, 2:00 pm – Attend Friends of Lullwater Lake’s first meeting since registering officially as a non-profit organization. The meeting will take place in the grassy common area at Lullwater Condominiums (301 Lullwater Drive, Panama City Beach). Bring a lawn chair to sit on. Meet the board members and plan next steps.

April 30, 2:00 pm – Attend “Exploring Wild Florida,” a presentation by Doug Alderson (author and Blueways Pioneer), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

April 30, 4:00 pm – Attend Lost Springs Meet and Greet in Palatka and share your photos and experiences of the wonders made visible by the recent drawdown of the Ocklawaha River. Special presentations will be given by Matt Keene, Margaret Tolbert, and Mark Long. Please RSVP to Tracy@fladefenders.org or call (352) 475- 1119.

May 3, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs hydrogeology: the Florida Aquifer, groundwater recharge, and springs flows. For more information, click here.

May 11, 12:00 pm – Listen to “Ethics in Leadership Development for the Planner,” a 1000 Friends of Florida webinar covering the ethics requirements of the American Institute of Certified planners and how these interface with Florida’s ethics laws. Emphasis will be placed on ethics as it relates to leadership and common ethics traps. For more information and to register, click here.

May 14, 2:00 pm – Attend “Long Leaf Pine- Restoring Fred George Basin’s ecosystem,” a presentation by Tom Ostertag (FWC Imperiled Species Biologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

 

 

 

 

 

Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition.org

About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

Charter Members

FOUNDER and CHAIRMAN
Bob Graham, Former Governor of Florida and U.S. Senator

VICE CHAIRMEN
Nathaniel  Pryor Reed, Former Assistant Secretary of the Interior, Former Chairman SFWMD, Founder and Chairman Emeritus 1000 Friends of Florida 
And
Com. Lee Constantine, Seminole County Commissioner and Former State Senator, State Representative and Mayor of Altamonte Springs

AUDUBON FLORIDA

Eric Draper, Executive Director

CONSERVANCY OF SOUTHWEST FLORIDA
Rob Moher, President
Jennifer Hecker, 
Director of Natural Resource Policy

FLORIDA WILDLIFE FEDERATION
Manley Fuller, President
Martha Musgrove, Board Member
Preston Robertson, General Counsel and VP for Conservation

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS
Pam Goodman, President

1000 FRIENDS OF FLORIDA

Victoria Tschinkel
, Board Member and former Secretary of Department of Environmental Regulation
Ryan Smart, President

Charles Pattison, Policy Director 
Roy Rogers, Board Member

SIERRA CLUB
Craig Diamond
Frank Jackalone, Senior Organizing Manager

ST. JOHNS RIVERKEEPER
Lisa Rinaman, Riverkeeper
Jimmy Orth
, Executive Director

THE NATURE CONSERVANCY
John Robert Middlemas, Chair
Janet Bowman, Director of Legislative Policy and Strategy

TRUST FOR PUBLIC LAND
Greg Chelius, Florida State Director
Will Abberger, Director Conservation Finance

INDIVIDUALS
Lester Abberger 
John Finlayson, Agriculturist, Jefferson County, former Chairman SRWMD
Bill Kerr, Environmental Consultant, Brevard County, former Chairman SJRWMD
Gary Kuhl, Former Executive Director, SWFWMD 
Jay Landers, Former Secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection, Former Director of the Department of Natural Resources

Allan Milledge, Former Chairman ELMs Committee and SFWMD
Auley Rowell, Agriculturist, Taylor County, former Chairman of SRWMD 
Earl Starnes, Former Dade County Commissioner, Former Director of the Division of State Planning
Sonny Vergara, Former Executive Director, SWFWMD and SJRWMD
Estus Whitfield, Former Principal Environmental Advisor to 5 Florida Governors

Mailing Address


Florida Conservation Coalition

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