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FCC News Brief - December 3, 2016

By Gladys Delgadillo 1 day ago

FCC News Brief

The best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds for Floridians
 

December 3, 2016


 
 
Ron Littlepage writes for the Florida Times Union – “Developers in Florida have a long history of being in the business of making money now and not considering the impact on the future…We could get serious about conservation and ban St. Augustine grass and homeowner association rules that require water use. We could have growth management laws that say no to such developments as the one being planned for the Deseret Ranch that will create a new city of 500,000 people in Central Florida. But none of those things will happen until there is a new governor and new legislators…who understand like previous people who occupied those offices did that Florida’s future depends on water. And those replacements must give more than lip service to that idea because it’s the truth and will sometimes require painful actions. For now, talk, talk. Water, water everywhere but not a drop to drink.” Read There are ways to help solve Florida’s water crisis -  but is there the will to pursue them?

Matt Blitz reports for Popular Mechanics – “[C]oal-powered….stations are a common enemy [to] the 2015 Paris Agreement…But ten Florida power stations…are inadvertently saving the manatee. What happens when they shut down?...[When] water temperatures take a nosedive,…manatees need to find warm water fast or risk fatal cold shock… ‘[Manatees] are very memory-driven...[and] will remember and go where warm water is...show[ing] up year after year, waiting,’ says Garrett (a marine mammal biologist with the FWC)…Because of their long-running reliance on the power plants, the manatees who harbor at Big Bend probably will be unaware of other warm water spots nearby. In addition, humans have destroyed or blocked other natural warm water locations, like springs or thermal basins, that once were manatee refuges…Ideas include asking federal and state agencies to buy up natural springs for manatee habitats, removing human-made dams, restricting human activity near natural springs during winter months, and even experimenting with moving manatees to other warm water spots in the state…[I]t took 50 years for the manatees to become reliant on power stations, and it will take just as long to wean them off of it. Changes need to happen now and can't wait for these plants to close down.Read The future of the Florida Manatee depends on a decades-old coal-burning power station
                                                                                      Dan Chapman reports for The Atlantic Journal-Constitution – “The water wars trial pitting Florida against Georgia…wrapped up Thursday…Lancaster said he will promptly, perhaps by Christmas, issue his ruling…Lancaster will accept post-trial briefs, or summaries, from the two states before finalizing a decision. Attorneys may then have another opportunity to challenge his ruling before the master submits his decision to the Supreme Court…Congress could ultimately weigh in on the special master’s ruling by challenging the corps’ water-sharing plan. If…the special master orders Georgia, Florida and Alabama to create a regionwide water-sharing “compact,” then legislators could again play a role…Romuald Lipcius, an oyster expert at the College of William and Mary, said there was no evidence ‘that low river flows…caused the baywide collapse of the oyster population.’ He added, instead, that ‘unsustainable harvest’ measures…were largely to blame. Earlier in the day two University of Florida scientists who extensively studied the oyster’s collapse claimed that their research was questioned and their jobs threatened when their findings didn’t jibe with the state’s legal strategy against Georgia.Read Georgia, Florida await decision as water war trial concludes

Ryan Smart writes for The Gainesville Sun – “From the Florida Keys to the Panhandle, 1000 Friends of Florida advocates for building better communities. In our opinion, one of the most exciting planning efforts underway anywhere in Florida is happening right here in Gainesville: the University of Florida’s Strategic Development Plan.Read UF plan provides model for Florida

Zach Murdock reports for the Herald-Tribune – “The Florida environmental science professor best known as “Dr. Beach” agrees with Siesta Key residents that a controversial plan to dredge Big Pass could have detrimental effects on Siesta’s iconic beaches…Siesta groups, businesses and residents fear such a major change to the channel – which has never been dredged – could lead to faster erosion along the key…Siesta Key groups…and the Sarasota County Commission asked the Army Corps…to undertake a more rigorous and comprehensive study of the plan, known as an environmental impact statement, before state officials give final consideration to a permit for the dredging. This week the Army Corps denied that request, defending its environmental assessment and the model…The Florida Department of Environmental Protection is reviewing a city and Army Corps application for a joint coastal permit for the dredging and has until Dec. 27 to issue a notice of decision. Read ‘Dr. Beach’ sides with Siesta Key on Big Pass dredging

Stuart Korfhage reports for The St. Augustine Record – “Over the summer, the North Florida Land Trust released its list of more than 100,000 acres in the region that it identified as being the most critically important to preserve… This week, NFLT acquired the first 206 acres of that goal when it completed a purchase for land with significant frontage on Six Mile Creek directly off the St. Johns River.Read North Florida Land Trust completes deal to acquire 206 acres along Six Mile Creek

Aliki Moncrief writes for the Naples Daily News – “[O]ur enormous potential to be a top solar-powered state -- combined with the recent groundswell of public support for a clean-energy future -- means we have a promising path forward. The voters have spoken, loudly. Now our lawmakers must heed their call to action…[C]all or write to your state representative and senator and tell them you expect them to support legislation promoting customer-owned and community solar in Florida. To fully implement the solar incentives laid out in Amendment 4, legislative action is needed.Read Shifting Florida’s energy policy toward sun

Camila Domonoske reports for NPR – “An annual study released by the Brazilian government estimates that the rate of deforestation in the Amazon has increased by 29 percent over last year…INPE acknowledged the increase but noted that "the current rate represents a decrease of 71%, when compared with 2004." That was the year the government implemented a policy designed to curb deforestation…But the rate now detected is the highest for any year since 2008…The Brazilian newspaper Estadão reports…:‘…The policy director of Greenpeace, Marcio Astrini, says among the causes of the increased deforestation were actions taken by the federal government between 2012 and 2015, such as the waiving of fines for illegal deforestation, the abandonment of protected areas…and the announcement, which he calls 'shameful,' that the government doesn't plan to completely stop illegal deforestation until the year 2030.’… Estadão also notes that the rise in deforestation is raising concerns about Brazil's ability to meet its commitments as part of the international Paris Agreement on combating climate change…Reuters reported that a lack of funding has hampered the organization that's tasked with stopping illegal logging efforts.Read Deforestation of the Amazon Up 29 Percent from Last Year, Study Finds

 

 

 

 

From Our Readers

The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

 


Petitions

URGENT: Reschedule the Lake Pickett North Development Hearing!

Prevent the Loss of One of Florida’s Most Popular National Wildlife Refuges

Tell Congress to Stop Sabal Trail

Stop New Phosphate Strip Mining in Florida

Stop the Division of Herky Huffman/Bull Creek WMA 2016

Now or Neverglades Declaration

Ask the SFWMD to deny the permit for the Crosstown Parkway that cuts through TWO State Preserves

Save the Econlockhatchee River!

Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

Paynes Prairie in danger

Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

Help Florida Become a “Pay for Shade” state

 

Upcoming Environmental Events

 

December 6, 12:00 pm – Join the Florida Springs Institute for Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center, 99 NW 1st Avenue, High Springs, FL 32643. December’s lecture is on Springs Chemistry. For more information, click here.

December 9, 2:30 PM – City of St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman and the University of South Florida St. Petersburg will make important announcements around clean energy and sustainability on the steps of St. Petersburg City Hall.

December 9, 7:00 PM –  Join Suncoast Sierra Club for refreshments, live music, and art in celebration of St. Petersburg sustainability. For more information and to register click here.

December 14, 12:45 pm – Come learn about irrigation improvements for homeowners in The Villages. The meeting will take place in the Belvedere Library. For more information and to RSVP, email resourcewisdom@gmail.com.

January 13 –  Attend the 26th Annual Southwest Florida Water Resources Conference in Fort Myers. For more information and to register, click here.

January 28, 9:30 AM - Attend the 1st Nature's Spirit Conference hosted by the Pagan Environmental Alliance and the First Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Palm Beaches to discuss how science, belief in nature, and activism can tap into greater community involvement. For more information, click here.

 

 

Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free). Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed. Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 70 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

For more information on the FCC visit www . floridaconservationcoalition . org

 

FCC News Brief - December 1, 2016

By Gladys Delgadillo 3 days ago

FCC News Brief


The best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds for Floridians
 


December 1, 2016

 
 
 

Robert Knight writes for The Gainesville Sun – “Not only is water clarity in Kings Bay almost entirely gone, so are the eelgrass and other native plants that historically covered the bottom of the bay…The latest insult to those who treasure Crystal River’s springs is the district’s draft plan to establish minimum flows…After 44 years of injurious delay and inaction, the water management district has somehow concluded that an additional 12 percent decline in flows at Kings Bay/Crystal River will not cause ‘significant harm.’…The U.S. Geological Survey, the most respected hydrological agency in the world, reported that [there has been]…a greater than 58 percent decline (in average spring flow from historical averages)…The only way to reverse the algae problems and restore water clarity in Kings Bay is to dial back groundwater pumping and fertilizer use throughout the Southwest Florida Water Management District…Let the district’s Governing Board know that you do not support the proposed minimum flow for Kings Bay/Crystal River and that you adamantly oppose their decision to further reduce spring flows.Read Make Crystal River clear again

The Associated Press reports – “The largest U.S. solar panel installer is moving into Florida’s residential market after the state’s voters last month rejected a utility-backed ballot measure that critics said would make going solar more expensive…In Florida,…the law allows only utility companies to sell power directly to consumers, so SolarCity has been slow to enter the state’s market even with its abundant sunshine.” Read Nation’s largest solar installer to open Florida facility

C.T. Bowen reports for the Tampa Bay Times – “Pasco is projected to get $12.7 million as a member of the 23-county Gulf Coast Consortium that is devising a state spending plan for the…federal trust fund to distribute the fines from BP stemming from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon…Pasco was required to send its recommended projects…and the contents and ranking of that list sparked substantial debate among county commissioners…Commissioner Mike Wells Jr. wanted a greater emphasis on stormwater drainage and lamented that two of the three highest-ranked projects by the county's advisory committee were artificial reefs… ‘This is not flood remediation money,' [County Attorney Jeffrey Steinsnyder] told the commission…Commissioner Kathryn Starkey questioned the Ranch Road park… ‘I don’t see how putting in basketball courts is helping our environment,’ she said.Read Pasco commission debates how to spend Restore Act dollars

Jeff Biggers writes for the New York Times – “Doomsday scenarios about the climate have abounded in the aftermath of the November election. But responsibility for effectively reining in carbon emissions also rests with business, and with the nation’s cities and states. Those are the battlegrounds. Worldwide, cities produce as much as 70 percent of greenhouse gas emissions…With or without significant federal support, reducing greenhouse gas emissions will require major private investment…and ambitious private-public initiatives from mayors and governors…California’s recent move to reduce its carbon emissions by 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030 is a hopeful shift that other cities and states should emulate. This would involve setting high benchmarks for developing green enterprise zones, renewable energy, cultivating food locally, restoring biodiversity, planting more trees and emphasizing walkability, low-carbon transportation and zero waste.Read Cities and states lead on climate change

Selima Hussain reports for the Sun Sentinel – “Jennifer Veilleux has…worked as a water security analyst for the U.S government…and she’s currently a geographer at Florida International University’s Institute of Water and Environment… She’s…building an international team of people -- consisting of scientists, lawyers, historians, Ph.D students and photographers -- to conduct a complete environmental assessment on the (Dakota Access) pipeline’s impact on the Missouri River water system…Energy Transfer Partners, the company behind the pipeline, was permitted to build the pipeline under state utility permits and the Nation Wide Permit 12, according to Veilleux. ‘This allows megaprojects to be dissected into bite sized chunks…so that the impact is minimized and not assessed as a collective impact," Veilleux said…Davidd Frankel, a Fort Lauderdale lawyer…has been traveling to and from Standing Rock to offer legal assistance to the “water protectors.”” Read How a South Florida scientist and lawyer are standing with Standing Rock

Anna Hirtenstein reports for Bloomberg – “A subsidiary of Bouygues SA has designed rugged solar panels, capable of withstanding the weight of an 18-wheeler truck, that they’re now building into road surfaces... ‘We wanted to find a second life for a road,’ said Philippe Harelle, the chief technology officer at Colas SA’s Wattway unit, owned by…Bouygues. ‘Solar farms use land that could otherwise be for agriculture, while the roads are free.’Read Solar-Panel roads to be built on four continents next year

A.G. Gancarski reports for Florida Politics – “Northeast Florida Senators Aaron Bean, Rob Bradley, Audrey Gibson, and Travis Hutson all have new committee assignments. Happily, for Northeast Florida, the first three listed will be in a position to have say over the upper house’s purse strings in the coming Session. Bean…will also sit on the Community Affairs…[committee]. Bradley likewise retains a presence on the Appropriations Committee, chairing the Subcommittee on the Environment and Natural Resources. He will be the vice-chair of the Committee on Environmental Protection and Conservation, befitting the mostly rural nature of his district…He will have input into water management districts, which could have a salutary impact on the interests of Jacksonville and Northeast Florida in the perpetual water wars over the St. Johns River.Read Northeast Florida Senators to feature heavily on Appropriations Committee

Keith Bradsher reports for the New York Times – “China…has called on the United States to recognize established science and to work with other countries to reduce dependence on dirty fuels like coal and oil…Even as it does so, China is scrambling to mine and burn more coal.” Read Despite climate change vow, China pushes to dig more coal

 
 


 

From Our Readers

The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

 


Petitions

URGENT: Reschedule the Lake Pickett North Development Hearing!

Prevent the Loss of One of Florida’s Most Popular National Wildlife Refuges

Tell Congress to Stop Sabal Trail

Stop New Phosphate Strip Mining in Florida

Stop the Division of Herky Huffman/Bull Creek WMA 2016

Now or Neverglades Declaration

Ask the SFWMD to deny the permit for the Crosstown Parkway that cuts through TWO State Preserves

Save the Econlockhatchee River!

Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

Paynes Prairie in danger

Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

Help Florida Become a “Pay for Shade” state

 

Upcoming Environmental Events

December 1-2 – Attend the rescheduled Florida Remediation Conference in Orlando. FRC includes 2 days of technical presentations on soil and groundwater cleanup, along with more than 80 industry product and services exhibitors. For more information, click here.

December 6, 12:00 pm – Join the Florida Springs Institute for Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center, 99 NW 1st Avenue, High Springs, FL 32643. December’s lecture is on Springs Chemistry. For more information, click here.

December 9, 2:30 PM – City of St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman and the University of South Florida St. Petersburg will make important announcements around clean energy and sustainability on the steps of St. Petersburg City Hall.

December 9, 7:00 PM –  Join Suncoast Sierra Club for refreshments, live music, and art in celebration of St. Petersburg sustainability. For more information and to register click here.

December 14, 12:45 pm – Come learn about irrigation improvements for homeowners in The Villages. The meeting will take place in the Belvedere Library. For more information and to RSVP, email resourcewisdom@gmail.com.

January 13 –  Attend the 26th Annual Southwest Florida Water Resources Conference in Fort Myers. For more information and to register, click here.

January 28, 9:30 AM - Attend the 1st Nature's Spirit Conference hosted by the Pagan Environmental Alliance and the First Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Palm Beaches to discuss how science, belief in nature, and activism can tap into greater community involvement. For more information, click here.

 

 

Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free). Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed. Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com. 

About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 70 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

For more information on the FCC visit www . floridaconservationcoalition . org

FCC News Brief - November 30, 2016

By Gladys Delgadillo 4 days ago

FCC News Brief

The best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds for Floridians 

November 30, 2016


 

Cindy Swirko reports for the Gainesville Sun – “The Ichetucknee and lower Santa Fe rivers have less water than they need to support the life in them…White Springs, once a thriving resort full of visitors… doesn’t have enough water to attract an otter. And the volume of water and other springs is in jeopardy, too – the aquifer isn’t bubbling up as much as it used to in some spots because it’s increasingly pumped out buy utilities, homeowners, businesses and agriculture…Trying to fill the conflicting needs of the ecosystems of springs, rivers and lakes with the needs of both the current and future populations for water is the basis of a proposal to govern water supplies through 2035. Officials with the Suwanee River and St. Johns River water management districts…believe added conservation measures and greater use of reclaimed water will lead to success…But environmental advocates, including Jim Gross, are not entirely buying it…Proposals in the plan to move water from one water body when its flow is high to recharge the aquifer or to a storage area for release when water levels are low is a shell game rather than a solution, he said…Much of the burden to meet the goals falls on residents and farmers to reduce water use. For customers of municipal utilities, a hammer could be higher water costs.” Read Florida districts develop plans to combat water crisis

The Tampa Bay Times Editorial Board writes – “[U]nless Florida make smarter use of its water, communities may face serious shortages, the loss of farmland and a slowdown in growth that could upend the states economy…The demand for water already is so intense that cities and counties have undertaken hugely expensive water development projects in recent years, with the Tampa bay area building a regional reservoir and a seawater desalination plant. Even with new conservation rules, the study predicts, the rush of new residents and sprawling suburbs will leave room for only modest savings in water. This presents a huge challenge for state and local leaders in Tampa Bay, and it underscores the need to continue to think and act regionally. The solutions — more compact development, land use policies that discourage sprawl, better protection of natural resources and water recharge areas — will all require better planning and coordination at the state and local levels. The development community could be a partner; it has awakened to the cost savings of building more efficient and sustainable projects. The resurgence of cities as places to work, play and live also creates an opportunity to save water through smarter urban design. The report…is a reminder of how the Florida Legislature wasted an opportunity this ear by passing a state water bill that was more about developing new water resources than conserving those that already exist.” Read Meeting Florida’s demand for more water 

Kristen M Clark reports for the Tampa Bay Times – “Senate President Joe Negron… announced his leadership team for the 2016– 18 term…a list that includes some expected appointments but also some surprises and a few snubs.” Read Florida Senate’s committee leaders for the 2016– 18 announced

NBC 6 reports - “Nearly 5 million customers in Florida are going to pay more for electricity in the coming year after state regulators voted…for a substantial rate hike…FPL had initially sought a $1.3 billion rate hike, but agreed to a smaller amount after reaching a settlement with several groups…Company officials say the extra money will help pay for improvements, including a new natural gas plant…Frank Jackalone, staff director for the Sierra Club’s Florida chapter, said the PSC had approved ‘a huge rate hike for unnecessary, climate disrupting, gas-burning power plants.’ State Sen. José Javier Rodriguez…also blasted the PSC for approving a deal for a monopoly that is ‘bad for consumers, bad for the market, bad for the environment and ultimately bad for our democracy.’”  Read Florida Power & Light Customers to Pay More in Coming Year

Brady Dennis reports for the Washington Post – “Pope Francis this week implored world leaders not to postpone the implementation of global environmental pacts…The pope’s remarks came during a gathering of scientists at the Vatican, at which he said there has “never been such a clear need for science” to guide human actions to safeguard the future of the planet… ‘I would say that it falls to scientists, who work free of political, economic or ideological interests, to develop a cultural model which can face the crisis of climatic change and its social consequences,’ he said…” Read Pope Francis: “Never been such a clear need for science” to protect the planet

JoAnn Adkins reports for FIU News – “Bottlenose dolphins in the Florida Coastal Everglades have higher concentrations of mercury than any other populations in the world.” Read Mercury contamination found in Everglades dolphins

CJ McCartney writes for the St. Augustine Record – “While resilient St. Augustine is getting back on track, our local wildlife, who has absolutely no insurance, is seeking new habitat too. Along with their homes being wiped out, their food sources vanished…Our wildlife needs us to step up to offer them a spot in our yards…It’s easy and fun to create a pocket wildlife garden…” Read Birds and wildlife are homeless too

Reagan McCarthy reports for WFSU – “Florida wildlife officials are…encouraging landowners to cut down on wildfires by forming “prescribed burn associations.”” Read Prescribed burn associations could save money, wildlife

 
 
 

 

 

 

From Our Readers

The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

 


Petitions

URGENT: Reschedule the Lake Pickett North Development Hearing!

Prevent the Loss of One of Florida’s Most Popular National Wildlife Refuges

Tell Congress to Stop Sabal Trail

Stop New Phosphate Strip Mining in Florida

Stop the Division of Herky Huffman/Bull Creek WMA 2016

Now or Neverglades Declaration

Ask the SFWMD to deny the permit for the Crosstown Parkway that cuts through TWO State Preserves

Save the Econlockhatchee River!

Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

Paynes Prairie in danger

Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

Help Florida Become a “Pay for Shade” state

 

Upcoming Environmental Events

September – November – Participate in The Great Suwannee River Basin Cleanup 2016. For more information and to sign up, click here.

December 1-2 – Attend the rescheduled Florida Remediation Conference in Orlando. FRC includes 2 days of technical presentations on soil and groundwater cleanup, along with more than 80 industry product and services exhibitors. For more information, click here.

December 6, 12:00 pm – Join the Florida Springs Institute for Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center, 99 NW 1st Avenue, High Springs, FL 32643. December’s lecture is on Springs Chemistry. For more information, click here.

December 9, 2:30 PM – City of St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman and the University of South Florida St. Petersburg will make important announcements around clean energy and sustainability on the steps of St. Petersburg City Hall.

December 9, 7:00 PM –  Join Suncoast Sierra Club for refreshments, live music, and art in celebration of St. Petersburg sustainability. For more information and to register click here.

December 14, 12:45 pm – Come learn about irrigation improvements for homeowners in The Villages. The meeting will take place in the Belvedere Library. For more information and to RSVP, email resourcewisdom@gmail.com.

January 13 –  Attend the 26th Annual Southwest Florida Water Resources Conference in Fort Myers. For more information and to register, click here.

 

 

 

Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free). Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed. Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 70 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

For more information on the FCC visit www . floridaconservationcoalition . org

 

FCC News Brief - November 29, 2016

By Gladys Delgadillo 5 days ago

FCC News Brief

The best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds for Floridians

November 29, 2016


 

 

Brad Rogers writes for the Ocala Star Banner - “Yeah, heard it all before in too many studies to count. Then comes Adam Putnam…with this admonition: ‘Water is Florida’s golden goose, and we must ensure that we have a reliable, abundant and clean supply of water now and for future generations…’ That from a guy who helped water down a massive water bill that started out strong until Putnam’s big business and big ag buddies got hold of it…Yet the Florida Legislature and…our local governing boards…refuse to implement new regulations. Regulations requiring, not just suggesting, water conservation efforts, from low-flow irrigation systems to Florida-Friendly landscaping to mandatory reclaimed water access. We get it - regulation is a dirty word. But out of water is far, far worse…[T]he people of Florida get it. They keep approving initiatives like Amendment One and Florida Forever…The problem is our elected officials listen to the special interests and their lobbyists…”  Read Something new, something old about Fla.’s water
 
Tom Palmer reports for News Chief – “1000 Friends of Florida has recently organized a series of webinars to advance a serious discussion about the choices residents and state and local officials should consider if Florida is going to have a sustainable water future…[T]he section of the region around Orlando that includes Polk county has nearly tapped out the aquifer…[A]ny good plan needs to keep in mind the environment’s water needs…Florida officials must seriously rethink the way they permit and plan development related water demand…[T]wo new concepts recommended…deserve consideration. One is establishing conservation goals, water budgets and water use monitoring strategies prior to the approval of new development. Another is updating the building code…to require indoor and outdoor water efficiency standards for new construction and major remodeling…[T]his is an addition to more familiar measures aimed at improving landscaping and irrigation practices…but with an emphasis on conducting more public outreach and doing more to professionalize irrigation contracting. In Polk county, it seems the recently formed Polk County Water Cooperative can play a role here.” Read Florida’s water shortage problem is not going to go away
 
Jim Ash reports for WFSU – “Senate President Joe Negron wants the state to build a $2.4 billion reservoir…despite House Speaker Richard Corcoran’s call for budget cuts…[T]here isn’t much in Speaker…Corcoran’s history to suggest there’s room for compromise…Corcoran wants to start cutting now to fill a major shortfall predicted for next year.” Read Negron: Austerity Budget has Room for a Reservoir
 
Susan Salisbury reports for the Palm Beach Post – “[T]he US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Army Corps of Engineers…issued a final environmental impact report on two nuclear units proposed south of Miami…Now [Citizens  Allied for Safe Energy] has asked for a chance to challenge that [report] in a petition filed…with the NRC. [The group] states…, ‘The impact of injecting toxic chemicals and…radwaste laden water from the reactors directly into the boulder zone was not fully evaluated in the EIS.’” Read Citizens group seeks hearing on Turkey Point 6 and 7 nuclear plans
 
Melissa Nelson Gabriel reports for the Pensacola News Journal – “A new land deal is designed to buffer Whiting Field Naval Air Station from new neighborhoods and businesses in fast-growing northern Santa Rosa County. The agreement…adds 626 acres to Blackwater State Forest…” Read New land deal win-win for Whiting, community
 
Jeremy Diamond reports for CNN – “President-elect Donald Trump conceded…there is ‘some connectivity’ between human activity and climate change and wavered on whether he would pull the United States out of international accords aimed at combating the phenomenon…” Read Trump admits ‘some connectivity’ between climate change and human activity
 
Evan Halper reports for the Los Angeles Times – “[F]ew things on Trump’s confrontational agenda put him more quickly on a collision course with the rest of the world, much of his own country and even some in his own party than his stated desire to abandon the fight against global warming…‘ Donald Trump will be about the only head of state who does not believe in climate science or the responsibility of his government to act,’ send Michael Brune, executive director of the Sierra Club…Major US trading partners that signed on to the nearly 200 nation accord reached in Paris… are already signaling that they will retaliate if the United States backs out, possibly by slapping environmental trade tarrifs on to some American products. Bailing on the deal could also increase the influence of China…Generous federal tax credits for wind and solar production have provided an economic boost to states red and blue alike. Republican Sen. Charles E Grassley of Iowa put Trump on notice, saying this year that only ‘over my dead body’ would Congress allow a repeal of the wind tax credits Trump has proposed eliminating.” Read Trump seems ready to fight the world on climate change. But he’s likely to meet resistance.
 
Thomas L. Friedman writes for the New York Times – “Doral will be your first (golf) course threatened by global warming, because parts of Miami are already flooding due to sea-level rise…A majority of immigrants flooding Europe today are not coming from Syria or Iraq. Three-quarters are from arid zones in central Africa, where the combination of climate change and runaway population growth are making small-scale farming unsustainable…You can’t ignore climate change and think you have an immigration policy…And as the climate physicist Joe Romm put it to me, do you really want to risk ‘going down in history as the man who killed the world’s last, best chance to avoid catastrophic warming?’…Hal Harvey…notes…, ‘…[A] clean future now costs less then a dirty one.’…Is your strategy to keep America addicted to coal and scuttle our lead in clean tech – which is destined to become the next great global export industry and is already spawning good blue-collar jobs -  so we can an import clean energy systems from India and China?” Read Donald Trump, Help Heal the Planet’s Climate Change Problem

 

 

 

From Our Readers

The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

 


Petitions

URGENT: Reschedule the Lake Pickett North Development Hearing!

Prevent the Loss of One of Florida’s Most Popular National Wildlife Refuges

Tell Congress to Stop Sabal Trail

Stop New Phosphate Strip Mining in Florida

Stop the Division of Herky Huffman/Bull Creek WMA 2016

Now or Neverglades Declaration

Ask the SFWMD to deny the permit for the Crosstown Parkway that cuts through TWO State Preserves

Save the Econlockhatchee River!

Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

Paynes Prairie in danger

Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

Help Florida Become a “Pay for Shade” state

 

Upcoming Environmental Events

September – November – Participate in The Great Suwannee River Basin Cleanup 2016. For more information and to sign up, click here.

December 1-2 – Attend the rescheduled Florida Remediation Conference in Orlando. FRC includes 2 days of technical presentations on soil and groundwater cleanup, along with more than 80 industry product and services exhibitors. For more information, click here.

December 6, 12:00 pm – Join the Florida Springs Institute for Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center, 99 NW 1st Avenue, High Springs, FL 32643. December’s lecture is on Springs Chemistry. For more information, click here.

December 9, 2:30 PM – City of St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman and the University of South Florida St. Petersburg will make important announcements around clean energy and sustainability on the steps of St. Petersburg City Hall.

December 9, 7:00 PM –  Join Suncoast Sierra Club for refreshments, live music, and art in celebration of St. Petersburg sustainability. For more information and to register click here.

December 14, 12:45 pm – Come learn about irrigation improvements for homeowners in The Villages. The meeting will take place in the Belvedere Library. For more information and to RSVP, email resourcewisdom@gmail.com.

 

 

 

 

Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you. 

We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free). Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed. Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 70 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

For more information on the FCC visit www . floridaconservationcoalition . org

Charter Members

FOUNDER and CHAIRMAN
Bob Graham, Former Governor of Florida and U.S. Senator

VICE CHAIRMEN
Nathaniel  Pryor Reed, Former Assistant Secretary of the Interior, Former Chairman SFWMD, Founder and Chairman Emeritus 1000 Friends of Florida 
And
Com. Lee Constantine, Seminole County Commissioner and Former State Senator, State Representative and Mayor of Altamonte Springs

AUDUBON FLORIDA

Eric Draper, Executive Director

CONSERVANCY OF SOUTHWEST FLORIDA
Rob Moher, President
Jennifer Hecker, 
Director of Natural Resource Policy

FLORIDA WILDLIFE FEDERATION
Manley Fuller, President
Martha Musgrove, Board Member
Preston Robertson, General Counsel and VP for Conservation

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS
Pam Goodman, President

1000 FRIENDS OF FLORIDA

Victoria Tschinkel
, Board Member and former Secretary of Department of Environmental Regulation
Ryan Smart, President

Charles Pattison, Policy Director 
Roy Rogers, Board Member

SIERRA CLUB
Craig Diamond
Frank Jackalone, Senior Organizing Manager

ST. JOHNS RIVERKEEPER
Lisa Rinaman, Riverkeeper
Jimmy Orth
, Executive Director

THE NATURE CONSERVANCY
John Robert Middlemas, Chair
Janet Bowman, Director of Legislative Policy and Strategy

TRUST FOR PUBLIC LAND
Greg Chelius, Florida State Director
Will Abberger, Director Conservation Finance

INDIVIDUALS
Lester Abberger 
John Finlayson, Agriculturist, Jefferson County, former Chairman SRWMD
Bill Kerr, Environmental Consultant, Brevard County, former Chairman SJRWMD
Gary Kuhl, Former Executive Director, SWFWMD 
Jay Landers, Former Secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection, Former Director of the Department of Natural Resources

Allan Milledge, Former Chairman ELMs Committee and SFWMD
Auley Rowell, Agriculturist, Taylor County, former Chairman of SRWMD 
Earl Starnes, Former Dade County Commissioner, Former Director of the Division of State Planning
Sonny Vergara, Former Executive Director, SWFWMD and SJRWMD
Estus Whitfield, Former Principal Environmental Advisor to 5 Florida Governors

Mailing Address


Florida Conservation Coalition

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