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FCC News Brief - February 9, 2016

By Gladys Delgadillo 5 hours ago

FCC News Brief

Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

February 9, 2016

 

 

Bob Graham writes for the Panama City News Herald – “The Apalachicola River and floodplain, estuary and bay will clearly be adversely affected by the action proposed in the DEIS. Impacts of the proposed action are described in the letter by Dan Tonsmeire, Apalachicola Riverkeeper…During droughts over the past decade, particularly in 2012, the river and floodplain, estuary, and bay suffered tremendously as a result of the Corps operation of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee- Flint (ACF) project, which favored upstream users and denied sufficient river flow to sustain the resources downstream in Florida…The DEIS is inadequate; it does not meet the requirements of NEPA and CEQ.” Read Letter: Army actions will adversely affect Apalach waterways

The Gainesville Sun Editorial Board writes – “The assault on Florida’s park and conservation lands continues…as a new bill introduced under the guise of improving management of state lands proposes using Amendment 1 money for massive water transfer projects and allowing landowners with property adjacent to state-owned lands to buy those state lands in exchange for not developing their existing properties. The legislation – HB 1075 and its companion, SB 1290- seems to be a special-interest solution in search of a public-policy problem…Another part of the bill would change the wording of existing law and allow state lands to be used for conservation or recreational purposes. The change in wording is significant because current law specifies the purpose for which state lands are acquired. Under the proposed change, environmental advocates argue it would potentially open critical conservation and park lands to be converted to recreational uses, such as golf courses- a proposal Gov. Rick Scott floated a few years back before public outcry forced him to back down…Sen. Charlie Dean…can stop this attack on our treasured state parks and conservation lands by refusing to bring it before his panel. We urge Dean to stop this madness and let Florida’s nationally recognized park system remain such and let Amendment 1 do what the voters intended.” Read Another assault on our parks

Gale Dickert writes for the Tallahassee Democrat – “There is no reason to compromise Florida’s scare water supplies to help Big Oil frack…Voters should ask senators why they continue to ignore their constituency and vote for a bill not in Florida’s best interest… ‘It’s all about the money,’ Rep. Slosberg kept saying during a House debate, just before a whopping majority caved to Big Oil, voting in favor of HB 191 on fracking. Some, like Rep. Beshears, had the moral courage to vote no; most did not. Even as representatives yelled ‘yes’ to fracking, resolutions to ban it poured in from Florida counties; now more than 54 percent of Floridians want a ban…The easiest way to stop this train wreck is for Sen. Tom Lee, a smart and fair minded legislator, to shelve this bad bill, giving it the same treatment the bills to ban fracking were given. Tell your senators to listen to their constituents and focus on the huge challenge of restoring Florida’s crippled water supply, rather than voting in more polluting industry.” Read Legislators lack the courage to vote against fracking

Jeff Burlew reports for the Tallahassee Democrat – “Industry backed bills that would create regulations around fracking in Florida may have sailed through the House, but they’re facing more scrutiny, if not outright opposition, in the Senate. And it’s not just coming from Democrats…Sen. Darren Soto…said the legislation has stalled in the Senate because of ‘serious questions’ he and other senators have about the impact fracking could have on Florida’s aquifer, the source of the state’s drinking water supply, and the preemption of local decision making.” Read Fracking bills face headwinds in the Senate

The Star reports – “Experts still don’t understand quite how [fibropapillomatosis] spreads (among endangered sea turtles), or what causes it, though some research has pointed to agricultural runoff, pollution and global warming. As the population of green sea turtles rebounds in and around the Florida Keys, cases of fibropapillomatosis have exploded too…Green sea turtles were first listed as endangered species in 1976, but are now nesting in record numbers- 28,000 nests counted last year in Florida, up from fewer than 500 decades ago. Their status may be changed from ‘endangered’ to merely ‘threatened’ as early as March. While conservationists celebrate these successes, they also lament that the animals’ environment is increasingly polluted and hot, as the oceans absorb most of the warmth from human-driven climate change.” Read Sea turtles with tumors fill Florida hospital

Orlando Sentinel Editorial Board writes – “Brevard County wants to bury its garbage in a dump close to the St. Johns River, a potential drinking-water source for millions of Floridians…Brevard County needs to reverse course. If not, the other government agencies with a say in this plan- and a shared responsibility for stewardship of the area’s vital natural resources- need to stop it. There are modern garbage-disposal methods that minimize environmental and health risks…The tract is near an important rookery and is populated by a variety of wildlife, including crested caracaras, a threatened species of raptors, and bald eagles. Brevard County would excavate the land, cut down trees, fill nearly 200 acres of wetlands and pule up mounds of refuse…Although the county would create new conservation areas to replace what was destroyed, man-made nature often doesn’t work as well as the real thing.” Read Reject Brevard landfill by St. Johns

Bruch Ritchie reports for Politico Florida – “A proposed constitutional amendment backed by utilities is misleading and could force solar energy users to pay more for service from utilities, opponents said in briefs filed this week with the Florida Supreme Court…[T]he opponents also pointed to a Miami Herald report that some who signed petitions for the utility-backed amendment thought they were supporting another measure proposed by environmentalists and Floridians for Solar Choice. ‘The proposed solar amendment has already succeeded in confusing petitioners,’ attorneys for Floridians for Solar Choice wrote in their answer brief.” Read In court briefs, critics argue utility-backed amendment limits solar choice

Deirdra Funcheon reports for Broward Palm Beach New Times – “Over the years, coastal cities have periodically carried out beach renourishment projects- often to the detriment of marine life, say environmentalists…This type of project is largely self-regulated by the contractor…Porter, a property manager and underwater photographer, says that divers are fighting back by collecting images and data that they hope will halt beach renourishment the next time it is proposed…All these beach renourishment projects are futile anyway, she says. ‘If we’re dealing with sea level rise, you can dump all the sand you want – it’s going to wash away. We understand there are buildings that need to be protected, but we need to find a more sustainable solution. The $55 million that they’re spending to extend these beaches- they should put that money in investing in a permanent solution.” Read Divers Protest Beach Renourishment Project in Broward

 

 

 

 

 

From Our Readers

The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.



Job Postings

The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

Tall Timbers Research Station & Land Conservancy is seeking a Red Hills Awareness Program Manager


Petitions

Paynes Prairie in danger

Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U.S.A. from Development

 

Making Connections

Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

If your nonprofit organization would like to be a vendor FOR FREE at Earth Day Pensacola 2016, scheduled to be held on April 23rd from 10-4 at Bayview Park, contact Mary Gutierrez at mary.earthethics@cox.net.

 

Upcoming Environmental Events

February 9, 12:00 pm – Participate in Center for Earth Jurisprudence’s webinar, “Rights of Nature & Community Rights: What are they? Are they being implemented?” To register (48 hours in advance) and for more information, contact Sister Pat Siemen at psiemen@barry.edu.

February 11-13 – Attend the Public Interest Environmental Conference at the University of Florida College of Law in Gainesville. “Five Oceans, One Earth” is the 2016 topic. Find more information or register for the conference here.

February 13 – Participate in Save Our Parks, Statewide Day of Action. The Day of Action will include rallies, marches, and other events advocating against private, non-conservation uses in public lands including hunting, cattle grazing, timber harvesting, oil drilling, and more. Click here for more information.

February 13, 10:00 am – Attend the 23rd Party in the Park, the Treasure Coast’s first and foremost environmental festival, at Ft Piere Inlet State Park in Ft Pierce. The festival is free and includes food, activities for children and adults, and entertainment by Flint Blade.

February 15, 1:00 pm – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Nature Coast Unitarian Universalist Church in Citrus Springs. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

February 20, 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM – Attend the Orlando Wetlands Festival at Fort Christmas Historical Park in Christmas, FL for guided bird-watching excursions, native plant identification hikes, wilderness hikes, photo hikes, children’s activities, hay and bus rides, and more. Find more info here or call Orlando Wetlands Park at (407) 568- 1706.

February 20, 1:00 pm – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Lakes Region Library in Inverness. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

February 28, 1:30pm, Attend Amphibians & Seasonal Ponds Nature Walk with Dr. Betsie Rothermel, Director of the Herpetology Program at Archbold Biological Station, 123 Main Drive, Venus. Dr. Rothermel will give a lecture and take participants on a short hike to view nearby seasonal ponds. Meet at the Learning Center. All ages are welcome. Wear clothes and shoes appropriate for hiking in a wet environment. Children and adults are welcome. For more information, contact education@archbold-station.org or call 863-465-2571 x233.

February 29, 7:00 pm – Attend Water Voices: “Up & Down with the Floridan Aquifer” at the Wilson S. Rivers Library and Media Center at Florida Gateway College in Lake City. Geologist Jim Gross will present on the structure of the Floridan aquifer; on the connections between the aquifer, springs, drinking water, public health, and the economy; and on long-term trends in aquifer levels and pollution. For more information, call Lu Merritt at (386) 454- 0415.

March 1 – Participate in No Meat March. Take the pledge to go meat-free for 31 days and enjoy the support of an online community with many resources. Find more information here.

March 5, 10:00 am – Join the Florida Wildflower Foundation for an interactive edible plant walk at PEAR Park in Leesburg. You will get to taste, touch and smell some of the native plants growing in the native plant demonstration garden. Learn which are edible, which have medicinal properties, and which have cultural and historical importance. The event is free for members and $15 for non-members. Click here for more information.

March 5, 11:00 am – Attend Northeast Florida Veg Fest at Riverside Park in Jacksonville. The day-long event will feature live music, dynamic speakers, cooking demonstrations, beer garden, kids’ zone, pie-eating contest, exceptional freebies, raffles, scavenger hunt, and much more! Find more information here.

March 15, 2:00 pm – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Dunnellon Branch of the Marion County Library in Dunnellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Gary Green at (352) 817- 8077 or garryegreen@centurylink.net .

March 16, 12:00 pm – Attend Florida Constitutional Revision Committee: A “Community Rights” Amendment for protecting human and ecological health. This webinar is part of The Center for Earth Jurisprudence’s Protecting Our Common Home series. For registration or further information, contact Sister Pat Siemen at psiemen@barry.edu. Please RSVP at least 48 hours before each program. Directions for participation will be sent to you.

March 19, 10:00 am – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Central Ridge Library in Beverly Hills. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Gary Green at (352) 817- 8077 or garryegreen@centurylink.net .

March 24, 10:30 am – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Ocala Main Branch of the Marion County Library in Ocala. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Gary Green at (352) 817- 8077 or garryegreen@centurylink.net .

March 26, 10:30 am – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Freedom Branch of the Marion County Library in Ocala. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Gary Green at (352) 817- 8077 or garryegreen@centurylink.net .

March 30, 5:30 pm – Participate in a meet and greet for environmental nonprofit groups in Pensacola. Each speaker will be given approximately 10 minutes to provide information on their group. The public is invited to attend. Please contact Mary Gutierrez, Executive Director of Earth Ethics, Inc., if you’re interested. Her e-mail is mary.earthethics@cox.net.

April 2, 2:00 pm – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Forest Branch of the Marion County Library in Ocklawaha. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Gary Green at (352) 817- 8077 or garryegreen@centurylink.net .

April 6, 12:00 pm - April 2, 2:00 pm – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Reddick Branch of the Marion County Library in Ocklawaha. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Gary Green at (352) 817- 8077 or garryegreen@centurylink.net .

April 20, 2:00 pm – Attend The Late Bloomers Garden Club’s Flower Show at The Garden Club of Jacksonville (1005 Riverside Ave). The show will include horticulture, photography, floral design, and a conservation education exhibit featuring wetlands. The juried show has judges coming from around the SE and is a Garden Club of America Flower Show. For more information or contact Leslie Pierpont at lespierpont@mac.com or (904) 388- 1506.

 

 

 

 

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We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

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Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com

About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and a thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

Please Oppose SB 1290 and HB 1075

By Gladys Delgadillo 22 hours ago

Dear FCC Members,
 
Last week, we asked that you write the Legislature in opposition to SB 1290 and HB 1075, and we certainly hope you did. Now, we ask you again to voice your opposition to these bills which propose destructive changes to Florida’s conservation lands policies.  This time, however, we would like to address the Governor for the following reasons:
 
Many parts of these bills were conceived and offered by the Administration and would result in the degradation of our state parks, preserves, and other lands purchased over the past three decades for the purpose of protecting and conserving our natural areas, water and natural resources, and providing world class recreational and leisure opportunities.
 
For more than four years the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) has persistently sought to dispose of and change the allowed use of conservation lands from what they were acquired for to a lesser protected status. DEP proposed to construct an RV park in Honeymoon Island State Park in 2011; this was rejected by the public. In 2013, DEP launched a statewide program to surplus state conservation land and sell it to the highest bidder; this ill-conceived proposal was withdrawn due to widespread public opposition. A 2015 proposal to lease a portion of Myakka River State Park for cattle grazing was withdrawn due to public opposition.  And a more recent proposal by DEP to allow various commercial and other inconsistent activities in State Parks was also shelved due to public opposition. This session, having failed so far in its attempts to circumvent the public’s wishes to protect state conservation lands, the Department has worked with the legislature to circumvent the clear will of the people by conceiving and supporting the majority of the provisions in SB 1290 and HB 1075.
 
We have already asked you to tell the legislature to protect our parks, preserves, forests, and wildlife management areas. It is now time to ask the Governor to intervene to make it clear that he does not support this destructive effort and he wants these bills withdrawn by the sponsors. To use our template to write Governor Scott, click here.

To recapitulate the problems with these bills, SB 1290/HB 1075 threaten Florida’s ability to acquire, preserve and manage state conservation lands and must be withdrawn or amended:

- Provisions within Section 5 and Section 6 allow the State to surplus and sell state lands when it determines that the land's short-term management goals are not being met, if it is not actively managed by any state agency, or if a management plan has not been completed. Failure to meet short-term management goals, an incomplete management plan, or lack of active management may be a direct result of inadequate land management funding by the Legislature, or other temporary or avoidable situations, and should not be used as an excuse to dispose of conservation lands. Instead, the Legislature should ensure adequate funding for the management of Florida's conservation lands.

- Another provision within Section 6 directs the Division of State Lands to review all state-owned conservation lands every ten years to determine whether any can be surplused. This is a duplicative and unnecessary provision since each land management plan requires a review for surplus on a rotating basis when the management plan is updated.

- Language in Section 8 allows private land owners who own land contiguous to state-owned lands to exchange it for the state-owned land, including state park land, if the state is given a permanent conservation easement over both parcels in the exchange. Conservation easements are often less protective of the environment than the management plans for state-owned land, resulting in practices that diminish the conservation values of the lands. Placing state lands in private ownership also reduces the ability of the state to comprehensively manage conservation lands. Finally, this type of exchange will often result in the loss of public access to lands that are currently owned by the state, diminishing the recreational value of the land. This daunting prospect would have a significantly negative impact on such beloved places as Paynes Prairie State Park and Myakka River State Park were they to be placed into private ownership under this provision.

- A policy change in Section 14 allows money from Florida Forever, the state's premiere land acquisition program, to be used to fund all water resource development hardware, including the construction of treatment, transmission, and distribution facilities. Utilizing Florida Forever funds for the construction of water supply infrastructure is currently prohibited under state law. This change comes on the heels of Floridians overwhelmingly approving Amendment 1 in an effort to restore funding for land acquisition. With billions of dollars needed for water infrastructure projects around the state, this provision could readily exhaust the funds set aside in the Land Acquisition Trust Fund, leaving inadequate funding available for acquiring conservation land, and negating the benefits of Amendment 1.

- Finally, language in Sections 15, 17, 21 and 22 allow state lands to be managed for conservation OR recreational purposes, deleting the requirement that state lands be managed in accordance with the purpose for which they were acquired. This could result in conservation lands being managed solely for recreational purposes, which might include converting natural lands into golf courses and other such inappropriate uses, harming the conservation value of the lands and betraying the original intent of acquiring the lands.

Please let the Governor and, if you have not yet done so, your legislators know that these bills are unacceptable and ask the Legislature to withdraw them or vote them down.  Ask them to take the time to carefully consider the public’s views and concerns and work with the conservation community and the public to determine if any needs to alter the state’s land acquisition and management policies exist.  We know it is the legislature who makes the decision to pass bills, but we need a clear statement from Governor Scott that he understands that the public does not want their lands tampered with nor Florida Forever dollars spent for infrastructure projects.

 
To find your legislators, click here. To use our template to write Governor Scott, click here.
 
The member organizations and individuals that make up the Florida Conservation Coalition are working diligently on this important issue.  But it’s people like you, writing and calling these public officials, who will have the most effect in determining the outcome.

 

Governor Scott     rick.scott@eog.myflorida.com     (850) 488- 7146

 
 
Sincerely,
 

Victoria Tschinkel

 
Florida Conservation Coalition

FCC News Brief - Feburary 8, 2016

By Gladys Delgadillo 1 day ago

FCC News Brief

Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

February 8, 2016

 

 

The Tampa Bay Times Editorial Board writes – “[F]racking [is] an aggressive form of oil drilling that could threaten the drinking water supply, damage private property and hurt Florida’s tourist economy…The House sellout to heavy polluters was on full display as it rejected a series of amendments that would have required water testing, imposed tough penalties for damaging spills and given communities a say in whether the activity should be allowed. A companion measure, SB 318, is awaiting action in the Senate Appropriations Committee and committee Chairman Tom Lee…should ensure it never sees the light of day. Fracking is wrong for Florida because the state’s limestone terrain puts underground water sources at risk of contamination…A study last year…found that up to 18,000 gallons of chemicals…are typically injected in each fracking operation. When combined with water…more than 1 million gallons of fluids are typically injected per well. That heavy use would unduly tax Florida’s groundwater resources…Where is the financial argument for the Sunshine State to invest in fossil fuels when clean-energy technology is creating new jobs and a more sustainable future?” Read Fracking bad for Florida

Devon Vann writes for Florida Today – “What the people want is evident in the fact that 20 counties and 40 cities have already banned [fracking]. In fact, 80 percent of Florida Senators have fracking bans in their districts…Floridians will get the…carcinogens and long-term environmental consequences. Tallahassee lawmakers and a few oil tycoons will split the spoils…Concerned about the effects on Florida’s drinking water? The fracking industry doesn’t share your concern- it has been exempt from the Safe Drinking Water Act since 2005…Elsewhere, wastewater has been found to be laced with chemicals such as arsenic, chloride, the known carcinogen benzene as well as naturally occurring radioactive materials such as radon and radium…The wastewater is hazardous to transport and store…[L]egislators’…staff research indicates ‘a significant negative fiscal impact on the state’ (from fracking). ” Read Fracking too hazardous for Florida

Ray Bellamy writes for Tallahassee Democrat – “Pro-fracking legislation being promoted by GOP lawmakers in our legislature is opposed by counties and communities representing more than half of our state’s people…Public health studies question whether we can carry on this evolving technology without serious danger to our people, livestock, karst geology and stressed sole source aquifer. Prematurity, neurologic damage, drinking water supplies contaminated for future generations, demonstrated decrease in property values for those with well water within a half mile of fracking, boom and bust stresses on community resources- the public seems to get it, along with their city and county politicians…All of these politicos from House and Senate will be up for election this year due to redistricting. Let them know you want them to protect our water and future.” Read Could we face a Flint, Mich., drinking water crisis in Florida?

Jeff Burlew reports for Tallahassee Democrat – “A Texas oil company’s plans to conduct seismic testing for oil and gas in Calhoun and Gulf counties are on hold because of a legal challenge filed by a Clarksville man (named Voss) worried it will lead to fracking…About a third of the testing zone is located in wetlands…[Voss] also complained production would lead to pollution and increased traffic from heavy vehicles on rural roads…The Gulf County Commission last year approved a ban on fracking, but the Calhoun County Commission opted not to pass one. Representatives of the Neal Land & Timber Company, which owns much of the land where testing would occur, urged commissioners tin Calhoun County to reject a fracking ban.” Read Seismic testing on hold in Gulf, Calhoun counties

Naples Daily News reports – “An endangered Florida panther found dead…three weeks ago has been ruled a roadkill victim…So far this year, four panthers have died in vehicle collisions, following a record 30 roadkill panthers in 2015.” Read Florida panther found in Okeechobee County ruled a roadkill victim

Isadora Rangel reports for TC Palm – “None of the four bills U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson filed since 2012 to expedite projects caught in red tape to clean the Everglades and St. Lucie River has progressed in Congress. And it’s not looking good for a fifth bill he filed…three days after Lake Okeechobee discharges started…Congress is supposed to pass the Water Resource Development Act every two years, but it took seven years to pass the last one in 2014. That’s why Nelson and other lawmakers, in the meantime, introduced bills to approve Everglades projects…Gov. Rick Scott could provide a boost by lobbying Congress members on behalf of Nelson’s most recent bill, said Frank Jackalone, Florida staff director of the Sierra Club…Yet Scott is considering running for Nelson’s Senate seat in 2018, so supporting a bill by the Democrat could go against Scott’s political aspirations.” Read Nelson’s Everglades bill has slim chance of passing

Pine Island Eagle reports – “Sanibel officials say a ‘perfect storm’ of unfortunate circumstances is being felt on local beaches…Lee County Hotel Association president and general manager of the Inns of Sanibel John Lai [said,] ‘The rains didn’t help, the red tide didn’t help and the discharge from the Caloosahatchee River didn’t help. The timing could not have been any worse, either, with this being the peak season…’…City of Sanibel Mayor Kevin Ruane…called for immediate implementation of a three-point action plan and asked the support of surrounding Mayors…The three points include: Maximizing storage on all private lands currently under contract with the SFWMD; maximize potential storage on public lands within Lee County’ call on the Army Corps of Engineers and the SFWMD to exercise their operational flexibility to hold more water in the Lake.” Read ‘Perfect storm’: Stormy reaction to Lake O discharges

Scott Calahan reports for Daily Commercial – “An Ocala company wants to sink a well and pump nearly a half-million gallons of water a day…and sell it to a Leesburg bottling company…The company owns about 10 acres…that contains what has been called Fern Spring and Heart Spring...SWR Properties is seeking to pump 496,000 gallons of water a day for 2- years – 4,000 less than the 500,000-gallon threshold needed to schedule a public meeting on the permit application…Arlene Smith, a resident of The Villages, [wrote]… ‘If we have such an abundance (of water in the ground), why do we have water restrictions?...We need our own water. To sell this precious resource is sinful.’” Read Permit seeks 500k gallons a day from aquifer

 

 

 

 

 

From Our Readers

The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.



Job Postings

The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

Tall Timbers Research Station & Land Conservancy is seeking a Red Hills Awareness Program Manager


Petitions

Paynes Prairie in danger

Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U.S.A. from Development

 

Making Connections

Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

If your nonprofit organization would like to be a vendor FOR FREE at Earth Day Pensacola 2016, scheduled to be held on April 23rd from 10-4 at Bayview Park, contact Mary Gutierrez at mary.earthethics@cox.net.

 

Upcoming Environmental Events

February 8, 1:30 pm – Attend Manatee Sierra Club’s Conservation Committee Meeting at the Bradenton Library (1301 Barcarrota Blvd.) in Bradenton. Discuss local environmental issues and plan priorities for 2016. Contact Sandra Ripberger for more information at (941) 794- 3878 or sandrarip@yahoo.com

February 9, 12:00 pm – Participate in Center for Earth Jurisprudence’s webinar, “Rights of Nature & Community Rights: What are they? Are they being implemented?” To register (48 hours in advance) and for more information, contact Sister Pat Siemen at psiemen@barry.edu.

February 11-13 – Attend the Public Interest Environmental Conference at the University of Florida College of Law in Gainesville. “Five Oceans, One Earth” is the 2016 topic. Find more information or register for the conference here.

February 13 – Participate in Save Our Parks, Statewide Day of Action. The Day of Action will include rallies, marches, and other events advocating against private, non-conservation uses in public lands including hunting, cattle grazing, timber harvesting, oil drilling, and more. Click here for more information.

February 13, 10:00 am – Attend the 23rd Party in the Park, the Treasure Coast’s first and foremost environmental festival, at Ft Piere Inlet State Park in Ft Pierce. The festival is free and includes food, activities for children and adults, and entertainment by Flint Blade.

February 15, 1:00 pm – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Nature Coast Unitarian Universalist Church in Citrus Springs. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

February 20, 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM – Attend the Orlando Wetlands Festival at Fort Christmas Historical Park in Christmas, FL for guided bird-watching excursions, native plant identification hikes, wilderness hikes, photo hikes, children’s activities, hay and bus rides, and more. Find more info here or call Orlando Wetlands Park at (407) 568- 1706.

February 20, 1:00 pm – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Lakes Region Library in Inverness. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

February 28, 1:30pm, Attend Amphibians & Seasonal Ponds Nature Walk with Dr. Betsie Rothermel, Director of the Herpetology Program at Archbold Biological Station, 123 Main Drive, Venus. Dr. Rothermel will give a lecture and take participants on a short hike to view nearby seasonal ponds. Meet at the Learning Center. All ages are welcome. Wear clothes and shoes appropriate for hiking in a wet environment. Children and adults are welcome. For more information, contact education@archbold-station.org or call 863-465-2571 x233.

February 29, 7:00 pm – Attend Water Voices: “Up & Down with the Floridan Aquifer” at the Wilson S. Rivers Library and Media Center at Florida Gateway College in Lake City. Geologist Jim Gross will present on the structure of the Floridan aquifer; on the connections between the aquifer, springs, drinking water, public health, and the economy; and on long-term trends in aquifer levels and pollution. For more information, call Lu Merritt at (386) 454- 0415.

March 1 – Participate in No Meat March. Take the pledge to go meat-free for 31 days and enjoy the support of an online community with many resources. Find more information here.

March 5, 10:00 am – Join the Florida Wildflower Foundation for an interactive edible plant walk at PEAR Park in Leesburg. You will get to taste, touch and smell some of the native plants growing in the native plant demonstration garden. Learn which are edible, which have medicinal properties, and which have cultural and historical importance. The event is free for members and $15 for non-members. Click here for more information.

March 5, 11:00 am – Attend Northeast Florida Veg Fest at Riverside Park in Jacksonville. The day-long event will feature live music, dynamic speakers, cooking demonstrations, beer garden, kids’ zone, pie-eating contest, exceptional freebies, raffles, scavenger hunt, and much more! Find more information here.

March 15, 2:00 pm – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Dunnellon Branch of the Marion County Library in Dunnellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Gary Green at (352) 817- 8077 or garryegreen@centurylink.net .

March 16, 12:00 pm – Attend Florida Constitutional Revision Committee: A “Community Rights” Amendment for protecting human and ecological health. This webinar is part of The Center for Earth Jurisprudence’s Protecting Our Common Home series. For registration or further information, contact Sister Pat Siemen at psiemen@barry.edu. Please RSVP at least 48 hours before each program. Directions for participation will be sent to you.

March 19, 10:00 am – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Central Ridge Library in Beverly Hills. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Gary Green at (352) 817- 8077 or garryegreen@centurylink.net .

March 24, 10:30 am – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Ocala Main Branch of the Marion County Library in Ocala. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Gary Green at (352) 817- 8077 or garryegreen@centurylink.net .

March 26, 10:30 am – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Freedom Branch of the Marion County Library in Ocala. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Gary Green at (352) 817- 8077 or garryegreen@centurylink.net .

March 30, 5:30 pm – Participate in a meet and greet for environmental nonprofit groups in Pensacola. Each speaker will be given approximately 10 minutes to provide information on their group. The public is invited to attend. Please contact Mary Gutierrez, Executive Director of Earth Ethics, Inc., if you’re interested. Her e-mail is mary.earthethics@cox.net.

April 2, 2:00 pm – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Forest Branch of the Marion County Library in Ocklawaha. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Gary Green at (352) 817- 8077 or garryegreen@centurylink.net .

April 6, 12:00 pm - April 2, 2:00 pm – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Reddick Branch of the Marion County Library in Ocklawaha. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Gary Green at (352) 817- 8077 or garryegreen@centurylink.net .

April 20, 2:00 pm – Attend The Late Bloomers Garden Club’s Flower Show at The Garden Club of Jacksonville (1005 Riverside Ave). The show will include horticulture, photography, floral design, and a conservation education exhibit featuring wetlands. The juried show has judges coming from around the SE and is a Garden Club of America Flower Show. For more information or contact Leslie Pierpont at lespierpont@mac.com or (904) 388- 1506.

 

 

 

 

Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com

About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and a thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - February 6, 2016

By Gladys Delgadillo 3 days ago

FCC News Brief

Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

February 6, 2016

 

 

Mary Ellen Klas reports for the Miami Herald – “The Senate’s budget chief, Sen. Tom Lee, said…he is putting the bill to prevent local governments from imposing regulations on fracking…on hold until the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation, which he believes has been absent from the contentious discussion, is prepared to provide some ‘honest answers.’…The Senate bill is next scheduled for a vote before the Senate Appropriations Committee which Lee chairs…Lee’s home county of Hillsborough…passed a resolution urging the legislature to remove the local preemption language from the bill and remove the provision that shields disclosure of the chemicals used… ‘We want credible, scientific responses to questions. Not special interest responses. And so I think a lot of people have concerns about a number of differences in the bill as it relates to our substrate made of limerock—versus where fracking is going on in other places of the country—as well as the preemption language…’ He said he expects his committee ‘will ultimately agenda the bill’ but ‘we will continue to work with the Department of Environmental Protection to try to get some straight answers.’” Read Sen. Tom Lee says he’s putting brakes on fracking bill until he gets ‘honest answers’ from regulators

Jessica Weiss reports for Miami New Times – “Twenty-seven counties and 41 cities have already banned fracking in Florida…Activists have spent this week pressing Senate Republicans to vote against the bill…Sen. Anitere Flores, from Kendall, came out against the bill…But the oil and gas industry is also flooding the coffers of state lawmakers…As part of the Florida fracking legislation, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection would not have to disclose chemicals used in fracking that are deemed trade secrets, which means the public would likely not have access to information about the chemicals or carcinogens being pumped into the ground.” Read Activists Push Miami Republicans to Kill Plan to Frack in Florida

Bruce Ritchie reports for Politico Florida – “The sponsor of a House bill (HB 7007) that was amended…to prohibit local governments from banning foam plates and other foam containers to protect wildlife said…that a compromise was reached with cities and counties…In 2015, Miami Beach expanded an ordinance restricting use of foam containers to include a ban on their sale or use in stores and restuarants…[The] amendment…[allows] local ordinances adopted before Jan. 1 to remain in effect. Local governments can also restrict the use of polystyrene on public property or local government functions under the compromise language. But Holly Parker, representing the Surfrider Foundation, an environmental group for surfers, said… ‘Polystyrene foam clogs storm drains, is rarely recycled, frequently littered and never biodegrades,’... ‘Regardless of the amendment, this remains a bad bill that takes away a local government’s ability to protect their coasts and communities.’…The Senate bill companion, SB 1010, does not contain the preemption language and has one more committee stop.” Read House sponsor reaches compromise with cities on foam container bans

Christopher Curry reports for The Gainesville Sun – “Federal regulators have approved the controversial Sabal Trail natural gas pipeline project, which will cut through conservation areas, under rivers and near springs in north central Florida…John S. Quarterman, president of the WWALS Watershed Coalition, which fought an unsuccessful legal battle against a Florida Department of Environmental Protection permit for the pipeline, said the FERC permit will not end the fight. ‘In fact, the opposition is increasing…the number of groups and individuals is growing,’ he said. Quarterman noted that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has not issued a permit allowing for construction through wetlands…” Read Feds OK Sabal Trail natural gas pipeline through north central Florida

Jim Saunders reports for the News Service of Florida – “Sen. Joe Negron, a powerful Stuart Republican who is slated to become the Senate president in November, offered an amendment to the Senate’s proposed budget to expand a water-storage project…But as the Senate Appropriations Committee considered the issue, Negron’s proposal drew opposition from committee Chairman Tom Lee,…Majority Leader Bill Galvano,…Rules Chairman David Simmons…and General Government Appropriations Chairman Alan Hays…who oversees environmental funding. It also faced opposition from Sen. Jack Latvala, a Clearwater Republican who is slated to serve as appropriations chairman when Negron becomes president, and Sen. Rene Garcia…who oversees the health budget…Negron proposed shifting $6.75 million of the money from a fund that is used for state park facility improvements. Critics of the amendment said they were not opposed to the water-storage project- but wanted to look for another source of money to tap.” Read Water Projects Splits Senate GOP Leaders

James Rosen reports for Star-Telegram – “Sen. Bill Nelson took to the Senate floor…to launch a fierce assault against a legislative initiative to expand offshore drilling in the Gulf of Mexico by providing states huge financial incentives to increase energy exploration.” Read Bill Nelson blasts proposal to allow offshore drilling near Florida coast

International Dark-Sky Association shares – “Dark skies have rapidly vanished in the eastern United States, leaving very few locations relatively untouched by the effects of artificial light at night. The need to identify and preserve these places is increasingly important for everyone dependent on the natural nighttime environment, from wildlife to stargazers. IDA has recognized the first such protected dark location in the…state of Florida…Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park…” Read Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park Named Florida’s First Dark Sky Place

Kris Sarri writes for USDA Blog – “President Obama is committed to passing on America’s public lands and waters to future generations in better shape than we found them. That’s why he is proposing full funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund in the Fiscal Year 2017 budget, and pursuing permanent authorization in annual mandatory funding for the Fund’s programs beginning in 2018.” Read Investing in Our Public Lands: The President’s Proposal to Fully Fund the Land and Water Conservation Fund

 

 

 

 

 

From Our Readers

The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.



Job Postings

The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

Tall Timbers Research Station & Land Conservancy is seeking a Red Hills Awareness Program Manager


Petitions

Paynes Prairie in danger

Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U.S.A. from Development

 

Making Connections

Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

If your nonprofit organization would like to be a vendor FOR FREE at Earth Day Pensacola 2016, scheduled to be held on April 23rd from 10-4 at Bayview Park, contact Mary Gutierrez at mary.earthethics@cox.net.

 

Upcoming Environmental Events

February 6, 9:00 am- Attend Fire in the Florida Ecosystem, a lecture and demonstration of how fire is important to Florida’s natural habitats, presented by Kevin Main, Land Manager at Archbold Biological Station, 123 Main Drive, in Venus. Meet at the Learning Center. Children and adults are welcome. For more information, contact kmain@archbold-station.org or call 863-465-2571 x253.

February 6, 2:00 pm – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Belleview Branch, Marion County Library. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Gary Green at (352) 817- 8077 or garryegreen@centurylink.net.

February 6, 4:30 pm – Celebrate the first designated International Dark-Sky Park in Florida: Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park in Okeechobee/Osceola Counties with live music, face painting, coffee, and cake. Find out more information here.

February 8, 1:30 pm – Attend Manatee Sierra Club’s Conservation Committee Meeting at the Bradenton Library (1301 Barcarrota Blvd.) in Bradenton. Discuss local environmental issues and plan priorities for 2016. Contact Sandra Ripberger for more information at (941) 794- 3878 or sandrarip@yahoo.com

February 9, 12:00 pm – Participate in Center for Earth Jurisprudence’s webinar, “Rights of Nature & Community Rights: What are they? Are they being implemented?” To register (48 hours in advance) and for more information, contact Sister Pat Siemen at psiemen@barry.edu.

February 11-13 – Attend the Public Interest Environmental Conference at the University of Florida College of Law in Gainesville. “Five Oceans, One Earth” is the 2016 topic. Find more information or register for the conference here.

February 13 – Participate in Save Our Parks, Statewide Day of Action. The Day of Action will include rallies, marches, and other events advocating against private, non-conservation uses in public lands including hunting, cattle grazing, timber harvesting, oil drilling, and more. Click here for more information.

February 13, 10:00 am – Attend the 23rd Party in the Park, the Treasure Coast’s first and foremost environmental festival, at Ft Piere Inlet State Park in Ft Pierce. The festival is free and includes food, activities for children and adults, and entertainment by Flint Blade.

February 15, 1:00 pm – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Nature Coast Unitarian Universalist Church in Citrus Springs. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

February 20, 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM – Attend the Orlando Wetlands Festival at Fort Christmas Historical Park in Christmas, FL for guided bird-watching excursions, native plant identification hikes, wilderness hikes, photo hikes, children’s activities, hay and bus rides, and more. Find more info here or call Orlando Wetlands Park at (407) 568- 1706.

February 20, 1:00 pm – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Lakes Region Library in Inverness. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

February 28, 1:30pm, Attend Amphibians & Seasonal Ponds Nature Walk with Dr. Betsie Rothermel, Director of the Herpetology Program at Archbold Biological Station, 123 Main Drive, Venus. Dr. Rothermel will give a lecture and take participants on a short hike to view nearby seasonal ponds. Meet at the Learning Center. All ages are welcome. Wear clothes and shoes appropriate for hiking in a wet environment. Children and adults are welcome. For more information, contact education@archbold-station.org or call 863-465-2571 x233.

February 29, 7:00 pm – Attend Water Voices: “Up & Down with the Floridan Aquifer” at the Wilson S. Rivers Library and Media Center at Florida Gateway College in Lake City. Geologist Jim Gross will present on the structure of the Floridan aquifer; on the connections between the aquifer, springs, drinking water, public health, and the economy; and on long-term trends in aquifer levels and pollution. For more information, call Lu Merritt at (386) 454- 0415.

March 1 – Participate in No Meat March. Take the pledge to go meat-free for 31 days and enjoy the support of an online community with many resources. Find more information here.

March 5, 10:00 am – Join the Florida Wildflower Foundation for an interactive edible plant walk at PEAR Park in Leesburg. You will get to taste, touch and smell some of the native plants growing in the native plant demonstration garden. Learn which are edible, which have medicinal properties, and which have cultural and historical importance. The event is free for members and $15 for non-members. Click here for more information.

March 5, 11:00 am – Attend Northeast Florida Veg Fest at Riverside Park in Jacksonville. The day-long event will feature live music, dynamic speakers, cooking demonstrations, beer garden, kids’ zone, pie-eating contest, exceptional freebies, raffles, scavenger hunt, and much more! Find more information here.

March 15, 2:00 pm – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Dunnellon Branch of the Marion County Library in Dunnellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Gary Green at (352) 817- 8077 or garryegreen@centurylink.net .

March 16, 12:00 pm – Attend Florida Constitutional Revision Committee: A “Community Rights” Amendment for protecting human and ecological health. This webinar is part of The Center for Earth Jurisprudence’s Protecting Our Common Home series. For registration or further information, contact Sister Pat Siemen at psiemen@barry.edu. Please RSVP at least 48 hours before each program. Directions for participation will be sent to you.

March 19, 10:00 am – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Central Ridge Library in Beverly Hills. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Gary Green at (352) 817- 8077 or garryegreen@centurylink.net .

March 24, 10:30 am – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Ocala Main Branch of the Marion County Library in Ocala. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Gary Green at (352) 817- 8077 or garryegreen@centurylink.net .

March 26, 10:30 am – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Freedom Branch of the Marion County Library in Ocala. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Gary Green at (352) 817- 8077 or garryegreen@centurylink.net .

March 30, 5:30 pm – Participate in a meet and greet for environmental nonprofit groups in Pensacola. Each speaker will be given approximately 10 minutes to provide information on their group. The public is invited to attend. Please contact Mary Gutierrez, Executive Director of Earth Ethics, Inc., if you’re interested. Her e-mail is mary.earthethics@cox.net.

April 2, 2:00 pm – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Forest Branch of the Marion County Library in Ocklawaha. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Gary Green at (352) 817- 8077 or garryegreen@centurylink.net .

April 6, 12:00 pm - April 2, 2:00 pm – Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at the Reddick Branch of the Marion County Library in Ocklawaha. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Gary Green at (352) 817- 8077 or garryegreen@centurylink.net .

April 20, 2:00 pm – Attend The Late Bloomers Garden Club’s Flower Show at The Garden Club of Jacksonville (1005 Riverside Ave). The show will include horticulture, photography, floral design, and a conservation education exhibit featuring wetlands. The juried show has judges coming from around the SE and is a Garden Club of America Flower Show. For more information or contact Leslie Pierpont at lespierpont@mac.com or (904) 388- 1506.

 

 

 

 

Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com

About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and a thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Floridas land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

Charter Members

FOUNDER and CHAIRMAN
Bob Graham, Former Governor of Florida and U.S. Senator

VICE CHAIRMEN
Nathaniel  Pryor Reed, Former Assistant Secretary of the Interior, Former Chairman SFWMD, Founder and Chairman Emeritus 1000 Friends of Florida 
And
Com. Lee Constantine, Seminole County Commissioner and Former State Senator, State Representative and Mayor of Altamonte Springs

AUDUBON FLORIDA

Eric Draper, Executive Director

CONSERVANCY OF SOUTHWEST FLORIDA
Rob Moher, President
Jennifer Hecker, 
Director of Natural Resource Policy

FLORIDA WILDLIFE FEDERATION
Manley Fuller, President
Martha Musgrove, Board Member
Preston Robertson, General Counsel and VP for Conservation

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS
Pam Goodman, President

1000 FRIENDS OF FLORIDA

Victoria Tschinkel
, Board Member and former Secretary of Department of Environmental Regulation
Ryan Smart, President

Charles Pattison, Policy Director 
Roy Rogers, Board Member

SIERRA CLUB
Craig Diamond
Frank Jackalone, Senior Organizing Manager

ST. JOHNS RIVERKEEPER
Lisa Rinaman, Riverkeeper
Jimmy Orth
, Executive Director

THE NATURE CONSERVANCY
John Robert Middlemas, Chair
Janet Bowman, Director of Legislative Policy and Strategy

TRUST FOR PUBLIC LAND
Greg Chelius, Florida State Director
Will Abberger, Director Conservation Finance

INDIVIDUALS
Lester Abberger 
John Finlayson, Agriculturist, Jefferson County, former Chairman SRWMD
Bill Kerr, Environmental Consultant, Brevard County, former Chairman SJRWMD
Gary Kuhl, Former Executive Director, SWFWMD 
Jay Landers, Former Secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection, Former Director of the Department of Natural Resources

Allan Milledge, Former Chairman ELMs Committee and SFWMD
Auley Rowell, Agriculturist, Taylor County, former Chairman of SRWMD 
Earl Starnes, Former Dade County Commissioner, Former Director of the Division of State Planning
Sonny Vergara, Former Executive Director, SWFWMD and SJRWMD
Estus Whitfield, Former Principal Environmental Advisor to 5 Florida Governors

Mailing Address


Florida Conservation Coalition

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