News and Announcements

FCC News Brief - May 26, 2016

Posted by Gladys Delgadillo, Thursday, May 26th, 2016 @ 10:03am

  • FCC News Brief

    Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

    May 26, 2016

     

    Eliot Kleinberg reports for the Palm Beach Post – “The group fighting to overturn approval of the sprawling development now called Westlake said…it’s appealing last month’s ruling to dismiss its case. ‘We believe this ruling is inconsistent with numerous comprehensive plan policies regarding development and road design in and around rural communities,’ 1000 Friends of Florida attorney…said…After the county approved the project, formerly known as Minto West, environmentalists, preservationists and residents of The Acreage sued, arguing that the project violated state laws against sprawl and that the county had ignored its own comprehensive plan.” Read “1000 Friends of Florida” appeals rejection of attempt to block Minto West/Westlake

    The Naples Daily News Editorial Board writes – “The Southwest Florida ruling involves Corkscrew Farms, a planned 1,325-unit development east of Estero in the Density Reduction/Groundwater Resource area, a conservation region long considered important to wildlife and the water supply…The suit was filed by the Estero Council of Community Leaders and the Responsible Growth Management Coalition. Essentially, the ruling tells those citizen groups they don’t have a right to block a project based on concerns about traffic, the environment and wildlife because they aren’t directly affected property owners…For two years since 75 percent of voters backed Amendment 1, the Legislature hasn’t come close to allocating the $300 million yearly that went into the state’s Florida Forever land-buying program…A majority of seats are at stake on both the Lee and Collier commissions this year, giving voters a chance to find out where candidates stand on land acquisition.” Read Lee property rights ruling brings conservation lands into focus

    Ayn Marie Samuelson writes for Florida Today – “Some 20 years ago, FLORIDA  TODAY’s headlines informed readers that our Lagoon was sick. Over two decades later…the diagnosis is grave…[T]he layers of government and their bureaucracies, from the federal and state, to the counties and cities, have failed to properly diagnose and treat the “patient”…[T]he political and bureaucratic functions of government have become collaborators in failure, ultimately leading to taxpayer desperation and distrust. For example, after the most recent fish-kill, the county’s response has been to suggest a property tax increase, without first having proposed a plausible plan of action…We know from experience that higher taxes will not activate quality decision-making. Instead of a well-researched, coordinated plan of action that assesses both costs and benefits, and efficient allocation of our limited resources, residents encountered more government resolutions, committees and task forces.” Read Is the Indian River DOA?

    Isadora Rangel reports for the TC Palm – “(Incoming Senate President) Negron, R-Stuart, said he’s been talking to scientists, environmentalists and the agriculture industry and asked each group to give him their solutions to the (Lake Okeechobee) discharges. He said he expects to decide on the best plan by early fall, just before state lawmakers begin meeting in committees to prepare for the 2017 legislative session…He then will lobby his fellow lawmakers to accept the plan and allocate money…As Senate president…Negron will be in a powerful position to negotiate with Gov. Rick Scott and incoming House Speaker Richard Corcoran…The money for the proposal would come from a law…that creates a dedicated fund for Everglades restoration…[from] Amendment 1 dollars…Negron said he will use a 2014 University of Florida study to guide his decision.” Read Plan to cut Lake O discharges in pipeline, incoming Senate President Joe Negron vows

    Scott Maxwell reports for the Orlando Sentinel – “Florida is about to experience the wildest, most wide-open election season this state has seen in a generation…In past years, most Florida races were deadly dull with predetermined winners. One year, not a single incumbent in the entire state- for Congress, State House or State Senate- lost a bid for re-election. Not a one. This year, however, things will be different…I just want this election cycle to be what elections are supposed to be- opportunities for change and reckoning – which they haven’t been in a long time, thanks to gerrymandering.” Read Florida elections may be a bloodbath. Hallelujah!

    Bruce Ritchie reports for Politico Florida – “Guest, 64, is retiring after 26 years as managing attorney of Earthjustice in Florida, in a career that has put him at the center of many key environmental battles and earned him praise from allies and opponents alike. No successor has been named.” Read Environmentalists’ ‘Elvis’ reflects on a generation leading Earthjustice

    Eliot Kleinberg reports for my Palm Beach Post – “Broward County will soon reroute as much as 20 million gallons a day of treated wastewater to neighborhoods and golf courses west of Boca Raton…Broward has been dumping the wastewater into the Atlantic Ocean, but Florida gave it a deadline of 2025 to stop.” Read Broward wastewater soon heading to west Boca instead of ocean

    The Center for Biological Diversity writes for eNews Park Forest – “In a partisan vote, the U.S. house of Representatives passed the 2017 National Defense Authorization Act, which, if enacted into law, would gut protections for several endangered species…and remove the Clean Water Act’s ability to control destructive invasive species. The must-pass legislation now moves to the Senate… ‘Republicans know that the overwhelming majority of Americans support the Endangered Species Act and our public lands, so they use ‘military readiness’ as a shield to advance their extreme agenda,’ said Brett Hartle, endangered species policy director at the Center for Biological Diversity…The Obama administration has threatened to veto the House’s bill.” Read House Passes Most Environmentally Destructive Defense Authorization Act in History

     

     

    From Our Readers

    The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

     



    Job Postings

    The North Florida Land Trust is seeking a Land Protection Specialist

    The Community Power Network is seeking a Florida Program Director

    The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign


    Petitions

    Ask the SFWMD to deny the permit for the Crosstown Parkway that cuts through TWO State Preserves

    Save the Econlockhatchee River!

    Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

    Save Conservation Land Surrounding Gemini Springs

    Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

    Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

    Paynes Prairie in danger

    Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

    Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

     

    Making Connections

    Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

     

    Upcoming Environmental Events

    May 26, 6:00 pm – Attend Santa Rosa’s Board of County Commission Meeting in the board meeting room at 6495 Caroline Street in Milton. Share your opinions on the proposed RIB station near Williams Creek. For more information on this issue, click here.

    May 28, 2:00 pm – Attend Friends of Lullwater Lake’s Board of Directors Meeting at 16423 E Lullwater Drive.  Participants will continue the planning and implementation process of restoring the Coastal Dune Lake.

    June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park. Fore more information, contact Marlue Maris at localon30a@gmail.com

    June 7, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs chemistry: General, nutrients, and trace contaminants. For more information, click here.

    June 18, 2:00 pm – Attend “Karst Environments in Florida and Geology of Fred George Basin,” a presentation by Harley Means (FLGS Geologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    June 25, 2:00 pm – Attend “The Beautiful Life of a Dead Tree: The Most Important Tree in the Woods,” a presentation by Jim Stevenson (Florida Springs Expert), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

     

     

     

    Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

    We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

    Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

    Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

    If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

    Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at

    About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

    For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - May 25, 2016

Posted by Gladys Delgadillo, Wednesday, May 25th, 2016 @ 2:30pm

  • FCC News Brief

    Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

    May 25, 2016

     

    Dinah Voyles Pulver reports for The Daytona Beach News-Journal – “DeBary officials worked to keep details of their plans and negotiations for 102 acres of conservation land under wraps during meetings over the past year…A review of public records including meeting videos and emails shows city officials discussed people in meetings without mentioning names- names which they still haven’t supplied- and even told a consultant not to bring up the 102 acres at a public workshop on the city’s proposed transit plan last October. A review of those meetings also may have linked the plan back to the forced resignations a year ago of several high-ranking officials at the St. Johns River Water Management District, the agency that owns the land…At [Volusia’s] County Council meeting…the council voted unanimously to consider a resolution opposing DeBary’s plans for the land.” Read DeBary kept plan details low-profile

    Jim Turner reports for the Palm Beach Post – “Seminole County commissioners, over opposition from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), said Tuesday they don’t want another statewide bear hunt…The resolution, which joins similar requests from Volusia and Miami-Dade counties, said that if a hunt occurs, the [FWC] should ‘at a minimum’ prohibit the hunt in the central part of the state that includes Seminole County…[A] commissioner said incidents involving bears have noticeably declined since an ordinance was enacted in December that set rules for trash containers and leaving food outdoors…[FWC] has been working with 14 counties that have the most incidents of human-bear conflicts on ordinances needed to receive…state money.” Read Seminole latest of three counties opposed to bear hunt in their area

    Jim Waymer reports for Florida Today – “Gary Roderick (environmental consultant and former county and state environmental administrator) sees the solid leftovers from sewage treatment (also referred to as sludge or biosolids) as one of Indian River Lagoon’s most unheralded pollution problems…Sludge is…given class AA, class A or class B status, depending on the level of bacteria, metals and other contaminants removed. Class AA is the cleanest level…but still contains some pathogens and nutrients that can feed algae blooms if they reach water…[I]n 2010…new Florida rules left unregulated [Class AA sludge], in cases when it’s mixed with mulch and marketed and distributed as fertilizer. Then cities could give it away, sell it for cheap or pay haulers to take it away to spread virtually anywhere, untracked…For farmers, sludge is a huge money saver, and less damaging to the environment than expensive chemical fertilizers…Audubon of Florida in 2009 estimated sludge was getting spread on the watershed at 450 to 1,620 times the ideal level to meet nitrogen and phosphorus limits for Lake Okeechobee.” Read Is sludge also sickening the lagoon?

    Christopher Joyce reports for MPBN – “Because of climate change and sea level rise, the ocean is starting to seep into the [Everglades]….In response to the salt,…plants actually pull up some of their roots…This could be the future of the Everglades….As seawater seeps up from underneath…it is (also) contaminating the aquifer…Julie Hill-Gabriel, who directs Everglades policy for the National Audubon Society in Florida…says… ‘What we do in the Everglades is 100 percent going to affect you in your neighborhood- [and whether] when you turn on the tap water, you have enough fresh clean water…It really just compounds the urgency to move that freshwater south.’” Read Rising Seas Push Too Much Salt Into The Florida Everglades

    Bill Kearney writes for the Miami New Times – “Though the seagrass beds and his home waters have been deteriorating for decades, the summer of 2013 was a turning point, as pollution-induced algae blooms transformed the [Indian River Lagoon] into a human health hazard…The water grew so foul that boat captains and small business owners refer to that period as the ‘lost summer.’ When Conner lost 35 fishing charters over two months - $13,000 of income- he was irate…On both Florida’s east coast and the west fishing guides are losing business, paddleboard shops are shuttering, real-estate agents are losing deals, and vacationers are canceling trips…It’s having an unusual political effect: Normally conservative Southwest Florida voters are lining up with tree-hugging environmentalists….Both the blue-collar and the rich are pissed off.” Read Angry About Florida’s Ruined Waters, Fishermen Unite Against Big Sugar

    Catalin Cimpanu reports for Softpedia – “A member of the Anonymous hacker collective has uploaded a video online requesting the impeachment and immediate resignation of Florida Governor Rick Scott. In videos…the group launches accusations of corruption and complacency when it comes to the state’s dangerous situation regarding its polluted waters…The group specifically outlines the case of Lake Okeechobee…” Read Anonymous Goes After Florida Gov. Rick Scott for Polluting the Gulf of Mexico

    Hannah Morse reports for the Bradenton Herald – “A little piece of Old Florida is well on its way to being forever protected after a unanimous vote by the 13-member governing board of the Southwest Florida Water Management District.” Read Triangle Ranch near Myakka one step closer to becoming a conservation easement

    Sue Sturgis reports for The Institute for Southern Studies – “[A] damaged pipeline at a Royal Dutch  Shell deepwater production field…spilled…oil into the Gulf of Mexico…On Wings of Care, a nonprofit environmental watchdog group…noted that the slick covered…about 5,000 acres… ‘We haven’t seen images like this since the BP disaster of 2010.’…The spill was first reported…after a Shell helicopter reported seeing an oil sheen near four subsea wells. SkyTruth, [an]…environmental watchdog group…pointed [out,] ‘…a modern pipeline…leaked thousands of gallons of oil, and that leak was…discovered [n]ot because high-tech telemetry on the pipeline signaled an alarm due to a drop in pressure; not because flow metering detected a difference between what was going in one end of the pipe vs. what was coming out the other. How long would this leak have continued, if not for the sheer luck of having a vigilant pilot…?’….The latest spill comes amid a growing movement to halt the issuance of new offshore oil and gas drilling leases…From May 3 through May 15, there were more than 20 protest actions involving some 30,000 people on six continents as part of an action called “Break Free from Fossil Fuels.”” Read Another Gulf oil spill adds fuel to movement against new offshore drilling leases

     

     

    From Our Readers

    The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

     



    Job Postings

    The Community Power Network is seeking a Florida Program Director

    The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign


    Petitions

    Ask the SFWMD to deny the permit for the Crosstown Parkway that cuts through TWO State Preserves

    Save the Econlockhatchee River!

    Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

    Save Conservation Land Surrounding Gemini Springs

    Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

    Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

    Paynes Prairie in danger

    Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

    Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

     

    Making Connections

    Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

     

    Upcoming Environmental Events

    May 26, 6:00 pm – Attend Santa Rosa’s Board of County Commission Meeting in the board meeting room at 6495 Caroline Street in Milton. Share your opinions on the proposed RIB station near Williams Creek. For more information on this issue, click here.

    May 28, 2:00 pm – Attend Friends of Lullwater Lake’s Board of Directors Meeting at 16423 E Lullwater Drive.  Participants will continue the planning and implementation process of restoring the Coastal Dune Lake.

    June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park. Fore more information, contact Marlue Maris at

    June 7, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs chemistry: General, nutrients, and trace contaminants. For more information, click here.

    June 18, 2:00 pm – Attend “Karst Environments in Florida and Geology of Fred George Basin,” a presentation by Harley Means (FLGS Geologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    June 25, 2:00 pm – Attend “The Beautiful Life of a Dead Tree: The Most Important Tree in the Woods,” a presentation by Jim Stevenson (Florida Springs Expert), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

     

     

     

    Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

    We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

    Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

    Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

    If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

    Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at

    About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

    For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - May 24, 2016

Posted by Gladys Delgadillo, Tuesday, May 24th, 2016 @ 8:54am

  • FCC News Brief

    Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

    May 24, 2016

     

    Mary Ellen Klas reports for the Miami Herald – “In a swift 17-minute meeting…NextEra Energy won shareholder approval of a $31 million compensation package for its five top executives, and defeated two proposals aimed at increasing transparency over how the company is handling sea level rise and political contributions. ‘The company you own had a very strong 2015,’ declared NextEra president and CEO Jim Robo….The company…is the parent of Florida Power & Light…Robo did not address troubles ahead, such as the federal and state orders for FPL to clean up its leaking cooling canals…” Read Shareholders of FPL’s parent company reject climate change report

    Jim Ash reports for WFSU – “In the U.S. Senate, Florida and Alabama are pressuring Georgia to join a water-sharing compact for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river system. But it could be too late for scores of families downstream who earned their livelihoods from the dying Apalachicola River…A single reservoir in Atlanta holds 65 percent of all constrained water. But…Tonsmeire (Apalachicola Riverkeeper) says. ‘The real monster use, two to three times what Atlanta uses, is the ag industry down here in the lower Flint…’ Washington will have to act soon because more is at stake than the Apalachicola seafood industry…Satellites show the fresh water flows far out into the Gulf of Mexico, where it sustains a fishery worth tens of billions of dollars…Parrish (a Franklin County Commissioner) says he couldn’t believe his ears when an Atlanta water manager predicted the city’s population will double in 10 years. . ‘If you can’t provide fresh water and you don’t have the infrastructure in place for 6.5 million, where are you going to get it for 13 million people? That explains it all to you right there.’…Even if Georgia signs a compact…there’s no guarantee it won’t fall apart like the last one did in the 1990s.” Read After 30 Years, Apalachicola Water War Still Rages

    Frank Cerabino reports for my Palm Beach Post – “The state is planning to increase the allowable limits of several cancer-causing chemicals in Florida’s rivers, streams, lakes and estuaries… Bellamy…is a former board member of the Florida Environmental Regulation Commission. He was appointed by both Democratic and Republican governors during the 1980s to that commission, which operates in conjunction with the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation. ‘In those days, the Department was a committed defender of our natural treasures,’ he wrote. ‘Sadly,…DEP employees, some of whom are my patients, now all fear for their jobs and are facilitating industry in most cases. Institutional knowledge has disappeared and aggressive enforcement of regulations is decried.’… ‘If you ask the 20 million Floridians and 100 million visitors ‘Should we allow more carcinogens into the water?’ Nobody would say ‘Yes.’’ said Linda Young, the director of the Florida Clean Water Network. ‘Only the polluters want this to externalize their costs.’” Read Dirty water shouldn’t be our future, environmentalists say

    The Gainesville Sun Editorial Board writes – “Water is Florida’s lifeblood. Tourists from around the world visit the state’s beaches and springs, while residents rely on the aquifer to supply our drinking water.  Yet state officials seem willing to poison our water for the sake of polluters…Jeers: The Florida Department of Environmental Protection, for seeking to weaken standards for the release of cancer-causing chemicals into surface water…[T]he change is part of an occasional update required under the Clean Water Act that hasn’t’ happened since the early 1990s.” Read Cheers and jeers

    Treasure Coast Newspapers Editorial Board writes – “We’re not looking for a temporary fix. We need a lasting remedy that will shut the flood gates that have been sending fouled water into our estuary for more than eight decades. And U.S. Sugar, one of the two largest landowners in the Everglades Agricultural Area, must be a party to the solution…Take Wade (U.S. Sugar senior vice president for corporate strategy and business development) up on his commitment to begin talks with local leaders and environmentalists to find a way to end the discharges.  We recommend the University of Florida’s Water Institute lead the effort. It is familiar with the problems, having completed a report commissioned by the Florida Senate in 2015…[S]oon-to-be state Senate President Joe Negron…commissioned the…UF water study…He should find the money…” Read U.S. Sugar must help end Lagoon pollution

    Coral Davenport and Emmarie Huetteman report for The New York Times – “House and Senate negotiators reached agreement…on far-reaching legislation to overhaul the nation’s 40-year-old law governing toxic chemicals…Under the new bill, E.P.A. regulations would pre-empt most new state regulations…Environmental groups failed in their push to allow states to enact laws stronger than federal rules. Daniel Rosenberg of the Natural Resources Defense Council said…that the new bill was still too week, citing its pre-emption…its failure to provide the E.P.A. with enough authority to check imported products, and its restrictions on citizens’ abilities to petition the E.P.A…Under the 1976 law, the E.P.A. is required to evaluate the safety of new chemicals introduced…but not the roughly 64,000 chemicals that were already being used…The new measure would require the E.P.A. to begin evaluating those untested chemicals…User fees of as much as $25 million a year would be levied on companies to help pay for the testing…The new legislation would also require the E.P.A. to take only the health and environmental effects of a chemical into account when devising new rules, not the financial effect of those regulations. The existing law requires new chemical regulations to consider compliance costs.” Read Lawmakers Reach Deal to Expand Regulation of Toxic Chemicals

    Peter Andrew Hart reports for The Huffington Post – “A group of teenagers who sued the Massachusetts state government over its failure to adequately address the threat of climate change won a major court case…adding to a string of victories for young activists….The court ordered the [state Department of Environmental Protection] to produce and implement stronger and more expansive regulations…The verdict…comes just weeks after another group of young people forced Washington state to craft science-based emission rules this year.” Read Young People Suing Their Government Over Climate Change Just Won Another Big Case

    Conrad Defiebre reports for the TC Palm – “South Florida water control structures have killed about 200 manatees since 1974…The district hopes new technology will help it do a better job of keeping manatees safe…The board…approved negotiations with a Louisiana firm offering to study and develop an upgrade for the current system…” Read SFWMD hopes touchless manatee detectors will curb deaths

     

     

    From Our Readers

    The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

     



    Job Postings

    The Community Power Network is seeking a Florida Program Director

    The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign


    Petitions

    Ask the SFWMD to deny the permit for the Crosstown Parkway that cuts through TWO State Preserves

    Save the Econlockhatchee River!

    Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

    Save Conservation Land Surrounding Gemini Springs

    Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

    Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

    Paynes Prairie in danger

    Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

    Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

     

    Making Connections

    Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

     

    Upcoming Environmental Events

    May 25, 10:00 am – Listen to DEP’s FREE webinar, Managing Florida’s Organics: Part II Strategies and Directions. The webinar will discuss strategies to deal with organics as part of an effort to reach a 75% recycling goal by 2020. Learn more and register here.

    May 26, 6:00 pm – Attend Santa Rosa’s Board of County Commission Meeting in the board meeting room at 6495 Caroline Street in Milton. Share your opinions on the proposed RIB station near Williams Creek. For more information on this issue, click here.

    May 28, 2:00 pm – Attend Friends of Lullwater Lake’s Board of Directors Meeting at 16423 E Lullwater Drive.  Participants will continue the planning and implementation process of restoring the Coastal Dune Lake.

    June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park. Fore more information, contact Marlue Maris at

    June 7, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs chemistry: General, nutrients, and trace contaminants. For more information, click here.

    June 18, 2:00 pm – Attend “Karst Environments in Florida and Geology of Fred George Basin,” a presentation by Harley Means (FLGS Geologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    June 25, 2:00 pm – Attend “The Beautiful Life of a Dead Tree: The Most Important Tree in the Woods,” a presentation by Jim Stevenson (Florida Springs Expert), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

     

     

     

    Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

    We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

    Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

    Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

    If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

    Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at

    About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

    For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - May 23, 2016

Posted by Gladys Delgadillo, Monday, May 23rd, 2016 @ 9:15am

  • FCC News Brief

    Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

    May 23, 2016

     

    Al Everson reports for The West Volusia Beacon – “Opponents of development on conservation land in DeBary may get their way, as the Volusia County Council…unanimously called for a resolution forbidding any private development on the land known as Gemini Springs Addition. That resolution is to be ready for the action by the County Council at its meeting on Thursday, June 2. The County Council’s move came one day after about 40 people walked out of a DeBary City Council meeting to discuss plans for the land.” Read County Council moves for moratorium on DeBary land development

    Robert Knight writes for The Gainesville Sun – “Trump’s nest egg was millions of dollars from his successful father. Florida received a much greater bank balance in the form of trillions of gallons of pure, fresh groundwater, literally just below our feet…At a current delivered cost of about $3 to $5 per 1,000 gallons, the clean water in the Floridan Aquifer is worth as much as or more than all of the real estate in Florida…An endowment of $1 billion generates an annual income of about $50 million in todays’ markets. Squandering an endowment for short-term needs is bad business…The public at-large owns the water in the aquifer…The Howard T. Odum Florida Springs Institute has initiated the Blue-Water Audit Project...[I]nstitute scientists are developing a program to estimate everyone’s aquifer impacts…Keep your eyes on the springs institute’s website to find out how you can conduct your own Blue Water Audit. This knowledge will make you a more conscientious citizen with a stake in protecting your priceless groundwater inheritance.” Read Accounting for our groundwater inheritance

    Mary Ellen Klas and Jenny Staletovich report for the Miami Herald – “Florida Power & Light has put its Turkey Point nuclear expansion plans on the back burner- for at least four years…Despite the delay, the company is asking to be able to charge customers another $22 million in 2017. The utility also asked the PSC to waive the requirement that it prove the project remains “feasible.”…Meanwhile, how and who will pay for the clean-up costs of the polluted cooling canals remains a question. FPL has said it will ask the PSC for approval to have customers pay for the clean-up…State Rep. Jose Javier Rodriguez…has urged regulators to reject all rate or fee increases sought by FPL until the issues related to the salinity of the cooling canal system is resolved.” Read FPL postpones Turkey Point nuclear expansion – for at least four years

    Mary Ellen Klas reports for the Miami Herald – “In a rebuke to Florida Power & Light, the Florida Supreme Court…ruled that state regulators exceeded their authority when they allowed the company to charge customers for its speculative investment into an Oklahoma-based fracking company. In June of last year, the Public Service Commission rejected its staff recommendation and unanimously approved guidelines that gave FPL the right to charge its customers up to $500 million a year for speculative natural gas fracking…without oversight from regulators for the next five years…The court…ruled that the investment was a risk that should be charged to shareholders, not ratepayers…” Read Supreme Court rejects Florida Power & Light’s attempt to make customers pay for fracking

    Michael Biesecker reports for News On 6 – “Federal regulators announced tighter guidelines…for human exposure to an industrial chemical used for decades in such consumer products as non-stick pans, stain-resistant carpets and microwave popcorn bags….The [EPA] said the new limits were prompted by recent scientific studies linking PFOA and PFOS to testicular and kidney cancers, as well as birth defects and liver damage…Trace amounts of PFOA and PFOS can be detected in the blood of almost every American as the result of exposure through food and consumer products.” Read EPA suggests tighter limits for industrial chemical in water

    Dave Dunwoody reports for WUWF – “Residents in the Florida Panhandle are being encouraged to become “Bear Aware:” keeping bears and other wildlife away from their homes…While black bears normally are too shy to risk contact with humans, if they’re hungry they’re not above raiding garbage cans. Plus, they can smell food from over a mile away. Becca Nelson at the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission reminds everyone of a sad adage: ‘A fed bear is a dead bear.’…Food-conditioned bears that lose that instinctive fear of humans are a public safety risk, and in turn must be destroyed by FWC officers. Bear-proofing a residence is fairly straightforward, and usually begins with an evaluation of the property. Biologists at FWC are standing by.” Read Florida Wildlife Conservation Urges Floridians to Become ‘Bear Aware’

    Tyler Treadway reports for the TC Palm – “Sen. Thad Altmna…said he’ll ask the 2017 Florida Legislature for money to research and teach the public and emergency room staff about the natural but sometimes deadly bacteria (Vibrio vulnificus).” Read Sen. Thad Altman will seek state money to research Indian River Lagoon Vibrio bacteria

    Terry Spencer reports for the Orlando Sentinel – “Researchers have confirmed that three Nile crocodiles were captured near Miami, and they say it’s possible more of the man-eating reptiles are still out there, although no one can say for sure… ‘They didn’t swim from Africa,’ University of Florida herpetologist Kenneth Krysko said. ‘But we really don’t know how they got into the wild.’…Nile crocs are believed to be responsible for up to 200 fatalities annually in their native sub-Saharan Africa…The Nile croc, if it became established in the Everglades, would pose another invasive threat to its teetering ecosystem. Through crossbreeding, they could endanger the smaller…American crocodiles, which have never been responsible for a confirmed human death in the U.S.” Read Nile crocodiles slither into South Florida

     

     

    From Our Readers

    The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

     



    Job Postings

    The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign


    Petitions

    Ask the SFWMD to deny the permit for the Crosstown Parkway that cuts through TWO State Preserves

    Save the Econlockhatchee River!

    Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

    Save Conservation Land Surrounding Gemini Springs

    Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

    Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

    Paynes Prairie in danger

    Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

    Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

     

    Making Connections

    Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

     

    Upcoming Environmental Events

    May 26, 6:00 pm – Attend Santa Rosa’s Board of County Commission Meeting in the board meeting room at 6495 Caroline Street in Milton. Share your opinions on the proposed RIB station near Williams Creek. For more information on this issue, click here.

    June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park. Fore more information, contact Marlue Maris at

    June 7, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs chemistry: General, nutrients, and trace contaminants. For more information, click here.

    June 18, 2:00 pm – Attend “Karst Environments in Florida and Geology of Fred George Basin,” a presentation by Harley Means (FLGS Geologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    June 25, 2:00 pm – Attend “The Beautiful Life of a Dead Tree: The Most Important Tree in the Woods,” a presentation by Jim Stevenson (Florida Springs Expert), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

     

     

     

    Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

    We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

    Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

    Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

    If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

    Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at .  

    About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

    For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief- May 20, 2016

Posted by Gladys Delgadillo, Friday, May 20th, 2016 @ 10:09am

  • FCC News Brief

    Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

    May 20, 2016

     

    Tallahassee Democrat Editorial Board writes – “Water…is all around us and seems to be permanently under siege by big builders, farming interests and energy companies. A half-century ago, it was the Everglades Jetport…Then there was the Cross-Florida Barge Canal…From time to time, different plans to permit offshore oil drilling pop up. Florida and adjoining states have been squabbling, and suing, over Apalachicola River water quality for decades. And in the past legislative session, a bill to stop cities and counties from banning… ‘fracking” was mercifully put to sleep. It will be back. Sometimes, we have to wonder which side state government is on. The Department of Environmental Protection is revising limits on toxic chemicals allowed in surface waters…We’d feel a little safer…if Florida had a reputation for putting science and public health ahead of needs of the pulp  and phosphate industries, big farming and developers.” Read Don’t water down standards

    Maryann Batlle reports for the Naples Daily News – “Estero supports an effort to secure $13.7 million of state funding for the preservation of 2,841 acres in southeast Lee County….If state funding is made available, CREW Headwaters would lessen the harm caused by the degraded water that has flowed into southeast Lee’s marshes for at least the last 50 years…It is also in prime Florida panther territory.” Read Estero endorses proposed $13.7 million state conservation project

    Tyler Treadway reports for the TC Palm – “[H]eavy rainfall increases the potential for algae blooms in the Indian River Lagoon…[More rain brings] two things…: -Freshwater that lowers the estuary’s salinity level and promotes the growth of blue-green algae; and – Farm runoff containing fertilizers that feed the algae, which is actually bacteria that is more likely to occur under the high temperatures and sunny days the region has been experiencing.” Read Record rainfall increases risk of algae blooms in Indian River Lagoon

    Kevin Wadlow reports for Keys Info Net – “A draft resolution demanding Everglades restoration was pulled from…Monroe [County’s] Commission agenda but that county is not backing down. ‘It’s gone from a resolution to more of a position paper running seven or eight pages,’ County Administrator Roman Gastesi said… ‘Restoration is very complex so we wanted more time to coordinate and collaborate with all the stakeholders like the Everglades Foundation and the Everglades Law Center,’ Gastesi said…The county’s expanded report will include more details on specific priorities among dozens of projects that make up the sprawling Everglades restoration plan.” Read County strengthening message to feds and state on speeding up Everglades restoration

    Bruce Ritchie reports for Politico Florida – “(Sen.) Flores said through her political committee that she is against drilling in Big Cypress and that she led Senate opposition this year to a bill that would have provided for regulation of oil and gas hydraulic fracturing. Environmental issues are emerging as a key re-election issue for Flores, a Republican from Miami whose new district includes a portion of Big Cypress and the left-leaning Florida Keys.” Read Flores, under fire, denounces drilling in sensitive areas

    Amy Green reports for WMFE – “D. Renee Wilson points beyond the sunbaked scrub toward an oak hammock not far away.  ‘It’s like a cathedral of branches,’ she says. Nearly every day she and her husband are on the Spring-to-Spring Trail where it skirts the north shore of Lake Monroe. This is among her favorite spots…Wilson was among several dozen who gathered Saturday to protest a proposal to transform this land into an “urban village,”…Mary Sue Scott organized the demonstration after her online petition opposing the development garnered more than 4,000 signatures… ‘It’s really frightening to think the chairman of this board that governs this agency that manages this land is trying to undo those protections, when in fact his own staff a few years ago…deemed this land to have high conservation value and needed to be protected with a conservation easement,’ [St. Johns Riverkeeper Executive Director Jimmy Orth] says.” Read DeBary Development Proposal for Conservation Land Sparks Controversy

    Sean Kinane reports for WMNF – “Environmentalists who support clean energy, oppose dirty fuels and say no to offshore drilling will join Hands Across the Sand this Saturday at beaches in Pinellas County and elsewhere.” Read/Listen to Art project will be part of Hands Across the Sand

    Niina Heikkinen and Climate Wire report for Scientific American – “In a sweeping 400-page report, the country’s top scientific group found there was not evidence to support claims that genetically modified organisms are dangerous for either the environment or human health.” Read Genetically Engineered Crops are Safe and Possibly Good for Climate Change

     

     

    From Our Readers

    The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

     



    Job Postings

    The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign


    Petitions

    Ask the SFWMD to deny the permit for the Crosstown Parkway that cuts through TWO State Preserves

    Save the Econlockhatchee River!

    Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

    Save Conservation Land Surrounding Gemini Springs

    Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

    Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

    Paynes Prairie in danger

    Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

    Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

     

    Making Connections

    Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

     

    Upcoming Environmental Events

    May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

    May 21, 11:00 am – Start or participate in a Hands Across the Sand event near you to Say No to Dirty Fuels and Yes to Clean Energy! For more information, click here.

    May 26, 6:00 pm – Attend Santa Rosa’s Board of County Commission Meeting in the board meeting room at 6495 Caroline Street in Milton. Share your opinions on the proposed RIB station near Williams Creek. For more information on this issue, click here.

    June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

    June 7, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs chemistry: General, nutrients, and trace contaminants. For more information, click here.

    June 18, 2:00 pm – Attend “Karst Environments in Florida and Geology of Fred George Basin,” a presentation by Harley Means (FLGS Geologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    June 25, 2:00 pm – Attend “The Beautiful Life of a Dead Tree: The Most Important Tree in the Woods,” a presentation by Jim Stevenson (Florida Springs Expert), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

     

     

     

    Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

    We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

    Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

    Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

    If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

    Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at .  

    About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

    For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - May 18, 2016

Posted by Gladys Delgadillo, Wednesday, May 18th, 2016 @ 9:39am

  • FCC News Brief

    Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

    May 18, 2016

     

    Kelly Baumgarten reports for WJHG – “In a unanimous vote commissioners banned fracking in Bay County.” Read Bay County Commissioners ban fracking

    Tyler Treadway reports for the TC Palm – “U.S. Sugar Corp in April launched a…media blitz- not to sell sugar, but to sell its positions on controversial Treasure Coast water issues…The ads purport to give “the facts” about the company’s relationship to Lake O, proposals to end lake discharges by moving excess water south, and the sources of water entering the St. Lucie River and Indian River Lagoon. Most of their statements are factual, but some are inaccurate, misleading or don’t tell the whole or relevant story. Here’s Our Indian River Lagoon team’s analysis of six statements we’re not buying.” Read U.S. Sugar ads don’t tell Treasure coast residents the whole truth

    Susan Salisbury reports for the Palm Beach Post – “Florida Power & Light Co. wants to charge customers another $22 million next year for two new nuclear reactors that might never be built, but it doesn’t want to conduct an analysis to determine whether the proposed $20 billion project still makes economic sense. Attorneys for the Office of Public Counsel, the Florida Industrial Power Users Group, the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy and the city of Miami have asked regulators to deny FPL’s request for an exemption for the required analysis.” Read Groups object to FPL’s Turkey Point nuclear study waiver request

    Karen Marcus writes for the Palm Beach Post – “[T]he Northern Palm Beach County Chamber of Commerce launched its open-for-business branding initiative – Palm Beach North: Florida’s Prosperity Coast. As someone who grew up here- and who spent years serving north county as a county commissioner- I support and applaud the chamber’s efforts. But it’s also important to point out that the very assets and resources that draw people to north county are under increasing attack, and we need to preserve them…My concern has led me to launch Sustainable Palm Beach County…We are for smart growth policies in four key areas: Land use: We encourage leaders to adopt and commit to sustainable land-use policies that preserve open space, farmland and critical environmental areas. We promote enhancement of green space…Water:…We’re running short….” Read Nonprofit’s mission is to encourage smart growth policies

    Jenny Staletovich reports for the Miami Herald – “Massive pumps that flush floodwater from Miami Beach into Biscayne Bay during seasonal king tides are dumping something else into the bay: human waste…Up and down the coast, as seas rise, more urban water is expected to be flushed into coastal waters, putting at risk one of the state’s biggest tourist draws.” Read Miami Beach king tides flush human waste into bay, study finds

    Jim Waymer reports for Florida Today – “More than 1 million gallons of raw sewage went into a canal that leads to the Banana River, after an old sewer pipe broke… ‘It’s 20-year-old pipe,’ said Don Walker, spokesman for Brevard County. ‘It’s kind of a problem we’ve got all over the country.’…[This] leak was the third major sewage incident the county has had this year. Brevard County must pay $4,100 in state civil penalties and investigation costs for two wastewater discharges in February – one that ultimately flowed to the St. Sebastian River, which empties into the Indian River Lagoon, and the other into a canal that flows to the St. Johns River…Brevard County is spending $134 million on a 10-year water and wastewater system improvements in a constant race against aging sewage infrastructure.” Read Spill sent 1M gallons of sewage toward Banana River

    Cindy Lerner and Jim Cason write for the Miami Herald – “Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi joined a lawsuit suing the EPA to stop the Clean Power Plan (CPP) from being enacted…Bondi claims it’s what the people of Florida want, yet the numbers prove the contrary. A poll…found that 73 percent of Florida voters support the CPP, which reveals Bondi is dramatically out of sync with her constituents.  Billions of dollars in coastal real estate, fragile ecosystems like the Everglades, and the vital economic engine of tourism make climate action plans like the CPP more crucial than ever. We’ve taken it upon ourselves to act locally…[W]e’ve also joined more than 50 cities- including 23 local governments in states where attorney generals are suing the EPA- in signing an amicus brief endorsing the CPP because cities can’t combat climate change alone.” Read Floridians support the Clean Power Plan

    Sean Kinane reports for WMNF – “Some local groups are joining with events across the country, uniting to demand labeling of genetically engineered food in what’s called March Against Monsanto.” Read/Listen to March Against Monsanto Tampa preview

     

     

    From Our Readers

    The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

     



    Job Postings

    The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign


    Petitions

    Ask the SFWMD to deny the permit for the Crosstown Parkway that cuts through TWO State Preserves

    Save the Econlockhatchee River!

    Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

    Save Conservation Land Surrounding Gemini Springs

    Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

    Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

    Paynes Prairie in danger

    Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

    Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

     

    Making Connections

    Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

     

    Upcoming Environmental Events

    May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

    May 21, 11:00 am – Start or participate in a Hands Across the Sand event near you to Say No to Dirty Fuels and Yes to Clean Energy! For more information, click here.

    May 26, 6:00 pm – Attend Santa Rosa’s Board of County Commission Meeting in the board meeting room at 6495 Caroline Street in Milton. Share your opinions on the proposed RIB station near Williams Creek. For more information on this issue, click here.

    June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

    June 7, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs chemistry: General, nutrients, and trace contaminants. For more information, click here.

    June 18, 2:00 pm – Attend “Karst Environments in Florida and Geology of Fred George Basin,” a presentation by Harley Means (FLGS Geologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    June 25, 2:00 pm – Attend “The Beautiful Life of a Dead Tree: The Most Important Tree in the Woods,” a presentation by Jim Stevenson (Florida Springs Expert), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

     

     

     

    Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

    We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

    Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

    Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

    If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

    Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.  

    About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

    For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - May 17, 2016

Posted by Gladys Delgadillo, Tuesday, May 17th, 2016 @ 9:29am

  • FCC News Brief

    Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

    May 17, 2016

     

     

    WEAR/Associated Press/ U.S. Coast Guard report for WEARTV – “Vessels are continuing to clean up an oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico after about 88,200 gallons of oil were released from a Shell flow line…Environmental groups said this latest spill was another example of why offshore drilling should be banned… ‘It’s unacceptable that oil spills have been permitted to become the status quo in the Gulf,’ said Michael Brune, the Sierra Club’s executive director… ‘We have allowed the region to be perpetually treated as a sacrifice zone.’…Spills happen every year in the Gulf. This new spill is classified as medium in size…Since 2012, there have been 147 spills and about 516,900 gallons of oil spilled in the Gulf…” Read Skimmers in Gulf continue to clean 88,200 gallon spill

    Jeff Burlew reports for the Tallahassee Democrat – “Florida wants to weaken its standards for roughly two dozen cancer-causing chemicals it will allow to be discharged into its rivers, lakes, streams and coastal waters…The agency is updating human-health criteria for 43 dangerous chemical compounds it regulates and adopting standards for the first time for another 39. Of the 82 various toxic substances, the vast majority would have lower standards than recommendations from the Environmental Protection Agency…Environmental groups are deeply suspicious the new standards are part of efforts to bring fracking to Florida. Allowable amounts of benzene, a well known carcinogen used in fracking and found in high levels in its waste water, would go up nearly three times…The state would leave unregulated several dozen toxic compounds on the EPA’s list of recommended criteria, including dioxin, a byproduct of pulp and paper mills that’s contaminated places like the Fenholloway River in Taylor County.” Read Public blasts DEP over new water toxin standards

    WTSP reports – “[T]wo Florida panthers were found dead…in southwest Florida…A total of 23 Florida panthers have been found dead in 2016, with 18 road fatalities.” Read 2 panthers killed in separate southwest Florida incidents

    Dinah Voyles Pulver reports for The Daytona Beach News-Journal – “More than 200 people showed up on a hot Saturday morning to protest a city of DeBary proposal to add more than 100 acres of conservation land to its plans for a development around the SunRail station.” Read Hundreds protest DeBary’s plans to build on conservation lands

    Harriet Heywood writes for the Citrus County Chronicle – “Sabal Trail Pipeline, LLC is attempting to cut its way through Alabama, Georgia, and Florida’s heartland, drilling under numerous rivers and wetlands in both Georgia and Florida, including the Suwannee and Santa Fe Rivers, and the Withlacoochee…with a dangerous compressor station nearby...[T]he Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has issued a certificate of convenience and necessity, but no notice for Sabal Trail to proceed with construction. There’s no permit from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, no Georgia Clean Water Act Section 401 water quality certificate, and Georgia voted 128-to-34 to deny river-drilling easements. Yet Sabal Trail is suing for federal eminent domain in Georgia and Florida. Major discrepancies between Sabal Trail reports to FERC on the geology and environment, and the reality on the ground where the pipelines are slated for development have surfaced…If we want a state or world worth passing on, we must stop extreme energy extractions and transition quickly to renewables.” Read Florida needs clean energy

    Amy Green reports for WMFE – “Scientists invited by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to weigh in on a proposal to reclassify the West Indian manatee as threatened rather than endangered are arguing against the change….All of the five…expressed concerns that, for instance, the proposal is not based on the best data… ‘Most of them have pointed out either some weakness…and some of them have come out and said we’re not sure you’re on the right track.’ Some of the scientists pointed out the proposal is based on out-of-date data that does not include a recent unexplained die-off of manatees in the Indian River Lagoon.” Read Manatee Experts Raise Concerns About Proposal to Reclassify Endangered Animal as Threatened

    June Fletcher reports for the Naples Daily News – “Balancing private rights with the public good as the region’s population explodes will be the future focus of the Conservancy of Southwest Florida, the group’s head said…Since 13 new towns are planned in these areas to the east of current development, preventing sprawl is…[a] major concern…Moher plans to continue to advocate clustering communities. One reason is that high-density communities are cheaper and easier to build and maintain; another is to minimize the impact on…wildlife…He also suggested more planning of infill and redevelopment to improve the commercial centers of places…to make them ‘really self-sustaining and successful cities before we create new cities,’ he said. Because new roads (or widened existing roads) create a threat to wildlife, increase runoff problems and are a burden for taxpayers to build and maintain, Moher is in favor of limiting them.” Read Rapid growth a threat to water, wetlands and wildlife, conservancy head says

    CBS4 reports – “Dozens of protesters demonstrated outside of a Florida Power & Light facility concerning leaks at the nuclear power plant at Turkey Point.” Read Demonstrators in Dade demand nuclear plant shut down after leaks

     

     

    From Our Readers

    The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

     



    Job Postings

    The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign


    Petitions

    Ask the SFWMD to deny the permit for the Crosstown Parkway that cuts through TWO State Preserves

    Save the Econlockhatchee River!

    Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

    Save Conservation Land Surrounding Gemini Springs

    Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

    Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

    Paynes Prairie in danger

    Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

    Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

     

    Making Connections

    Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

     

    Upcoming Environmental Events

    May 17, 12:00 pm – Attend Tri-County Working Group of Sierra Club’s meeting at the Crystal River Preserve State Park meeting room in Crystal River to discuss conservation issues of importance to Citrus, Levy, and Marion County residents. Following the meeting, the Education Committee will discuss progress on their new PPT presentation on solar energy for Florida. For more information, contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or .

    May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

    May 21, 11:00 am – Start or participate in a Hands Across the Sand event near you to Say No to Dirty Fuels and Yes to Clean Energy! For more information, click here.

    May 26, 6:00 pm – Attend Santa Rosa’s Board of County Commission Meeting in the board meeting room at 6495 Caroline Street in Milton. Share your opinions on the proposed RIB station near Williams Creek. For more information on this issue, click here.

    June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

    June 7, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs chemistry: General, nutrients, and trace contaminants. For more information, click here.

    June 18, 2:00 pm – Attend “Karst Environments in Florida and Geology of Fred George Basin,” a presentation by Harley Means (FLGS Geologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    June 25, 2:00 pm – Attend “The Beautiful Life of a Dead Tree: The Most Important Tree in the Woods,” a presentation by Jim Stevenson (Florida Springs Expert), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

     

     

     

    Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

    We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

    Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

    Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

    If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

    Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.  

    About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

    For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - May 16, 2016

Posted by Gladys Delgadillo, Monday, May 16th, 2016 @ 10:11am

  • FCC News Brief

    Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

    May 16, 2016

     

     

    Julie Hauserman writes for the Tampa Bay Times – “By the first week of May this year, 21 Florida panthers had been found dead, nearly all killed by vehicles. That’s more than…once a week. It’s a record. Florida panthers are one of the rarest animals on Earth, with an estimate of just 90 to 180 cats living, largely unseen, south of Lake Okeechobee. If the low end of this estimate is true, Florida drivers exterminated more than a fifth of the world’s panthers in just four months…[T]he brash forces of greed continue to outweigh the traditional notion of the commons; which is that we all, together, own natural resources and we have a moral obligation to protect those resources for future generations…Developers wheedle and pull their puppet master strings at county commissions, at state agencies and in the Legislature…As the bodies of dead panthers tragically pile up on our watch, should I say: We told you so? We told you this giant development, or that big road…would kill panthers?...Now on the table is a plan…to plan growth for the next 50 years on 152,000 acres in southwest Florida panther habitat – six times the size of Miami.” Read As Florida panthers die, we keep on developing wild Florida

    Sean Kinane reports for WMNF – “St. Petersburg City Council will soon consider an ordinance to ban…fracking and the transportation or storage of fracking wastewater within the city limits; Council vice chair Darden Rice says fracking for natural gas is too risky for St. Pete’s regional water supply, climate change and rising seas… ‘We need to be doing everything we can to lessen our dependency on fossil fuels. Continuing our dependency on oil and of fracking, only undermines our city’s best efforts to do climate action planning, resiliency planning…” Read St. Petersburg seeks ordinance to ban fracking

    Tyler Treadway reports for the TC Palm – “Lake Okeechobee discharges are continuing, blue-green algae blooms are threatening and Kilroy water sensors will be there to record it all. The Ocean Research & Conservation Association was poised to remove 15 of its 25 state-funded Kilroys from the St. Lucie River and Indian River Lagoon this summer, but Senate President Designate Joe Negron announced Thursday he has secured $500,000 to keep them all in the water through June 2017…With the original grant, the Legislature asked ORCA to determine how pollution is getting into the lagoon. To do that, the Kilroys have been equipped with sensors to measure pollutants earlier models couldn’t. One is blue-green algae…Others are nitrogen and phosphorus, the nutrients that feed the algae.” Read Sen. Joe Negron secures state funding to keep Kilroys in St. Lucie River, Indian River Lagoon

    Ledyard King reports for USA TODAY NETWORK – “Environmental projects in Florida got a significant boost from the Senate…with votes approving more than $100 million for Everglades restoration along with additional recovery money for Southwest Florida’s other distressed estuaries…The Indian River Lagoon also could receive some much-needed relief from a bill the Senate also passed…The measure…would authorize $26.5 million to help the nation’s 28 estuaries, and would provide extra funding to those in worst shape…The bill only reauthorizes the program. Congress still has to approve the money for it.” Read Florida environmental projects covered in Senate-passed bill

    Tim McDonell writes for Mother Jones – “The Environmental Protection Agency…released the final version of new federal rules intended to curb emissions of…[m]ethane….Methane emissions are far lower than carbon dioxide emissions, and methane survives in the atmosphere for a relatively short period of time. But methane is far more effective at trapping heat than CO2 is, which makes it a significant near-term warming threat…The lack of regulations on methane was one reason why President Barack Obama’s climate strategy, which hinges on swapping the country’s coal consumption for natural gas, has been frowned upon by some environmentalists. Even today’s regulations are only a partial solution, since they only apply to new and modified natural gas infrastructure, not systems that already exist.” Read Obama Just Cracked Down on Pollution From Fracking

    Andrea Grover writes for the Ocala Star Banner – “The Ocala Star-Banner recently published an editorial raising questions regarding the Sabal Trail Transmission, LLC…natural gas pipeline…As a representative of Sabal Trail, I would like to address these questions…Many large infrastructure projects, such as interstate highways, railroads, and cities, are already constructed through these same karst regions and have a much greater permanent impact and footprint than a pipeline…It is important to note that pipelines like Sabal Trail already exist in the area.” Read Sabal Trail: Pipeline poses no threat

    Kara Moses writes for The Guardian – “Right now, thousands of people are taking direct action as part of a global wave of protests against the biggest fossil fuel infrastructure projects across the world. We kicked off earlier this month by shutting down the UK’s largest opencast coal mine in south Wales. Last Sunday, around 1,000 people closed the world’s largest coal-exporting port in Newcastle, Australia and other bold actions are happening at power stations, oil refineries, pipelines and mines everywhere from the Philippines, Brazil and the US, to Nigeria, Germany and India…With so many governments still dependent on a fossil fuel economy, they can’t be relied upon to make the radical change required in the time we need to make it….[I]f we really want climate justice, protest in the pursuit of this must be normalized; we must support rather than denounce those willing to put themselves on the line, since we all benefit from their actions…[A]s 2017 is said to be the year when the door to reach two degrees closes forever, now is the time to do it. This year must be the year of mass climate disobedience.” Read Civil disobedience is the only way left to fight climate change

    We Believers shares– “Most of these plastic six-pack rings end up in our oceans and pose a serious threat to wildlife. Together with Saltwater Brewery, a small craft beer brand in Florida…[w]e…designed…and manufactured Edible Six Pack rings. A six-pack packaging design that instead of killing animals, feeds them.” Watch Saltwater Brewery “Edible Six Pack Rings”

     

     

    From Our Readers

    The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

     



    Job Postings

    The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


    Petitions

    Ask the SFWMD to deny the permit for the Crosstown Parkway that cuts through TWO State Preserves

    Save the Econlockhatchee River!

    Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

    Save Conservation Land Surrounding Gemini Springs

    Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

    Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

    Paynes Prairie in danger

    Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

    Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

     

    Making Connections

    Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

     

    Upcoming Environmental Events

    May 17, 12:00 pm – Attend Tri-County Working Group of Sierra Club’s meeting at the Crystal River Preserve State Park meeting room in Crystal River to discuss conservation issues of importance to Citrus, Levy, and Marion County residents. Following the meeting, the Education Committee will discuss progress on their new PPT presentation on solar energy for Florida. For more information, contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or .

    May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

    May 21, 11:00 am – Start or participate in a Hands Across the Sand event near you to Say No to Dirty Fuels and Yes to Clean Energy! For more information, click here.

    May 26, 6:00 pm – Attend Santa Rosa’s Board of County Commission Meeting in the board meeting room at 6495 Caroline Street in Milton. Share your opinions on the proposed RIB station near Williams Creek. For more information on this issue, click here.

    June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

    June 7, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs chemistry: General, nutrients, and trace contaminants. For more information, click here.

    June 18, 2:00 pm – Attend “Karst Environments in Florida and Geology of Fred George Basin,” a presentation by Harley Means (FLGS Geologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    June 25, 2:00 pm – Attend “The Beautiful Life of a Dead Tree: The Most Important Tree in the Woods,” a presentation by Jim Stevenson (Florida Springs Expert), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

     

     

     

     

    Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

    We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

    Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

    Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

    If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

    Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at 

    About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

    For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - May 13, 2016

Posted by Gladys Delgadillo, Friday, May 13th, 2016 @ 9:39am

  • FCC News Brief

    Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

    May 13, 2016

     

     

    Tyler Treadway reports for the TC Palm – “Army Corps of Engineers officials said they will ‘consider’ a blue-green algae bloom stretching over several square miles in southern Lake Okeechobee when deciding whether to continue discharging excess lake water into the St. Lucie River…Technically a bacteria, [blue-green algae] uses…photosynthesis…It shades and kills sea grass. Toxins in the algae can kill small animals…Animals that hunt for food in water can’t see their prey through the algae. When the algae dies, it’s eaten by bacteria that use up all the oxygen in the water, which can lead to fish kills. …Microcystis contains toxins that can make humans and animals sick…New studies suggest…a link between a toxin in blue-green algae and neurological diseases…Swimming…in a bloom can cause skin irritation…Inhaling toxins can cause hay feverlike symptoms…[C]hildren and pets are at greater risk for poisoning.” Read Is Lake Okeechobee blue-green algae bloom a toxic threat to St. Lucie River? And to see video of the bloom, click here.

    Greg Stanley reports for the Naples Daily News – “The state of Florida will move forward with plans to preserve about 2.5 square miles of prime panther habitat and ranch land in eastern Collier County even without federal help…The U.S. Department of Agriculture had planned to pay $1.5 million of the cost when the deal was first negotiated…but backed out before closing…JB Ranch is owned and operated by Liesa Priddy (Vice-Chair of FWC Commission)… ‘Cattle ranches are very compatible to panther habitat,’ said Brad Cornell of the Audubon Society of the Western Everglades. ‘The challenge is that the cats eat young calves…But we need to keep these ranches, rather than convert them to more intensive row crops or houses or mines.’ The land deal does not include mineral rights beneath the surface, meaning oil under the easement could be drilled horizontally from neighboring properties.” Read Florida agrees to pay another $1.5 million for ranch land owned by Scott appointee for panther habitat

    Conrad Defiebre reports for the TC Palm – “Half of the green turtles assessed in the Indian River Lagoon for decades have [fibropappillomatosis], which can kill them if it impedes their ability to see and eat…[I]t’s been studied by scientists for nearly 80 years, (but) a full understanding of its cause has eluded them. A major suspect, however, is polluted lagoon environments where marine turtles spend part of their lives… ‘We may ultimately come to find that prevention and cure lie in proper treatment of stormwater runoff,’ Hawaiian researchers…wrote…‘Discovering the cause of FP in sea turtles and addressing that cause may therefore lead to more responsible development and cleaner oceans for all marine life.’” Read Pollution suspected in tumor disease that kills Indian River Lagoon sea turtles

    Joe Romm writes for Think Progress – “[C]limate science and…politics have been moving unexpectedly quickly toward a broad consensus that we need to keep total…global warming…ideally to no more than 1.5°C…But,…we are already at roughly 1°C warming (as of 2015) and rapidly approaching 1.5°C…The reality of the climate challenge is that only technologies that can be deployed at trillion-dollar scale in the next three decades can contribute to slashing CO2 by mid-century…[T]he technology development and deployment cycle is simply far too long for a technology that doesn’t exist today to plausibly make a vital contribution to cutting CO2 by mid-century…R&D remains as important…in providing options for the post-2050 world (which must go carbon-negative to achieve stabilization of 1.5°C)… ‘Globally, deployment costs will be in the trillions of dollars, while R&D costs might be in the tens of billions.’…In the 1.5C case, we…need to get power-sector emissions to zero before 2050. Fortunately…this is quite straightforward using technologies that are commercial today…And that means successful deployment policies such as utility mandates for renewables are vital…[I]n the 1.5C case…government policies must enable an orderly but rapid shutdown of coal plants (and then gas plants) while simultaneously replacing them with a combination of renewables, nuclear power, and energy efficiency. So, you can’t just have any CO2 price- you need one that starts out at a moderate to high level and rises quite rapidly.Read Almost Everything You Know About Climate Change Solutions is Outdated, Part 1

    Paul Guzzo reports for the Tampa Bay Times – “For more than 50 years, the broken political relationship between the United States and Cuba kept them from working together to protect the Gulf of Mexico from an oil spill. That could be the next thing to change in this new age of normalized relations…An accord would…be critical to protecting the Florida coastline because Cuba could allow offshore drilling in 18 months. An oil spill in Cuban waters could reach the Florida Keys in less than a week.” Read Experts: U.S. and Cuba on verge of historic oil spill accord

    Julie Gargotta reports for News 13 – “More water tests in the Wedgefield community of Orange County show high levels of [TTHM]…The community is dependent upon drinking water from Pluris, a private water and wastewater utility company…Long-term TTHM exposure has been linked to certain types of cancers…Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs said: ‘…Pluris is not under the jurisdiction of Orange County Government, instead it is regulated by the State of Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the State of Florida Public Service Commission…[W]e conducted initial testing. We have alerted the [FDEP] of the…findings…Based on these results, the [FDEP] will decide what action to take to correct the situation.’” Read Orange County: Only state can handle Wedgefield water problems

    Jim Rosica reports for Florida Politics – “A former member of the Florida Environmental Regulation Commission said the group doesn’t have ‘jack’ to do. That’s why the commission – charged with reviewing rules to protect the state’s environment – hardly ever meets…A review of the commission’s meeting schedule for this year shows all of its monthly meetings from January to June have been cancelled…There’s no meeting scheduled for July. The August meeting is set as ‘TBD.’…The former commissioner…recalls two meetings being called in one two-year stretch…The commission is a ‘non-salaried, seven-member board selected by the Governor…’” Read Environmental Review Board Doesn’t Have Much to Do

    Kevin Spear reports for the Orlando Sentinel – “One of the nation’s most endangered birds, a rare sparrow found only in Central Florida, took a step away from potential extinction this week with the unprecedented hatching of four chicks in captivity.” Read Rare Central Florida sparrows hatch in captivity

     

     

    From Our Readers

    The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

     



    Job Postings

    The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


    Petitions

    Ask the SFWMD to deny the permit for the Crosstown Parkway that cuts through TWO State Preserves

    Save the Econlockhatchee River!

    Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

    Save Conservation Land Surrounding Gemini Springs

    Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

    Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

    Paynes Prairie in danger

    Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

    Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

     

    Making Connections

    Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

     

    Upcoming Environmental Events

    May 14, 9:00 am – Participate in Troy Springs Float Cleanup Down to Little River. You will need to have your own boat (canoes and power boats are both useful). Bring food and water, and let Fritzi Olson know if you can attend by May 12th. You can contact her at aar@currentproblems.org.

    May 14, 10:00 am – Attend the Trail Walk for Awareness to Save Gemini Springs Conservation Land at Gemini Springs Park in DeBary. The City of DeBary has planned to acquire conservation land between Gemini Springs and Lake Monroe with the goal of developing a master stormwater system, multifamily and single family housing, commercial and lodging. This land was acquired as mitigation for environmental damage during Interstate 4 construction. For more information, click here.

    May 14, 2:00 pm – Attend “Long Leaf Pine- Restoring Fred George Basin’s ecosystem,” a presentation by Tom Ostertag (FWC Imperiled Species Biologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    May 17, 12:00 pm – Attend Tri-County Working Group of Sierra Club’s meeting at the Crystal River Preserve State Park meeting room in Crystal River to discuss conservation issues of importance to Citrus, Levy, and Marion County residents. Following the meeting, the Education Committee will discuss progress on their new PPT presentation on solar energy for Florida. For more information, contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

    May 21, 11:00 am – Start or participate in a Hands Across the Sand event near you to Say No to Dirty Fuels and Yes to Clean Energy! For more information, click here.

    May 26, 6:00 pm – Attend Santa Rosa’s Board of County Commission Meeting in the board meeting room at 6495 Caroline Street in Milton. Share your opinions on the proposed RIB station near Williams Creek. For more information on this issue, click here.

    June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

    June 7, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs chemistry: General, nutrients, and trace contaminants. For more information, click here.

    June 18, 2:00 pm – Attend “Karst Environments in Florida and Geology of Fred George Basin,” a presentation by Harley Means (FLGS Geologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    June 25, 2:00 pm – Attend “The Beautiful Life of a Dead Tree: The Most Important Tree in the Woods,” a presentation by Jim Stevenson (Florida Springs Expert), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

    We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

    Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

    Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

    If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

    Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com

    About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

    For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - May 12, 2016

Posted by Gladys Delgadillo, Thursday, May 12th, 2016 @ 8:55am

  • FCC News Brief

    Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

    May 12, 2016

     

    Diane Roberts writes for Context Florida – “You’d think that a state where they launch rockets into space, a state which houses the world’s most powerful superconducting magnets, a state with several perfectly good universities, would embrace science. Or at least not be so thoroughly hostile to it. But this is Rick Scott’s Florida…Under the circumstances, you will not be shocked to hear that the state is using bad science to decide on permits for water use…[T]he state knows that its models are rubbish…The state shrugs and says they ‘tweak’ the models…Here’s how well that’s doing: The flow in many Florida springs has slowed or stopped altogether….[I]f DEP and the water management districts use correct scientific information, they might have to stop throwing permits like Mardi Gras beads to the drain-and-pave crowd or the barons of Big Ag…Good science might force DEP to stop pimping out Florida’s environment. And that would never do.” Read Bad Science is Not Good for State’s Waterways

    Naples Daily News Editorial Board writes – “Passion for the Florida panther was evident…when a federal agency held a public hearing on a proposed habitat conservation plan for a big-city-sized spread in northeastern Collier County…Clutching a stuffed wild cat after she spoke was Megan Sorbo, a 10-year-old…It was the 50-year nature of the landowners’ request that she labeled ‘absolutely outrageous.’ ‘My generation deserves the right to make decisions for our own generation,’ she said. A consultant for landowners gave a presentation, explaining no more than 45,000 of the 152,124 acres would be developed with 107,000 acres set aside for conservation and to provide links for wildlife to move from one area to another. Importantly, that includes a way for the Florida panther to move north from the…national panther refuge and eventually across the Caloosahatchee River where it can expand its habitat and breed more cats…Despite a voter-approved revenue source, a pittance of what used to be $300 million a year for Florida Forever purchases is being allocated by the state; some prime panther habitat remains on the unfunded list…[W]here have the voices been concerning the county letting its Conservation Collier program expire in 2013?” Read Are there species protection questions not being addressed?

    Scott Wyland reports for the TC Palm – “There are nearly 300,000 septic tanks in the five Indian River Lagoon-bordering counties. Volusia: 99,257 Brevard: 90,973 Indian River: 36,894 St. Lucie: 4,113, Martin: 28,375…Researchers at Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute…have found sewage contaminating the entire 156-mile lagoon…Despite growing evidence that septic tanks play a role in the lagoon’s degradation, most elected leaders are hesitant to tackle this part of the problem, largely because many property owners oppose increased septic regulations…As many as half (of the septic tanks) were installed before stricter regulations were enacted in 1983…Aside from nutrients…sewage also contains coliform bacteria, viruses, prescription drugs and anything else flushed down the toilet…” Read Investigation: Move over fertilizer; septic tank drainage also contaminating Indian River Lagoon

    Jenny Staletovich reports for the Miami Herald – “Records show FPL had been warned for years about problems and even conducted its own research in 2010 that concluded its key fix – adding millions of gallons of brackish water to freshen the super salty canals- would likely make the plume worse. After overheated canals forced the plant’s two reactors to partially power down in 2014, the utility pushed state regulators and water managers repeatedly to add more water, solutions that would allow it to continue operating under Nuclear Regulatory Commission limits but potentially increase the extent and speed of saltwater seepage from the unlined canals…County Commissioner Dennis Moss…asked the Environmental Protection Agency to weigh in, joining Rep. Jose Javier Rodriguez…Worsening conditions have also caught the attention of Monroe County, which operates its only wellfield west of the canals. The county…is considering buying land further west to relocate its well field as well as build an additional reverse osmosis plant in Key West…” Read Evidence of salt plume under Turkey Point nuclear plant goes back years

    Kathy Prucnell reports for The Islander – “The first appellate brief in the ongoing battle to halt wetlands development on the mangrove-lined Perico Island shores is on the books in the 5th District Court of Appeal…The brief also seeks attorneys’ fees and costs under a state statute that makes such an award mandatory if the court finds an agency improperly rejected or modified a recommended administrative order… ‘We hope the 5th DCA will overturn the political decision by the governing board,’ wrote Brookes, attorney for FISH, former Manatee County Commissioner Joe McClash, Suncoast Waterkeeper, Sierra Club and Manasota-88…” Read Environmentalists challenge Neal development in 5th DCA

    Kevin Wadlow reports for Keys Info Net – “A planned no-fishing zone in Biscayne National Park could be undone by Congress. U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio [and] Sen. Bill Cassidy this week filed a Senate bill called the Preserving Public Access to Public Waters Act that puts the…marine reserve in its crosshairs. The Senate bill largely tracks the U.S. House of Representatives’ “Sportsmen’s Heritage and Recreational Enhancement Act” that passed a full House vote…The House bill, whose sponsors include…U.S. Reps. Carlos Curbelo…and Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, includes a provision that state fish and wildlife regulators can block a federal fishing closure lying within state waters.” Read Congressional bills aim to kill Biscayne National Park’s protected no-fishing zone

    April Warren reports for The Gainesville Sun – “County commissioners asked the county attorney…to work on a resolution to ban bear hunts on Alachua County lands. Commissioner Ken Cornell suggested the resolution, citing public opinion polls mostly suggest the public is against hunting bears. The motion passed 4-1…” Read County leaders hope for bear-hunt ban

    Jim Turner reports for The News Service of Florida – “The state is picking up $1.5 million that the federal government had been expected to contribute to a deal to conserve 1,617 acres of ranch land and panther habitat in eastern Collier County…As closing (of the deal) neared, the [U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service] raised objections about language in the deal because the state did not acquire all of the mineral rights on the land. Federal officials were concerned that could allow horizontal drilling, which is often used for extracting natural gas…Funding for the land is slated to come from the state’s Rural and Family Lands Protection Program…The land sits north of the Big Cypress National Preserve and east of the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge.” Read State picks up feds’ portion of ranch deal

     

     

    From Our Readers

    The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

     



    Job Postings

    The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


    Petitions

    Ask the SFWMD to deny the permit for the Crosstown Parkway that cuts through TWO State Preserves

    Save the Econlockhatchee River!

    Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

    Save Conservation Land Surrounding Gemini Springs

    Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

    Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

    Paynes Prairie in danger

    Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

    Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

     

    Making Connections

    Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

     

    Upcoming Environmental Events

    May 14, 9:00 am – Participate in Troy Springs Float Cleanup Down to Little River. You will need to have your own boat (canoes and power boats are both useful). Bring food and water, and let Fritzi Olson know if you can attend by May 12th. You can contact her at aar@currentproblems.org.

    May 14, 10:00 am – Attend the Trail Walk for Awareness to Save Gemini Springs Conservation Land at Gemini Springs Park in DeBary. The City of DeBary has planned to acquire conservation land between Gemini Springs and Lake Monroe with the goal of developing a master stormwater system, multifamily and single family housing, commercial and lodging. This land was acquired as mitigation for environmental damage during Interstate 4 construction. For more information, click here.

    May 14, 2:00 pm – Attend “Long Leaf Pine- Restoring Fred George Basin’s ecosystem,” a presentation by Tom Ostertag (FWC Imperiled Species Biologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    May 17, 12:00 pm – Attend Tri-County Working Group of Sierra Club’s meeting at the Crystal River Preserve State Park meeting room in Crystal River to discuss conservation issues of importance to Citrus, Levy, and Marion County residents. Following the meeting, the Education Committee will discuss progress on their new PPT presentation on solar energy for Florida. For more information, contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

    May 21, 11:00 am – Start or participate in a Hands Across the Sand event near you to Say No to Dirty Fuels and Yes to Clean Energy! For more information, click here.

    May 26, 6:00 pm – Attend Santa Rosa’s Board of County Commission Meeting in the board meeting room at 6495 Caroline Street in Milton. Share your opinions on the proposed RIB station near Williams Creek.

    June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

    June 7, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs chemistry: General, nutrients, and trace contaminants. For more information, click here.

    June 18, 2:00 pm – Attend “Karst Environments in Florida and Geology of Fred George Basin,” a presentation by Harley Means (FLGS Geologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    June 25, 2:00 pm – Attend “The Beautiful Life of a Dead Tree: The Most Important Tree in the Woods,” a presentation by Jim Stevenson (Florida Springs Expert), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

    We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

    Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

    Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

    If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

    Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com

    About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

    For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - May 11, 2016

Posted by Gladys Delgadillo, Wednesday, May 11th, 2016 @ 8:38am

  • FCC News Brief

    Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

    May 11, 2016

     

    The Gainesville Sun Editorial Board writes – “The proposed Sabal Trail natural gas pipeline would traverse 30 miles of western Marion County and travel within less than a mile of Rainbow Springs and then go under the Withlacoochee River. Yet, according to a letter sent to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers by the Marion County Commission, local officials ‘are unable to find specific details associated with (Sabal Trail’s) analysis of the Marion County portion of the project.’…[T]he commission is asking the Corps to conduct an ‘independent supplemental environmental impact statement’ to answer a litany of questions about the… project…Marion County wants to know…how [the pipeline] would react to a sinkhole collapse underneath it…[and] what plans Sabal Trail has for protecting the wetlands and dozens of threatened or endangered species living in the Marjorie Harris Carr Cross Florida Greenway…Sabal Trail has offered no specifics for how damage… ‘will be avoided or mitigated.’ That the Sabal Trail pipeline…has received numerous governmental approvals, including from our…Florida Department of Environmental Protection, and such questions have yet to be answered is troubling…Sabal Trail insists it is seeking to use existing rights of way wherever possible, yet it is cutting through largely rural, environmentally sensitive western Marion County. It hardly seems the least intrusive place to put a pipeline…We urge the Army Corps to undertake the supplemental environmental review and the Marion County Commission to watchdog the process to ensure…questions are answered.” Read Answers needed on Sabal Trail

    Warren Wright reports for Fox 4 – “Lake Okeechobee could be ground zero for diseases like Alzheimer’s and ALS. Blue green algae blooms…are getting more common, primarily due to all the fertilizer dumped into Lake Okeechobee, which feeds the blooms. And that algae is putting out a toxin known as BMAA…[F]ish samples in the Caloosahatchee…proved to be loaded with BMAA…In a recent study of five dolphins (in the Indian River Lagoon) that died for no apparent reason, they showed abnormal amounts of BMAA in brain tissue samples… ‘I personally would not eat any of the seafood from those locations,’ says Dr. Brand.” Read Are algae blooms bad for the brain?

    Bruce Ritchie reports for Politico Florida – “The biggest barrier for solar energy in Florida had always been the cost. But that’s changing as the price of solar continues to drop, making it as cheap – or cheaper- as traditional sources of electricity generation. Florida utilities are taking advantage of the lower costs.” Read Florida utilities move toward solar energy as price drops

    Eric Staats reports for the Naples Daily News – “Conservation groups are considering their legal options in the wake of a final sign-off by the National Park Service on a Texas company to look for oil in the Big Cypress National Preserve…After a nearly two-year review that triggered protests and political maneuvers, federal regulators issued a finding…that the work would have “no significant impact” on the preserve’s forests and wet prairies or the wildlife that live there, including endangered Florida panthers…Before it can start seismic testing, the company must formally agree to follow various measures meant to lessen environmental damage…Oil exploration, even drilling, is nothing new in the Big Cypress preserve…” Read Conservationists consider legal options to fight seismic testing for oil in Big Cypress National Preserve

    Sheldon Gardner reports for The St. Augustine Record – “Attorney Jane West…is asking the city (of St. Augustine) to consider prohibiting the sale of helium-filled balloons and other balloons filled with ‘lighter-than-air gases,’…Whether they’re released intentionally or they slip out of someone’s grasp, balloons sometimes end their journey in the ocean. There they become a hazard to sea turtles, which can mistake them for jellyfish, and other wildlife. When animals ingest them, they can die…[T]he idea has received letters of support from the Florida Wildlife Federation and the Center for Biological Diversity… ‘…[R]esearchers have documented that when helium balloons reach the ocean, sea turtles selectively feed on them…In other words, the attractive floating bundles are more likely to become food than actual food.’” Read St. Augustine Beach to discuss possible ordinance on nixing sale of helium baloons

    Tyler Treadway reports for the TC Palm – “Within a week, the state officially will take control of the Ten Mile Creek Water Preserve Area; and in about a year, the problem-plagued reservoir should be 4 feet deep.” Read South Florida water district officially to take charge of Ten Mile Creek project

    David Gonzalez reports for WEARTV – “Residents in a Navarre neighborhood are upset about a proposed plan that could dump treated wastewater into Williams Creek… ‘We are in a flood zone,’ [one resident] said. ‘Their answer to the fact that we’re concerned about flooding was that, ‘Well you’re in a flood zone and you’re going to flood anyway.’’…[A homeowner] believes property values will be impacted…Santa Rosa County commissioners decided to table the issue after hearing from the Holley-Navarre Water Company, and residents for and against building a RIB station…This issue will be heard during the commission’s next meeting on May 26 at 6 p.m.” Read Navarre residents upset over wastewater plan

    Linda Young writes for The Panhandle Politico – “I just learned…of the proposal by Holley-Navarre Water System to exercise the use of their reuse permit for two RIB systems on property adjacent to Williams Creek here in Navarre…I am extremely concerned and opposed to the proposal and request that you look for other more suitable locations for disposal of waste water from the HNWS WWTP and potentially from the Navarre Beach WWTP…[F]rom my 25 years of working on water quality in Florida I know that there are several obvious problems that merit your scrutiny and ultimate rejection of this plan…Williams Creek is already impaired due to the development that has been permitted in its watershed, particularly the wetland areas.” Read Holly-Navarre wastewater dumping will worsen Sound pollution

     

     

    From Our Readers

    The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

     



    Job Postings

    The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


    Petitions

    Ask the SFWMD to deny the permit for the Crosstown Parkway that cuts through TWO State Preserves

    Save the Econlockhatchee River!

    Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

    Save Conservation Land Surrounding Gemini Springs

    Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

    Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

    Paynes Prairie in danger

    Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

    Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

     

    Making Connections

    Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

     

    Upcoming Environmental Events

    May 11, 12:00 pm – Listen to “Ethics in Leadership Development for the Planner,” a 1000 Friends of Florida webinar covering the ethics requirements of the American Institute of Certified planners and how these interface with Florida’s ethics laws. Emphasis will be placed on ethics as it relates to leadership and common ethics traps. For more information and to register, click here.

    May 11, 6:00 pm – Attend Ales and Wild Tails at The Ale and Witch in St. Petersburg. Florida’s global importance as a nesting site for sea turtles will be discussed.  This is the first of a new speaker series hosted by the Center for Biological Diversity. For more information, click here or here.

    May 14, 9:00 am – Participate in Troy Springs Float Cleanup Down to Little River. You will need to have your own boat (canoes and power boats are both useful). Bring food and water, and let Fritzi Olson know if you can attend by May 12th. You can contact her at aar@currentproblems.org.

    May 14, 10:00 am – Attend the Trail Walk for Awareness to Save Gemini Springs Conservation Land at Gemini Springs Park in DeBary. The City of DeBary has planned to acquire conservation land between Gemini Springs and Lake Monroe with the goal of developing a master stormwater system, multifamily and single family housing, commercial and lodging. This land was acquired as mitigation for environmental damage during Interstate 4 construction. For more information, click here.

    May 14, 2:00 pm – Attend “Long Leaf Pine- Restoring Fred George Basin’s ecosystem,” a presentation by Tom Ostertag (FWC Imperiled Species Biologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    May 17, 12:00 pm – Attend Tri-County Working Group of Sierra Club’s meeting at the Crystal River Preserve State Park meeting room in Crystal River to discuss conservation issues of importance to Citrus, Levy, and Marion County residents. Following the meeting, the Education Committee will discuss progress on their new PPT presentation on solar energy for Florida. For more information, contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

    May 21, 11:00 am – Start or participate in a Hands Across the Sand event near you to Say No to Dirty Fuels and Yes to Clean Energy! For more information, click here.

    May 26, 6:00 pm – Attend Santa Rosa’s Board of County Commission Meeting in the board meeting room at 6495 Caroline Street in Milton. Share your opinions on the proposed RIB station near Williams Creek.

    June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

    June 7, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs chemistry: General, nutrients, and trace contaminants. For more information, click here.

    June 18, 2:00 pm – Attend “Karst Environments in Florida and Geology of Fred George Basin,” a presentation by Harley Means (FLGS Geologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    June 25, 2:00 pm – Attend “The Beautiful Life of a Dead Tree: The Most Important Tree in the Woods,” a presentation by Jim Stevenson (Florida Springs Expert), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

    We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

    Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

    Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

    If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

    Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com

    About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

    For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - May 10, 2016

Posted by Gladys Delgadillo, Tuesday, May 10th, 2016 @ 9:59am

  • FCC News Brief

    Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

    May 10, 2016

     

    Lucinda Faulkner Merritt writes for The Gainesville Sun – “When there is scientific disagreement, we must remember that science was never designed to make decisions for us…[W]hen it comes to making important decisions that affect our drinking water, we must consider not only science but also our ethical, moral and legal obligations to each other, to our children and to the natural world that sustains life. One guideline is the precautionary principle: When in doubt- given different scientific opinions about the damage that could be inflicted on a natural system…we should choose the most conservative course of action guaranteed to cause the least amount of damage…Leadership on statewide mandated water conservation by everyone…is missing in action…U.S. laws have been stacked in favor of business and commerce since the time the Constitution was written. Rather than protecting our natural systems, our current environmental laws codify how much harm we are willing to allow them…[W]e must level the playing field in courts of law between business/commerce and the natural systems needed to sustain life…[T]he Ichetucknee and Santa Fe rivers might be better protected if our courts recognized their legal rights to exist and if they had official guardians to represent them in court…Our water problems are political problems. Elections matter because water matters. It’s our collective responsibility to educate ourselves…Vote for water in 2016.” Read Our water problems are political problems

    Kevin Spear reports for the Orlando Sentinel – “Patricia Siemen…is a lawyer, Dominican sister and director of the Center for Earth Jurisprudence at Barry University’s law school…She…is resigning from the center, which she founded a decade ago…Sister Pat spoke to the Orlando Sentinel about the good, bad and hopeful in Florida’s environment…What makes you optimistic about Florida’s environment? I am optimistic about collaboration with different environmental groups, including the Florida Conservation Coalition and Floridians’ Clean Water Declaration Campaign. This moves us beyond having just Sierra Club issues versus Friends of the Wekiva versus Audubon versus the springs groups. This unified front is needed given dire concerns in Florida…What worries you the most? Unlimited growth. We no longer have the Department of Community Affairs to provide support to local governments to give them backbone and protection to control growth. We have an increasing population in a fragile environment and an attitude that does not seem to recognize that Earth has restraints and certain capacities. At the same time, we have climate change upon us.” Read Sister Pat: Spiritual and legal fight for environment, retiring

    Kurt Repanshek reports for National Parks Traveler – “[T]he National Park Service has given the go-ahead for an oil company to explore for deposits beneath Big Cypress National Preserve in Florida, even though the company’s test of its equipment was judged ‘clearly a failure’ by park observers. ‘I have honestly never been as disappointed in the Park Service as I am right now. It defies logic, that during the (Park Service) centennial and with (Interior) Secretary Jewell just down there, that they would bend over backwards to make it as easy for this oil company to do whatever they want inside a national park,’ Nick Lund, the National Parks Conservation Association’s point man on the issue, said… ‘There’s nine threatened and endangered species within the planning area, including the critically endangered Florida panther…I don’t know what NEPA (the National Environmental Policy Act) exists for if not for this thing.’” Read National Park Service Approves Seismic Testing for Oil in Big Cypress National Preserve

    Frank Bumb reports for News-Press – “[A] Florida Governmental Utility [Authority wants] to dig a shallow injection well to remove surplus treated wastewater from its North Fort Myers plant…That’s a  problem, Cape Coral officials said, because that well would only go down about 1,800 feet in the Avon Park aquifer level, near where the city obtains its drinking water. ‘We’re already seeing upward migration of saltier water from the Avon Park aquifer,’ Utilities Director Jeff Pearson said…Injecting additional treated wastewater…could increase the pressure enough to force additional saltier water up to where the city gets its drinking water. That would increase the costs to treat the water for human consumption by millions of dollars…Szlerag (Cape Coral City Manager) said there also is a danger…of…treated effluent getting into the city’s drinking water supply and contaminating it… ‘This is stuff that’s watering parks on the surface that kids play on…’ Spratt (FGUA Project Manager) said. ‘…We don’t want our ratepayers to have to have the cost of another $2 million to achieve some small security.’ Spratt also said the water could help recharge the Avon Park aquifer…The city council voted 8-0…to file a petition for an administrative hearing where it can raise its objections about the well to the DEP.” Read Cape Coal objects to North Fort Myers injection well

    The Center for Biological Diversity shares – “The Center for Biological Diversity and Pesticide Action Network North America are challenging the Environmental Protection Agency’s systemic failure to assess the impacts of more than 30 pesticides known to be harmful to dozens of endangered species found across the country…including Florida panthers…Despite well-documented risks of pesticides to imperiled wildlife, for decades the EPA has “registered” pesticides for use in the United States without conducting legally required Endangered Species Act consultations with expert federal wildlife agencies to determine whether the pesticides will harm protected wildlife. This failure prevents the Fish and Wildlife Service and National Marine Fisheries Service from…restricting pesticide uses known to be harmful to protected plants and animals.” Read Court Hearing Will Focus on EPA’s Failure to Protect Nation’s Endangered Wildlife from Pesticides

    A Quinton White writes for The Florida Times Union – “’What can I do to make a difference and help save the St. Johns River?’…The answer is relatively simple…You can take care of your own mess…and try to think about what and how you use things like water, energy and fertilizer…Another way is to join a group…Be it a civic club, like Kiwanis or Rotary, or a garden club…or a more focused organization like the St. Johns Riverkeeper or Sierra Club. Each has its own role, and you can be as active as you choose.” Read River Life: Individually or together, you can help the St. Johns River

    Marv Balousek reports for Villages News  - “Opposition to a proposed water bottling operation in Sumter County has spawned a Villages group against the project…More than 200 emails and letters in opposition…have been sent to the State Water Use Permit Bureau…and an overflow crowd objecting to the project attended a March meeting of the Sumter county Commission… ‘The applicant has not demonstrated a need for the water,’ Villager Michael Schobinger said at [a state-sponsored public] meeting. ‘There is plenty of bottled water on supermarket shelves.’ He also said the pumping could damage Belton’s Millpond and spring…and that an engineering firm found a hydrologic connection between the spring and drilling site.” Read Villagers opposed to water bottling plan organizing efforts to block permit

    Craig Pittman reports for the Tampa Bay Times – “In…areas of Hillsborough, Pasco, Pinellas and Hernando counties, people have repeatedly gunned down hawks, ospreys, herons and other bird species that are protected under the law…[R]aptors like… red-shouldered hawks are…covered by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918…which carries a top penalty of a $500 fine and six months behind bars. Statewide, red-shouldered hawks have been the most frequent illegal targets.” Read Illegal shootings of hawks, ospreys and herons persist in Tampa Bay

     

     

    From Our Readers

    The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

     



    Job Postings

    The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


    Petitions

    Save the Econlockhatchee River!

    Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

    Save Conservation Land Surrounding Gemini Springs

    Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

    Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

    Paynes Prairie in danger

    Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

    Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

     

    Making Connections

    Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

     

    Upcoming Environmental Events

    May 11, 12:00 pm – Listen to “Ethics in Leadership Development for the Planner,” a 1000 Friends of Florida webinar covering the ethics requirements of the American Institute of Certified planners and how these interface with Florida’s ethics laws. Emphasis will be placed on ethics as it relates to leadership and common ethics traps. For more information and to register, click here.

    May 11, 6:00 pm – Attend Ales and Wild Tails at The Ale and Witch in St. Petersburg. Florida’s global importance as a nesting site for sea turtles will be discussed.  This is the first of a new speaker series hosted by the Center for Biological Diversity. For more information, click here or here.

    May 14, 9:00 am – Participate in Troy Springs Float Cleanup Down to Little River. You will need to have your own boat (canoes and power boats are both useful). Bring food and water, and let Fritzi Olson know if you can attend by May 12th. You can contact her at aar@currentproblems.org.

    May 14, 10:00 am – Attend the Trail Walk for Awareness to Save Gemini Springs Conservation Land at Gemini Springs Park in DeBary. The City of DeBary has planned to acquire conservation land between Gemini Springs and Lake Monroe with the goal of developing a master stormwater system, multifamily and single family housing, commercial and lodging. This land was acquired as mitigation for environmental damage during Interstate 4 construction. For more information, click here.

    May 14, 2:00 pm – Attend “Long Leaf Pine- Restoring Fred George Basin’s ecosystem,” a presentation by Tom Ostertag (FWC Imperiled Species Biologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    May 17, 12:00 pm – Attend Tri-County Working Group of Sierra Club’s meeting at the Crystal River Preserve State Park meeting room in Crystal River to discuss conservation issues of importance to Citrus, Levy, and Marion County residents. Following the meeting, the Education Committee will discuss progress on their new PPT presentation on solar energy for Florida. For more information, contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

    May 21, 11:00 am – Start or participate in a Hands Across the Sand event near you to Say No to Dirty Fuels and Yes to Clean Energy! For more information, click here.

    June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

    June 7, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs chemistry: General, nutrients, and trace contaminants. For more information, click here.

    June 18, 2:00 pm – Attend “Karst Environments in Florida and Geology of Fred George Basin,” a presentation by Harley Means (FLGS Geologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    June 25, 2:00 pm – Attend “The Beautiful Life of a Dead Tree: The Most Important Tree in the Woods,” a presentation by Jim Stevenson (Florida Springs Expert), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

    We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

    Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

    Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

    If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

    Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com

    About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

    For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - May 9, 2016

Posted by Gladys Delgadillo, Monday, May 9th, 2016 @ 10:54am

  • FCC News Brief

    Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

    May 9, 2016

     

    Susan Salisbury reports for the Palm Beach Post – “Florida Power & Light Co. customers will ultimately shell out an estimated $50 million this year alone for the cleanup of hypersaline water coming from the company’s Turkey Point nuclear plant…Barry White, president of Citizens Allied for Safe Energy, Miami, said the source of the problems in the cooling canal system have yet to be defined…. ‘Spending $50 million of anyone’s money to correct an undefined problem is ludicrous and should not be allowed.’ Richard Silvestri of Fort Pierce questioned why FPL customers would have to pay to fix Turkey Point’s problems. ‘Why not the stockholders? Where are these rules about who pays? After all, then the management at FPL can be totally incompetent with no accountability- not even for financial mistakes? It would seem the customers would have recourse in the courts to hold the management responsible personally,’ Silvestri said.” Read FPL customers to pay an estimated $50 million for Turkey Point fix

    Lucas Daprile reports for the TC Palm – “St. Lucie nuclear power plant operations have sucked more than 4,100 protected sea turtles from the ocean – more than one a day, on average- in the near decade it’s taken the federal government to approve a pipe grate…Still, the grate will not block an estimated 77 percent of turtles that get sucked in each year…What’s more, new government rules…allow the plant to suck in 143 more turtles a year than the previous cap of 1,000…The majority of turtles suffer minor injuries from the…trip through the barnacle-lined pipes…Inwater [monitors] the canal eight hours a day, every day…[T]he situation…gives Inwater the opportunity to assess turtles’ health and send sick ones to a medical facility… ‘We get them earlier in the disease process,’ said Charlie Manire, a veterinarian at [Loggerhead Marine Life Center]. ‘So in reality, I think we save more of them that come through the power plant than the ones that…show up on the beach.’” Read FPL kills endangered sea turtles while red tape delays pipe grate

    Jim Turner reports for The News Service of Florida – “The Volusia County Council…unanimously approved a “symbolic” resolution urging the commission to reinstate a prohibition on hunting Florida black bears. Council member Josh Wagner, who has purchased lifetime hunting licenses for himself and his two children, said the hunt goes against efforts and money spent to establish bear corridors and bear-management education programs…If the commission doesn’t want to reenact the ban, Kelli McGee, Volusia County’s director of growth and resource management, said the resolution also asks that the hunt not be held in the bear-management area that includes Volusia County…Volusia County is part of the Central bear management region, which includes the St. Johns River watershed and the Ocala National Forest… ‘This is just as much an issue of justice and democracy as it is of environmental stewardship,’ said Lewis. ‘Poll after poll showed that the majority of Floridians, 75 percent, were opposed to this hunt.’” Read County officials oppose another bear hunt

    Ray Russo and Elizabeth Screaton write for The Conversation – “The recent local bans (on fracking) include many regions with no confirmed oil or gas reserves…The locations of basement faults in Florida are poorly known, and although none have been known to generate earthquakes, their ultimate impact on seismicity in the state will depend on knowing their proximity to proposed locations of wastewater injection… Florida’s geology is significantly different from Oklahoma, where there has been the most seismic activity…Florida’s karst geology contains sinkholes, as well as extensive cave systems, which allow rapid entry and dispersive flow of contaminants into the aquifer system…Contaminants could reach irrigation and drinking water systems rapidly enough to pose economic and health risks before any effective warnings could be issued.” Read Should Florida ‘frack’ its limestone for oil and gas? Two geophysicists weigh in

    John Vidal reports for The Guardian – “Climate change is spawning injustice, racism, intolerance and wars, according to author and political activist Naomi Klein… ‘Fossil fuels, which are the principal driver of climate change, require the sacrifice of whole regions and people. Sacrificial zones like the Niger delta and the tar sands in Alberta, Canada, dot the world. These zones require the shredding of treaties that enable peoples to live on their land. Indigenous rights are meaningless when the land is being [destroyed] and the rivers are polluted. Resource extraction is a form of violence because it does so much damage and kills cultures,’ she said… ‘There is no clean, safe way to run an economy built on fossil fuels. There is no peaceful way to do it…If nations and people are regarded as other, it’s easier to wage wars and stage coups,’ she said… ‘[Climate change] is a present emergency. The Paris agreement…commits to keeping warming to below 2C. But this is reckless…African nations said this was a death sentence…’” Read Climate change is corroding our values, says Naomi Klein

    Oliver Milman reports for The Guardian– “Florida’s coral reefs are disintegrating far more quickly than previously thought, with warming, acidifying oceans causing a ‘wasting away’ of the coral structures that support an abundance of marine life…Scientists had previously thought that Florida’s reef, the only barrier reef in the continental US, wouldn’t start to break up until around 2050. But recent analysis shows that this process is already under way…[T]he upper Florida Keys are in significant decline...[E]xcess carbon dioxide has…caused the oceans to become more than 30% more acidic over the past century. This hinders the ability of corals to form their limestone structures, as well shellfish and mollusks to form their shells. Fish behavior has also been altered by the saturation of CO2…Florida’s reef…is one of the most important reef systems in the world. It faces a number of pressures…with dredging of the seabed for port expansion…The loss of coral reefs would have devastating consequences throughout the aquatic food chain…” Read Florida’s coral reefs rapidly ‘wasting away’ under stress of climate change

    University of California, San Diego shares – “Framing the issue of climate change collectively is more effective than emphasis on personal responsibility, finds a new study. People are willing to donate up to 50 percent more cash to the cause when thinking in collective terms. Thinking about climate change from a personal perspective produced little to no change in behavior.” Read How to talk about climate change so people will act

    Mitch Perry reports for Florida Politics – “Frustrated by the lack of urgency among Florida lawmakers when it comes to climate change and the increase of sea-level rise, South Miami Mayor Philip Stoddard says he’d like to create a 60-foot-tall “Tower of Shame” listing those who have failed to act on the issue…Mayor Stoddard said Florida lawmakers need to start making hard choices now to address what’s going to happen to coastal areas in Florida over the next 30 years.” Read South Miami Mayor Wants to Build ‘Tower of Shame’ for Those Failing to Act on Climate Change

     

     

    From Our Readers

    The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

     



    Job Postings

    The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


    Petitions

    Save the Econlockhatchee River!

    Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

    Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

    Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

    Paynes Prairie in danger

    Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

    Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

     

    Making Connections

    Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

     

    Upcoming Environmental Events

    May 11, 12:00 pm – Listen to “Ethics in Leadership Development for the Planner,” a 1000 Friends of Florida webinar covering the ethics requirements of the American Institute of Certified planners and how these interface with Florida’s ethics laws. Emphasis will be placed on ethics as it relates to leadership and common ethics traps. For more information and to register, click here.

    May 11, 6:00 pm – Attend Conservation Conversations and Beer: Florida’s Global Importance as a Nesting Site for Sea Turtles at The Ale and the Witch in St. Petersburg. This is the first of a new speaker series hosted by the Center for Biological Diversity. For more information, click here or here.

    May 14, 9:00 am – Participate in Troy Springs Float Cleanup Down to Little River. You will need to have your own boat (canoes and power boats are both useful). Bring food and water, and let Fritzi Olson know if you can attend by May 12th. You can contact her at aar@currentproblems.org.

    May 14, 2:00 pm – Attend “Long Leaf Pine- Restoring Fred George Basin’s ecosystem,” a presentation by Tom Ostertag (FWC Imperiled Species Biologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    May 17, 12:00 pm – Attend Tri-County Working Group of Sierra Club’s meeting at the Crystal River Preserve State Park meeting room in Crystal River to discuss conservation issues of importance to Citrus, Levy, and Marion County residents. Following the meeting, the Education Committee will discuss progress on their new PPT presentation on solar energy for Florida. For more information, contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

    May 21, 11:00 am – Start or participate in a Hands Across the Sand event near you to Say No to Dirty Fuels and Yes to Clean Energy! For more information, click here.

    June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

    June 7, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs chemistry: General, nutrients, and trace contaminants. For more information, click here.

    June 18, 2:00 pm – Attend “Karst Environments in Florida and Geology of Fred George Basin,” a presentation by Harley Means (FLGS Geologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    June 25, 2:00 pm – Attend “The Beautiful Life of a Dead Tree: The Most Important Tree in the Woods,” a presentation by Jim Stevenson (Florida Springs Expert), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

    We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

    Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

    Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

    If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

    Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com

    About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

    For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - May 7, 2016

Posted by Gladys Delgadillo, Monday, May 9th, 2016 @ 10:54am

  • FCC News Brief

    Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

    May 7, 2016

     

    Patricia Mazzei reports for the Miami Herald – “Coral Gables has taken several steps to become a sustainable city in the past year by encouraging and mandating green building standards, easing the process to obtain solar panels, and taking steps to ban the use of polystyrene products in the city…[T]he Florida Legislature passed a bill in February preventing local municipalities from banning the use of Styrofoam…products. Cities that approved their bans before Jan. 1 were allowed to keep their laws in place, but others-like Coral Gables- were forced to reverse their decisions. The Gables commission has since taken steps to keep the city ban including approving an ordinance that makes their ban effective as of December 2015…and backing up their decision to keep the ban by citing the Miami-Dade home rule charter.” Read Florida Legislature: Cities can’t ban Styrofoam. Coral Gables: Yes, we can

    Evan Williams reports for Fort Myers Florida Weekly – “More panthers were killed in April than ever before in a single month…[A]ll but two killed along Southwest Florida highways and roads. There is no record of the panthers ever attacking a person… ‘I think it’s fair to say that most private land in Florida is under some level of development threat,’ said David Shindle, Florida panther coordinator for the USFWS and a biologist who has worked with panthers since 1998…Ms. Hecker with the Conservancy (of Southwest Florida) said, ‘The biggest concern I have is that regulatory protections would be relaxed in an effort to gain support of…large landowners. And certainly while we want to gain their support we can’t do it at the expense of upholding the Endangered Species Act and all the protections it provides for the species.’” Read Officials consider less-ambitious Florida panther recovery goals

    Dinah Voyles Pulver reports for The Daytona Beach News-Journal – “A growing wave of opposition faces the city of DeBary’s plan to use…publicly owned conservation land near Gemini Springs for development around the SunRail station…Scott walks the Volusia County multi-use trail that runs through the conservation land ‘at least every other day’ and opposes any development plans. ‘This is important to me,’ she said. ‘What keeps me and other people in DeBary is the green space, the parks, the nature, the river. It’s our natural resources.’…[T]he St. Johns Riverkeeper and the Seminole Audubon Society…have issued statements opposing the plan…Lasley Blackner, a South Florida attorney who often represents groups that oppose sprawl, said the city’s plan may violate state laws that bar officials from predetermining land use before public hearings. If that’s what’s happening… ‘then it’s just void because it’s good old boys cutting deals in the back room.’” Read Outcry over DeBary land plan grows

    James Call reports for the Tallahassee Democrat – “Lake Jackson could pump an additional $26 million annually into Tallahassee’s economy if only someone would clean it up…A citizens group, Friends of Lake Jackson, wants state and local policymakers to convene a task force to restore the…lake to what it once was. Through the 1980s, Lake Jackson was a nationally recognized bass trophy fishing spot. As recently as 20 years ago, it attracted water skiers from across the Southeast…The state of Florida has recognized it as an Outstanding Florida Water Body and is the only lake designated a Florida Aquatic Preserve… ‘I’ll take on the leadership role in establishing a task force,’ said (Senator) Montford (D-Tallahassee)…More than two dozen government entities share some responsibility for managing the lake. Advocates say that prevents any one agency from developing and implementing a coordinated, holistic approach… ‘We are in full support of the Task Force…,’ said Dee Ann Miller, DEP’s deputy press secretary. ‘We are happy to offer technical assistance to support this effort.’” Read Wanted, a force to restore Lake Jackson

    Kyle Arnold reports for the Orlando Sentinel – “More than 115,000 people have signed an online petition asking Publix to stop selling eggs from chickens raised in cages…Olive Garden, Costco, Winn-Dixie and Wal-Mart have all agreed to go cage-free over the next decade, giving their suppliers enough time to make changes. Publix is the only major retailer left that hasn’t agreed to a timeline…” Read Cage-free egg activists target Publix

    Dinah Voyles Pulver reports for The Daytona Beach News-Journal – “After experiencing the most nuisance bear calls in Florida last year, Volusia County will consider opposing the state’s controversial black bear hunt…At its June meeting, the wildlife commission is scheduled to consider a repeat of its hunt…Regarding counties taking action to ban or oppose the hunt, wildlife commission officials say they would rather see counties take action to reduce human bear conflicts… ‘Tammy Sapp, spokeswoman for the commission’s division of hunting and game management, said ‘…[W]e appreciate Seminole County’s leadership in establishing a proactive local ordinance regarding waste management in communities experiencing high levels of human-bear conflicts.’” Read Volusia looks to take (symbolic) stand against bear hunt

    The News Service of Florida reports – “Gov. Rick Scott and the Florida Cabinet will be asked Tuesday to consider a pair of land deals that would cost the state about $6.6 million, keep nearly 3,800 acres in Osceola County from new development and allow ranch operations to continue on the properties. Money for both deals…would come from the state’s Rural and Family Lands Protection Program.” Read Scott, Cabinet eye Osceola land deals

    Tallahassee Democrat Editorial Board writes – “This is the Sunshine State and solar energy is a big deal. Installing solar panels on a rooftop is expensive…and they add to the value of the properties using them…There is utterly no prospect of the Legislature appropriating money to subsidize solar systems, so a tax exemption is the next best thing…The idea is to provide tax relief for large-scale solar farms or commercial installations. Big box retailers like CostCo and Wal-Mart, even smaller strip malls, could lease their rooftops for solar systems, without hiking their property taxes.” Read Yes on Amendment 4 – in August

     

     

    From Our Readers

    The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

     



    Job Postings

    The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


    Petitions

    Save the Econlockhatchee River!

    Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

    Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

    Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

    Paynes Prairie in danger

    Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

    Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

     

    Making Connections

    Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

     

    Upcoming Environmental Events

    May 11, 12:00 pm – Listen to “Ethics in Leadership Development for the Planner,” a 1000 Friends of Florida webinar covering the ethics requirements of the American Institute of Certified planners and how these interface with Florida’s ethics laws. Emphasis will be placed on ethics as it relates to leadership and common ethics traps. For more information and to register, click here.

    May 11, 6:00 pm – Attend Conservation Conversations and Beer: Florida’s Global Importance as a Nesting Site for Sea Turtles at The Ale and the Witch in St. Petersburg. This is the first of a new speaker series hosted by the Center for Biological Diversity. For more information, click here or here.

    May 14, 9:00 am – Participate in Troy Springs Float Cleanup Down to Little River. You will need to have your own boat (canoes and power boats are both useful). Bring food and water, and let Fritzi Olson know if you can attend by May 12th. You can contact her at aar@currentproblems.org.

    May 14, 2:00 pm – Attend “Long Leaf Pine- Restoring Fred George Basin’s ecosystem,” a presentation by Tom Ostertag (FWC Imperiled Species Biologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    May 17, 12:00 pm – Attend Tri-County Working Group of Sierra Club’s meeting at the Crystal River Preserve State Park meeting room in Crystal River to discuss conservation issues of importance to Citrus, Levy, and Marion County residents. Following the meeting, the Education Committee will discuss progress on their new PPT presentation on solar energy for Florida. For more information, contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

    May 21, 11:00 am – Start or participate in a Hands Across the Sand event near you to Say No to Dirty Fuels and Yes to Clean Energy! For more information, click here.

    June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

    June 7, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs chemistry: General, nutrients, and trace contaminants. For more information, click here.

    June 18, 2:00 pm – Attend “Karst Environments in Florida and Geology of Fred George Basin,” a presentation by Harley Means (FLGS Geologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    June 25, 2:00 pm – Attend “The Beautiful Life of a Dead Tree: The Most Important Tree in the Woods,” a presentation by Jim Stevenson (Florida Springs Expert), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

    We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

    Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

    Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

    If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

    Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com

    About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

    For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - May 7, 2016

E-mail sent by Matt Gaetz, Saturday, May 7th, 2016 @ 9:08am

FCC News Brief

Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

May 7, 2016

 

Patricia Mazzei reports for the Miami Herald – “Coral Gables has taken several steps to become a sustainable city in the past year by encouraging and mandating green building standards, easing the process to obtain solar panels, and taking steps to ban the use of polystyrene products in the city…[T]he Florida Legislature passed a bill in February preventing local municipalities from banning the use of Styrofoam…products. Cities that approved their bans before Jan. 1 were allowed to keep their laws in place, but others-like Coral Gables- were forced to reverse their decisions. The Gables commission has since taken steps to keep the city ban including approving an ordinance that makes their ban effective as of December 2015…and backing up their decision to keep the ban by citing the Miami-Dade home rule charter.” Read Florida Legislature: Cities can’t ban Styrofoam. Coral Gables: Yes, we can

Evan Williams reports for Fort Myers Florida Weekly – “More panthers were killed in April than ever before in a single month…[A]ll but two killed along Southwest Florida highways and roads. There is no record of the panthers ever attacking a person… ‘I think it’s fair to say that most private land in Florida is under some level of development threat,’ said David Shindle, Florida panther coordinator for the USFWS and a biologist who has worked with panthers since 1998…Ms. Hecker with the Conservancy (of Southwest Florida) said, ‘The biggest concern I have is that regulatory protections would be relaxed in an effort to gain support of…large landowners. And certainly while we want to gain their support we can’t do it at the expense of upholding the Endangered Species Act and all the protections it provides for the species.’” Read Officials consider less-ambitious Florida panther recovery goals

Dinah Voyles Pulver reports for The Daytona Beach News-Journal – “A growing wave of opposition faces the city of DeBary’s plan to use…publicly owned conservation land near Gemini Springs for development around the SunRail station…Scott walks the Volusia County multi-use trail that runs through the conservation land ‘at least every other day’ and opposes any development plans. ‘This is important to me,’ she said. ‘What keeps me and other people in DeBary is the green space, the parks, the nature, the river. It’s our natural resources.’…[T]he St. Johns Riverkeeper and the Seminole Audubon Society…have issued statements opposing the plan…Lasley Blackner, a South Florida attorney who often represents groups that oppose sprawl, said the city’s plan may violate state laws that bar officials from predetermining land use before public hearings. If that’s what’s happening… ‘then it’s just void because it’s good old boys cutting deals in the back room.’” Read Outcry over DeBary land plan grows

James Call reports for the Tallahassee Democrat – “Lake Jackson could pump an additional $26 million annually into Tallahassee’s economy if only someone would clean it up…A citizens group, Friends of Lake Jackson, wants state and local policymakers to convene a task force to restore the…lake to what it once was. Through the 1980s, Lake Jackson was a nationally recognized bass trophy fishing spot. As recently as 20 years ago, it attracted water skiers from across the Southeast…The state of Florida has recognized it as an Outstanding Florida Water Body and is the only lake designated a Florida Aquatic Preserve… ‘I’ll take on the leadership role in establishing a task force,’ said (Senator) Montford (D-Tallahassee)…More than two dozen government entities share some responsibility for managing the lake. Advocates say that prevents any one agency from developing and implementing a coordinated, holistic approach… ‘We are in full support of the Task Force…,’ said Dee Ann Miller, DEP’s deputy press secretary. ‘We are happy to offer technical assistance to support this effort.’” Read Wanted, a force to restore Lake Jackson

Kyle Arnold reports for the Orlando Sentinel – “More than 115,000 people have signed an online petition asking Publix to stop selling eggs from chickens raised in cages…Olive Garden, Costco, Winn-Dixie and Wal-Mart have all agreed to go cage-free over the next decade, giving their suppliers enough time to make changes. Publix is the only major retailer left that hasn’t agreed to a timeline…” Read Cage-free egg activists target Publix

Dinah Voyles Pulver reports for The Daytona Beach News-Journal – “After experiencing the most nuisance bear calls in Florida last year, Volusia County will consider opposing the state’s controversial black bear hunt…At its June meeting, the wildlife commission is scheduled to consider a repeat of its hunt…Regarding counties taking action to ban or oppose the hunt, wildlife commission officials say they would rather see counties take action to reduce human bear conflicts… ‘Tammy Sapp, spokeswoman for the commission’s division of hunting and game management, said ‘…[W]e appreciate Seminole County’s leadership in establishing a proactive local ordinance regarding waste management in communities experiencing high levels of human-bear conflicts.’” Read Volusia looks to take (symbolic) stand against bear hunt

The News Service of Florida reports – “Gov. Rick Scott and the Florida Cabinet will be asked Tuesday to consider a pair of land deals that would cost the state about $6.6 million, keep nearly 3,800 acres in Osceola County from new development and allow ranch operations to continue on the properties. Money for both deals…would come from the state’s Rural and Family Lands Protection Program.” Read Scott, Cabinet eye Osceola land deals

Tallahassee Democrat Editorial Board writes – “This is the Sunshine State and solar energy is a big deal. Installing solar panels on a rooftop is expensive…and they add to the value of the properties using them…There is utterly no prospect of the Legislature appropriating money to subsidize solar systems, so a tax exemption is the next best thing…The idea is to provide tax relief for large-scale solar farms or commercial installations. Big box retailers like CostCo and Wal-Mart, even smaller strip malls, could lease their rooftops for solar systems, without hiking their property taxes.” Read Yes on Amendment 4 – in August

 

 

From Our Readers

The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

 



Job Postings

The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


Petitions

Save the Econlockhatchee River!

Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

Paynes Prairie in danger

Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

 

Making Connections

Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

 

Upcoming Environmental Events

May 11, 12:00 pm – Listen to “Ethics in Leadership Development for the Planner,” a 1000 Friends of Florida webinar covering the ethics requirements of the American Institute of Certified planners and how these interface with Florida’s ethics laws. Emphasis will be placed on ethics as it relates to leadership and common ethics traps. For more information and to register, click here.

May 11, 6:00 pm – Attend Conservation Conversations and Beer: Florida’s Global Importance as a Nesting Site for Sea Turtles at The Ale and the Witch in St. Petersburg. This is the first of a new speaker series hosted by the Center for Biological Diversity. For more information, click here or here.

May 14, 9:00 am – Participate in Troy Springs Float Cleanup Down to Little River. You will need to have your own boat (canoes and power boats are both useful). Bring food and water, and let Fritzi Olson know if you can attend by May 12th. You can contact her at aar@currentproblems.org.

May 14, 2:00 pm – Attend “Long Leaf Pine- Restoring Fred George Basin’s ecosystem,” a presentation by Tom Ostertag (FWC Imperiled Species Biologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

May 17, 12:00 pm – Attend Tri-County Working Group of Sierra Club’s meeting at the Crystal River Preserve State Park meeting room in Crystal River to discuss conservation issues of importance to Citrus, Levy, and Marion County residents. Following the meeting, the Education Committee will discuss progress on their new PPT presentation on solar energy for Florida. For more information, contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

May 21, 11:00 am – Start or participate in a Hands Across the Sand event near you to Say No to Dirty Fuels and Yes to Clean Energy! For more information, click here.

June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

June 7, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs chemistry: General, nutrients, and trace contaminants. For more information, click here.

June 18, 2:00 pm – Attend “Karst Environments in Florida and Geology of Fred George Basin,” a presentation by Harley Means (FLGS Geologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

June 25, 2:00 pm – Attend “The Beautiful Life of a Dead Tree: The Most Important Tree in the Woods,” a presentation by Jim Stevenson (Florida Springs Expert), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com

About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - May 6, 2016

Posted by Gladys Delgadillo, Friday, May 6th, 2016 @ 8:48am

  • FCC News Brief

    Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

    May 6, 2016

     

    Craig Pittman reports for the Tampa Bay Times – “Computer models that Florida officials use to issue water use and pollution permits are flawed and need scientific review, an environmental coalition said in a challenge filed with the state last week. The Florida Springs Council…tried to get its concerns… incorporated into a bill considered by the Legislature this year, but its suggestions were rejected…[O]ne water district in the Panhandle ‘claimed that it uses no models at all in its water-related regulatory determinations.’ The other four water districts said they used computer models that had not been subjected to any scientific peer review…The Tampa Bay Times reported in 2013 that a computer model that state water agencies routinely use…is based on the assumption that what’s underground is just sand and gravel. However, most of the state’s geology is…’karst’…[and] allows water to flow through it much more quickly than it does through sand or gravel…[M]odel tweaking by the Southwest Florida Water Management District Staff did not foresee what happened in Plant City in 2010. Farmers trying to protect their crops during a freeze pumped so much water out of the ground that the aquifer dropped 60 feet in just days. As a result, 140 sinkholes opened up throughout the region.” Read Springs group challenges Florida’s computer model for permitting

    Becky Oskin reports for Seeker – “Rising sea levels are transforming the Florida Everglades, a new study shows. Plant communities that thrive in salt water are expanding along the coast, leaving less room for plants that depend on fresh water…Changes in water management, such as the implementation of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, may help offset the potential effects of saltwater intrusion, the researchers said.” Read Rising sea levels are transforming the Florida Everglades

    The Daytona Beach News-Journal Editorial Board writes – “How can someone serve on the water district board while running a company that profits from business before the agency- while at the same time negotiating to transfer land from the district? Such land deals should be judged with unconflicted eyes…Roger Van Auker, DeBary’s marketing director for transit-oriented development, sent an email to Bio-Tech official Jay Baker asking, ‘Also, did you confirm once again with John Miklos regarding the use of the land…to be used for both public storm water…and some private development the fact that there will be no restrictions from SJRWMD?’ Baker responded: ‘…[John’s]…idea is currently to transfer ownership of the entire Gemini Springs property over to the City of DeBary.’ That makes it sound like it’s a done deal.” Read DeBary land plan demands answers

    Dinah Voyles Pulver reports for The Daytona Beach News-Journal – “A proposed land deal to allow the city of DeBary to acquire publicly owned conservation land for a private development has enflamed a long-simmering issue…the role of-and influence wielded by- John Miklos… ‘It’s not about the things coming to the board,’ said Lisa Rinaman, the St. Johns Riverkeeper. ‘It’s that power he wields over the board and the process.’ ‘This is a climate where (the district) is firing people left and right,’ she said. [A] former board member, Richard Hamann, an associate in law at the University of Florida’s Center for Governmental Responsibility, said Miklos is correct that as long as he doesn’t vote on the DeBary item, it wouldn’t’ be a direct conflict under state ethics law… ‘but he may not be able to do it under federal law.’…The federal law that might apply is the “Honest Services Act,”…which prohibits public officials from using their government position for private benefit.” Read Board chairman’s influence in Gemini Springs land deal raises red flags in DeBary

    Ben Brasch reports for News-Press – “Wildlife officials…found in Collier County the 18th Florida panther struck and killed by a vehicle this year…This was the 21st panther death in 2016…Florida panthers are one of the most endangered mammals on the planet. Scientists estimate there are between 100 and 180 of the cats living mostly south of Lake Okeechobee.” Read Vehicle in Collier County kills 21st panther of 2016

    Ran Benk reports for WJCT – “The city of Jacksonville has made a $30 million deal with JEA to speed up the phase-out of septic tanks. Environmentalists are cheering the…plan…Jacksonville aims to get rid of septic tanks in its most vulnerable areas over five years. The plan will take off this October.” Read Jacksonville to Phase Out Septic Tanks in Environmentally Sensitive Areas

    The Orlando Sentinel Editorial Board writes – “Even with federal protections, manatees are being killed in large numbers, much of it attributable to human action or inaction. An average of 472 manatee deaths have been recorded each year for the past decade…In the winter, manatees need warm water to survive, and they seek it in Florida’s natural springs and outflow canals at power plants. Yet our springs are increasingly polluted and overcrowded, and outdated power plants on coastal waters are being shut down. The loss of just one plat would put hundreds of manatees at risk…Even with speed limits in place, boats killed 10 manatees in Brevard waters last year…Given the unrelenting pressure to develop coastal Florida, the next time manatees face extinction it could be too late to save them. And extinction is forever.” Read Don’t lessen manatee protections

    Selina Iglesias reports for Greene Publishing, Inc. – “Commissioner Alfred Martin motioned to enact the ordinance banning fracking (in Madison County), seconded by Commissioner Wayne Vickers. The enactment of the ordinance was approved, 5-0.” Read  County commissioners vote to ban fracking

     

     

    From Our Readers

    The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

     



    Job Postings

    The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


    Petitions

    Save the Econlockhatchee River!

    Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

    Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

    Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

    Paynes Prairie in danger

    Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

    Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

     

    Making Connections

    Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

     

    Upcoming Environmental Events

    May 11, 12:00 pm – Listen to “Ethics in Leadership Development for the Planner,” a 1000 Friends of Florida webinar covering the ethics requirements of the American Institute of Certified planners and how these interface with Florida’s ethics laws. Emphasis will be placed on ethics as it relates to leadership and common ethics traps. For more information and to register, click here.

    May 11, 6:00 pm – Attend Conservation Conversations and Beer: Florida’s Global Importance as a Nesting Site for Sea Turtles at The Ale and the Witch in St. Petersburg. This is the first of a new speaker series hosted by the Center for Biological Diversity. For more information, click here or here.

    May 14, 9:00 am – Participate in Troy Springs Float Cleanup Down to Little River. You will need to have your own boat (canoes and power boats are both useful). Bring food and water, and let Fritzi Olson know if you can attend by May 12th. You can contact her at aar@currentproblems.org.

    May 14, 2:00 pm – Attend “Long Leaf Pine- Restoring Fred George Basin’s ecosystem,” a presentation by Tom Ostertag (FWC Imperiled Species Biologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    May 17, 12:00 pm – Attend Tri-County Working Group of Sierra Club’s meeting at the Crystal River Preserve State Park meeting room in Crystal River to discuss conservation issues of importance to Citrus, Levy, and Marion County residents. Following the meeting, the Education Committee will discuss progress on their new PPT presentation on solar energy for Florida. For more information, contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

    May 21, 11:00 am – Start or participate in a Hands Across the Sand event near you to Say No to Dirty Fuels and Yes to Clean Energy! For more information, click here.

    June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

    June 7, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs chemistry: General, nutrients, and trace contaminants. For more information, click here.

    June 18, 2:00 pm – Attend “Karst Environments in Florida and Geology of Fred George Basin,” a presentation by Harley Means (FLGS Geologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    June 25, 2:00 pm – Attend “The Beautiful Life of a Dead Tree: The Most Important Tree in the Woods,” a presentation by Jim Stevenson (Florida Springs Expert), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

    We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

    Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

    Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

    If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

    Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com

    About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

    For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - May 5, 2016

Posted by Gladys Delgadillo, Thursday, May 5th, 2016 @ 10:54am

  • FCC News Brief

    Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

    May 5, 2016

     

    Mark Buchanan writes for the Ames Tribune – “People tend to fear spiders and snakes more than they do electrical sockets or fireworks, even though the latter present a far greater danger. This might help explain why humans have such a hard time seeing the threat of climate change. Evolutionary psychologists argue that much of human behavior can be understood only by studying our ancient ancestors. Through 99 percent of human history, they lived in small groups of hunter-gatherers, with brains evolved to handle specific tasks, such as recognizing quickly a poisonous reptile or the emotions and intentions betrayed by facial expressions. The kind of rational thinking needed to weigh payoffs far in the future developed only recently, in the last 1 percent of our existence…A threat that emerges only gradually, with consequences coming only in the future, just doesn’t excite our ancient mental circuits with the urgency of a scuttling spider or terrorists on the television. It resides in a mental blind spot…Studies show that appeals to self-interest (saving money) don’t work nearly as well as social norms in encouraging people to use less energy…Defaults don’t just take advantage of human laziness…Rather, they assert a societal value and encourage people to follow it.” Read Why we fear spiders more than climate change

    James Conca writes for Forbes – “[A]nother group of children who are suing the government to protect the environment against the harm of global warming in their future, have won in court…King County Superior Court Judge Hollis Hill re-ordered the Department of Ecology to promulgate a carbon emissions reduction rule by the end of 2016 and make recommendations to the state legislature on science-based greenhouse gas reduction in the 2017 legislative session…The lawsuit brought by the youths alleges that the Federal Government is violating the Plaintiffs’ constitutional and public trust rights by promoting the use of fossil fuels. The basis for these lawsuits is that, for over fifty years, the United States Government and the Fossil Fuel Industry have known that carbon dioxide from burning fossil fuels causes global warming and dangerous climate change, and that continuing to burn fossil fuels destabilizes the climate system. This case is one of several similar cases in federal district court in Oregon, and in the state courts of North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Colorado, and Massachusetts, all supported by Our Children’s Trust…[The] lawsuits claim that a government elected by the people and for the people has a duty to protect the natural systems required for the people’s survival….[I]f both the executive and legislative branches fail in that duty, then the judicial branch must intervene.” Read Kids Win Again in Lawsuit Blaming Gov’t for Not Fighting Global Warming

    Jose Hernan Sarasola reports for The Conversation – “[R]ecent research shows, for the first time, that large cats can affect the plant life in their environments by means other than eating herbivores. They do this by dispersing seeds in their scat. This is an overlooked ecological function for large cats. It is also a crucial function for the maintenance and preservation of plant populations in every terrestrial ecosystem…Wild felids face a variety of threats that have led to the decline of their populations and contraction of their geographic range. Unless they are protected, our study suggests that other important – and perhaps still unknown – ecological functions of large feline species may disappear along with their populations.” Read Big cats play a bigger role in plant preservation than we knew before

    Jason Pelszynski writes for The Tampa Tribune – “Regarding the proposed plan to develop tens of thousands of acres in eastern Collier County, I strongly disagree with continuing the practice of destruction in these ecologically sensitive areas of Florida. There simply isn’t enough of it left to support the wildlife that depends on it for their survival…Why place 10 federally listed species and six additional state-listed and unlisted species at such risk for further population loss while their numbers are already so few? Why have they been placed under any protection at all if we are just going to turn around and make exemptions to the law when they’re deemed an inconvenience?” Read Stop the destruction of Florida and its wildlife

    Lizette Alvarez reports for The New York Times – “The large-scale dredging of Miami’s port…caused widespread damage to…the area’s fragile and already distressed coral reef, according to a new report by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The report…found that as much as 81 percent of the reef near the dredging site was buried in sediment, and an Army Corps of Engineers contractor report…shows up to 93 percent partial coral death because of sediment…The damage is particularly alarming because the world is rapidly losing its reefs, partly because of global warming…South Florida has the only coral reef in the continental United States and 80 to 90 percent of it has died or been badly harmed over the years…The agency’s survey of the extensive damage comes at a time when Fort Lauderdale is seeking final congressional approval for the dredging of…Port Everglades, one of the largest (ports) in the country… ‘The corps like to say they learned a lot of lessons, and they promise they won’t do this again in Port Everglades,’ Ms. Silverstein (executive director of Miami Waterkeeper) said. ‘We would like to see less aspirational talk and more mandatory language protecting these reefs.’” Read Dredging of Miami Port Badly Damaged Coral Reef, Study Finds

    Ray Judah writes for News-Press – “(Congressman) Rooney takes exception to the recent articles and editorials that have repeatedly characterized the water discharges from Lake O as ‘dirty’ and ‘polluted’ and cites a 2016 South Florida Environmental report as evidence of phosphorus reduction in agricultural runoff. The facts do not support Rooney’s position. In 2014, a federal district court judge ruled that back pumping from the EAA into Lake Okeechobee violated the Clean Water Act. The Florida Legislature response was to eviscerate state water policy during the 2016 legislative session and adopt a water bill that delays Lake Okeechobee clean up by eliminating a January 2015 deadline – which the state didn’t meet – for compliance with nutrient levels without creating a new deadline. More than 400 tons of phosphorus enter the lake each year and the state was supposed to reduce it to 105 tons. Furthermore, the water bill failed to establish deadlines for setting Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs)…The Congressman says to trust him…Unfortunately, his voting record…[requires] further public scrutiny to hold him accountable for his actions.” Read Congressman not fixin’ water woes

    J.P. Sasser writes for the Tallahassee Democrat – “It’s incredibly frustrating to read statements from people making judgments on circumstances about which they have no real knowledge or understanding…80 percent of the pollution (in Lake Okeechobee) is from local sources such as local run off, septic tanks and sewage effluent from communities north and west of Lake Okeechobee…Mr. Walton never mentions the 6 million people calling South Florida home. He never mentions that while agriculture in the EAA is required by law to meet…pollution limits – none of these 6 million people and developers that build their homes are held to any state pollution standards. In fact, the State of Florida repealed its statewide septic tank standards law in 2010. The counties were to step up to the plate. This never happened…[T[he EAA is the winter vegetable capital of the world.” Read Criticism of Florida’s sugar farmers frustrating

    Mollie Reilly reports for Huffpost Politics – “California Gov. Jerry Brown (D) hit back at criticism over his state’s minimum wage increase from Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R)…telling Scott to ‘stop the silly political stunts’ and instead focus on his state’s struggle with climate change.” Read Jerry Brown Welcomes Rick Scott to California with Climate Change Burn

     

     

    From Our Readers

    The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

     



    Job Postings

    The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


    Petitions

    Save the Econlockhatchee River!

    Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

    Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

    Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

    Paynes Prairie in danger

    Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

    Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

     

    Making Connections

    Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

     

    Upcoming Environmental Events

    May 11, 12:00 pm – Listen to “Ethics in Leadership Development for the Planner,” a 1000 Friends of Florida webinar covering the ethics requirements of the American Institute of Certified planners and how these interface with Florida’s ethics laws. Emphasis will be placed on ethics as it relates to leadership and common ethics traps. For more information and to register, click here.

    May 14, 2:00 pm – Attend “Long Leaf Pine- Restoring Fred George Basin’s ecosystem,” a presentation by Tom Ostertag (FWC Imperiled Species Biologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

    June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

    June 7, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs chemistry: General, nutrients, and trace contaminants. For more information, click here.

     

     

     

     

     

    Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

    We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

    Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

    Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

    If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

    Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com

    About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

    For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - May 4, 2016

Posted by Gladys Delgadillo, Wednesday, May 4th, 2016 @ 10:28am

  • FCC News Brief

    Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

    May 4, 2016

     

    Scott Maxwell writes for the Orlando Sentinel – “John Miklos is…the chairman of the St. Johns River Water Management District, the environmental agency that does everything from determine how much of Central Florida’s dwindling water supply companies can use to who can turn wetlands into housing developments in 18 counties in central and northeast Florida…Miklos…makes money - $155 an hour in one case- representing businesses and companies that need things from the district. Yes, Miklos owns a private business. And part of his business is offering clients the chance to pay him to help them get things from the very government agency he helps run. It’s a wicked conflict of interest- and why Miklos has no business serving on this board…Florida’s ethics laws are weaker than a virgin daiquiri. Technically, you can declare conflicts all day long as long as you don’t vote on things that directly benefit you or your clients. The biggest flaw is that you don’t even have to declare conflicts if you’re…working with district staffers on clients’’ behalf, as Miklos has. You can decide for yourself whether staffers would feel any pressure when fielding a request from the chairman of the board or his company.” Read Get conflicted consultant off water board

    Keith Morelli reports for The Tampa Tribune – “[S]tate wildlife officials seem poised to allow another limited (bear) hunt this fall, in spite of widespread public opposition and focused protests by environmentalists and animal rights advocates. Anti-hunting groups (including the Sierra Club in Florida) are gearing up to take the state to court or join other lawsuits, should…officials…approve a second hunt in October…[Frank Jackalone, senior field organizing manager with the Sierra Club in Florida] said ‘any reasonable judge’ would see that the state ‘botched’ the hunt last year that resulted in hundreds of bears being killed in two days. The Center for Biological Diversity…submitted friend-of-the-court documents in support of a lawsuit filed last year to halt the hunt. That suit is still pending and whether it will come into play this year remains unclear, said Jaclyn Lopez, Florida director of the Center…A lawsuit to stop the hunt was filed last year by Chuck O’Neal,…a candidate for the state Senate.” Read Anti-hunting groups plan court action to stop second Florida bear hunt

    Susan Salisbury reports for the Palm Beach Post – “Florida Power & Light Co.’s quest to receive a federal license to build two new nuclear reactors at its Turkey Point Power plant has experienced yet another delay, but the company wants to charge another $22 million in pre-licensing costs to customers in 2017…If the $22 million is added…, customers will have paid more than $303 million by the end of next year towards the reactors…The reactors have yet to be licensed and might never be built…On A-pril 21 the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Atomic Safety and Licensing Board issued an order requiring an evidentiary hearing. There’s a dispute over whether injecting wastewater into the ground could adversely impact groundwater in the Upper Floridan Aquifer.” Read FPL wants to collect another $22 million for two new nuclear reactors

    Greg Stanley reports for the Naples Daily News – “Everglades City’s failing sewage plant pumped inadequately treated liquid sewage – hundreds of thousands of gallons of it – into nearby mangroves in late March and early April, according to state inspectors…The city also needs to haul off wastewater from an overflowing percolation pond, which has been intermittently leaking into the same mangroves since April 7, inspectors said…DEP in March asked Collier County to consider taking over the plant or to help run it. But commissioners…decided against getting involved…The DEP has been trying to get Everglades City, which sits just outside the border of the national park, to replace its treatment plant for years. It sued the city in November, saying officials failed to make 12 of the 24 necessary repairs and replacements they agreed to make in a past lawsuit over the failing plant.” Read Everglades City pumping hundreds of thousands of gallons of poorly treated sewage into mangroves

    Tyler Treadway reports for the TC Palm – “Roth…[is] running for the U.S. House District 18 seat…Roth said environmentalists aren’t interested in cleaning water and preserving estuaries. Their agenda is ‘about pushing human activity out of the region. The environmental groups’ goals are anti-food, anti-water supply and anti-people,’ he [said]…Roth said environmental groups have become ‘a cottage industry that has to have an issue to fight on to continue to raise money. They’ve got a predetermined agenda to take away farmland. How can I work with people who want to destroy a way of life that employs people…and feeds a lot more people?’” Read Sugar farmer Rick Roth runs for Congress in Indian River Lagoon country

    WFSU News reports – “There are 27 candidates vying for a spot in the U.S. Senate. With an August 30th primary looming, there is still no clear frontrunner. Here’s a look at some of the big names in the race.” Read Take a Look at Florida’s Crowded U.S. Senate Race

    Isadora Rangel reports for the TC Palm – “U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio said…he doesn’t support buying land south of Lake Okeechobee ‘at this time’ to reduce discharges into the Indian River Lagoon, saying it’s not a ‘realistic proposal.’ The Republican said there’s no money to do that and the federal government should focus on finishing projects already in the pipeline…The Central Everglades Planning Project was included in a bill that authorizes water and marine infrastructure projects across the country…Rubio lobbied to get CEPP in that bill. He also mentioned the U.S. Small Business Administration now is offering low-interest loans to businesses affected by discharges.” Read Marco Rubio against buying land south of Lake Okeechobee to alleviate discharges

    SUN Day Campaign reports for EcoWatch – “[R]enewable sources (i.e., wind, solar, biomass and hydropower) outpaced…natural gas by a factor of more than 70:1 for new electrical generating capacity placed in-service during the first three months of calendar year 2016… ‘While often touted as being a ‘bridge fuel,’ natural gas is increasingly becoming an unnecessary bridge to nowhere,’ noted Ken Bossong, executive director of the SUN DAY Campaign.” Read New Report Shows ‘Natural Gas Increasingly Becoming an Unnecessary Bridge to Nowhere’

     

     

    From Our Readers

    The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

     



    Job Postings

    The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


    Petitions

    Save the Econlockhatchee River!

    Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

    Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

    Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

    Paynes Prairie in danger

    Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

    Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

     

    Making Connections

    Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

     

    Upcoming Environmental Events

    May 11, 12:00 pm – Listen to “Ethics in Leadership Development for the Planner,” a 1000 Friends of Florida webinar covering the ethics requirements of the American Institute of Certified planners and how these interface with Florida’s ethics laws. Emphasis will be placed on ethics as it relates to leadership and common ethics traps. For more information and to register, click here.

    May 14, 2:00 pm – Attend “Long Leaf Pine- Restoring Fred George Basin’s ecosystem,” a presentation by Tom Ostertag (FWC Imperiled Species Biologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

    June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

    June 7, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs chemistry: General, nutrients, and trace contaminants. For more information, click here.

     

     

     

     

     

    Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

    We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

    Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

    Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

    If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

    Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com

    About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

    For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - May 3, 2016

Posted by Gladys Delgadillo, Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016 @ 9:44am

  • FCC News Brief

    Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

    May 3, 2016

     

    Sierra Club Florida shares – “Sierra Club Florida submitted comments to the US Fish and Wildlife Service expressing strong opposition to the proposed Eastern Collier Habitat Conservation Plan…Our letter to the Service follows:… ‘There should be no land use intensification in the Primary Zone…Based on the known population density, the Primary Zone can support 71 to 84 panthers, which is barely within the minimum recommended base population of 80 to 100 necessary for persistence in south Florida. Therefore, the maintenance of existing home ranges and habitat conditions within the Primary Zone is essential to the survival of the Florida panther.” Read Sierra Club Opposes Plan to Develop 45,000 Acres of Panther Habitat

    Jenny Staletovich reports for the Miami Herald – “This April will go down as the bloodiest month yet for the Florida panther…[N]ine of the endangered cats have died, all but one killed along Southwest Florida highways and roads. Seven were males, almost all of them at the young age when they start looking to establish their own territory…20 panthers have died this year, a number on track to outpace last year’s record-breaking 41 fatalities…The number…speaks to the increasing pressure from development on the wide-ranging panthers, particularly males, which each need a territory of about 200 square miles… ‘It’s death by a thousand cuts where this is not sustainable in the long term in our view unless we modify where and how we develop,’ said Jennifer Hecker, director of natural resource policy for the Conservancy of Southwest Florida…[W]hile some highways can be fenced, building neighborhoods is another story. Golden Gate Estates, a 100,000-acre-plus neighborhood of mixed residential and rural development in prime panther territory, remain a problem, said Elizabeth Fleming, a senior Florida representative for Defenders of Wildlife. ‘It’s a shame that was built because it’s just sprawl and there is still green habitat in there, but it’s not a safe place for panthers to be moving around,’ she said.” Read Deadliest month ever for Florida panthers, with nine killed

    Chris Mooney reports for the Washington Post – “[S]ince mid-2015, a massive 40,000-acre (seagrass) die off…recalls a prior die-off from 1987 through the early 1990s…Fourqurean (a marine scientist at FIU) and government Everglades experts fear they’re witnessing a serious environmental breakdown, one that gravely threatens one of North America’s most fragile and unusual wild places…Besides being home to majestic sea turtles, dolphins, and manatees, Florida Bay also hosts pink shrimp, spiny lobsters, spotted seatrout, and much more- sport fishing alone here is worth $1.2 billion per year, according to the Everglades Foundation. And although there is at least some scientific dissent, Fourqurean and fellow scientists think they know the cause of the die-off. It’s just the latest manifestation, they say, of the core problem that has bedeviled this system for many decades: Construction of homes, roads, and cities has choked off the flow of fresh water. Without fast moves to make the park far more resilient to climate change and rising, salty seas, the problem will steadily worsen… ‘It’s basically a permanent manmade drought, created by the drainage and development patterns to the north in the Everglades,’ said Robert Johnson, director of the National Park Service’s South Florida Natural Resources Center…‘You have this water that’s…gin clear water, because the seagrasses and the biology kept the light penetrating, and then all of a sudden it changes pretty dramatically to a system without grass, and very turbid waters,’ Boesch said…‘The really disturbing thing is, this unprecedented event has now happened twice in my career,’ Fourgurean said.” Read This massive seagrass die-off is the latest sign we’re failing to protect the Everglades

    The News-Press Editorial Board writes – “The truth, when it comes to Florida’s centuries old problem of chewing into the environment, draining the Everglades, killing off sea grass, oyster beds, other marine life, converting wetlands into uplands for development, is difficult to find. What isn’t murky…[is that] we must keep moving forward to a natural flow way to the Everglades. It will take land acquisition, massive re-engineering efforts of an effective water route that incorporates canals, land and a filtering system.” Read Finding the truth in murky water

    Dan Sweeney reports for the Sun Sentinel – “Nearly $1 billion could be headed from Washington to the Everglades under a bill approved by a U.S. Senate panel…Neither senator from Florida is on the committee, but both supported the projects…Sen. Jim Inhofe, the chairman of the Senate’s environment committee, is a climate change denier who takes a dim view of large-scale projects such as Everglades restoration. The Oklahoma Republican was the only senator to vote against the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan when it passed the Senate in 2000. But according to Inhofe, Rubio persuaded him to include the Florida projects in the bill…The bill will still need to be approved in the full U.S. Senate and paired with similar legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives before going to President Barack Obama to be signed into law. With support from Everglades restoration’s biggest critic in the Senate, the chances of passage are good.” Read U.S. Senate panel approves Everglades funding

    Bruce Ritchie reports for Politico Florida – “At its Turkey Point nuclear plant…Florida Power & Light Co. has proposed two nuclear units to match two built in the early 1970s. The state has approved the plans. But the site has come under scrutiny…Now, environmental groups, the Environmental Protection Agency and the city of Miami are using the federal process to raise anew questions about the suitability of the site…[T]he 3rd District Court of Appeal sent the  case back to the Cabinet…” Read Turkey Point canal problems prompt scrutiny of plans for new reactors

    Sue Sturgis reports for Facing South – “Though the Obama administration dropped the Atlantic Ocean from the upcoming five-year plan for offshore drilling earlier this year, plans for seismic testing to map undersea oil and gas reserves are still in place for an area within three miles of the coastline from Delaware to Florida, as none of the companies that have sought seismic permits from the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management have withdrawn their applications…The federal government has acknowledged that seismic blasting in the Atlantic could injure as many as 138,000 dolphins and whales and disturb millions more animals. Now a group of U.S. senators (led by Sen. Cory Booker) has introduced a bill that would put the Atlantic off limits for seismic tests…Booker’s bill has been referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, which is chaired by Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska). The oil and gas industry is the top industrial contributor to Murkowski’s campaign.” Read The ongoing fight over seismic testing for Atlantic oil and gas deposits

    Devin Henry reports for The Hill – “Two Senate Democrats have introduced a bill to create a new climate change adaptation fund to be paid for through new federal bonds…Boxer and Durbin compared the climate change bond program to the war bonds sold by the federal government during the World Wars. Boxer said the bonds would let Americans literally buy into federal climate change work…The fund would tap an expert committee- made up of bipartisan appointments- to vet projects designed to adapt to climate change…Local and state governments would be asked to kick in 25 percent of the cost of their projects in order to receive grants from the fund.” Read Senate Democrats push climate change bond bill

     

     

    From Our Readers

    The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

     



    Job Postings

    The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


    Petitions

    Save the Econlockhatchee River!

    Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

    Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

    Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

    Paynes Prairie in danger

    Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

    Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

     

    Making Connections

    Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

     

    Upcoming Environmental Events

    May 3, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs hydrogeology: the Florida Aquifer, groundwater recharge, and springs flows. For more information, click here.

    May 11, 12:00 pm – Listen to “Ethics in Leadership Development for the Planner,” a 1000 Friends of Florida webinar covering the ethics requirements of the American Institute of Certified planners and how these interface with Florida’s ethics laws. Emphasis will be placed on ethics as it relates to leadership and common ethics traps. For more information and to register, click here.

    May 14, 2:00 pm – Attend “Long Leaf Pine- Restoring Fred George Basin’s ecosystem,” a presentation by Tom Ostertag (FWC Imperiled Species Biologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

    June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

    June 7, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs chemistry: General, nutrients, and trace contaminants. For more information, click here.

     

     

     

     

     

    Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

    We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

    Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

    Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

    If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

    Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition.org

    About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

    For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - May 2, 2016

Posted by Gladys Delgadillo, Monday, May 2nd, 2016 @ 10:23am

  • FCC News Brief

    Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

    May 2, 2016

     

    Bill Geringswald writes for the Orlando Sentinel – “It has been recognized that the Floridan aquifer supplies most of our drinking water. It is also recognized that the displacement of our green spaces by asphalt and concrete jeopardizes the process of recharging the aquifer…Conservation, smart land use (to include land banking) and product waste recycling will be the keys to protect our recharging areas from urban abuse. Plan and build and support green. And we must have the discipline to enact common-sense goals and the commitment to have this happen not just regionally, but statewide.” Read Conserve resources, recycle to protect water supply: My Word

    Skyler Swisher reports for the Sun Sentinel – “A judge dismissed a lawsuit…that sought to block a massive new development for rural western Palm Beach County. Developers say the ruling removes the last obstacle for Minto Communities’ Westlake community…The Palm Beach County judge ruled the development approved by the County Commission in 2014 was consistent with the county’s growth plan. In a statement, John Carter, vice president of Mino communities, said… ‘We intend to pursue sanctions against all plaintiffs in this frivolous case,’…Robert Hartsell, who represented 1000 Friends of Florida…said the case ‘is very appealable.’…The ruling follows another court decision in March that dismissed other arguments against the project. Minto Communities is supporting an incorporation effort for the development.  Only five registered voters live in Seminole Improvement District, which was created to supply water to the 3,800-acre property.” Read Palm Beach County judge dismisses lawsuit seeking to block 4,500-home development

    Steve Patterson reports for The Florida Times Union – “Gov. Rick Scott and the Cabinet approved a plan…to preserve about 5,200 acres of St. Johns County forest that has been farmed as commercial timber for the past century. The decision gave state officials permission to pay the owners about $6 million to sign away development rights on the land through a conservation easement. That would allow the land to still be worked while eliminating chances for construction on the property…The land…is part of a conservation project called the St. Johns River Blueway that has been championed by environmentalists, who cheered the easement. ‘This conservation easement protects Watson Island State Forest, contributes to the economy by providing 130 jobs, and protects land in the northwest corner of the fastest growing county in Florida,’ said Jim McCarthy, executive director of the North Florida Land Trust…” Read Governor, Cabinet OK deal to protect St. Johns timberland

    Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette reports – “Adopting an ordinance mandating bear-proofing techniques in a county’s conflict zone could also mean state assistance. Goode (FWC biologist) said there has been $500,000 appropriated ‘but the kicker is, 60 percent of that money has to go to counties with ordinances.’ Right now, she said, Seminole is the only one in the top 14 to have an ordinance. ‘Seminole County instated their ordinance, and we haven’t set a trap there for a bear. They all moved…,’ Goode said. District 4 Commissioner Rob Williamson…said he would be in favor of an ordinance. Commission Chairman Lane Lynchard directed Attorney Roy Andrews to see how the Seminole County ordinance could be applied in Santa Rosa County.” Read Lock up trash to repel bears, Florida Fish and Wildlife rep says

    Naples Daily News Editorial Board writes – “A welcome chorus of voices may be uniting to take the next logical step in determining the future of hydraulic fracturing in Florida – to hit the pause button and scientifically study the question…We’d see an academic Florida-specific study as preferable to one industry-driven, or led by environmental groups who already are on record with a position, or directed by a state agency that then would be responsible for independently regulating whatever the outcome is...Going forward, we hope to see a stripped-down effort to get money appropriated to get that academic study done..., suspending use of new drilling techniques while oil and gasoline prices are low and domestic production may not be as critical.” Read Voices seem to be uniting when it comes to a Florida study of fracking

    Sun Sentinel Editorial Board writes – “Would Smart Solar be good policy? Should it be in the Constitution? Approval would require 60 percent of voters to say ‘yes.’ It is not at all clear that would be smart.” Read Be skeptical of ‘Smart Solar’ amendment

    Fox 4 reports – “[A] one year old male panther was hit and killed by a car in Hendry County…19 panthers have now been killed this year in Florida. All but two deaths were by vehicle collisions.” Read 2nd Florida panther found dead Tuesday

    Greg Bluestein reports for AJC – “[Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal said]: ‘…We see all these people pontificating about what the governors ought to be doing (regarding the legal feud over water rights with Florida). Especially Sen. Rubio…He seems to forget that his governor, and his state, sued the state of Georgia in the U.S. Supreme Court. And that is an ongoing case and we’re under a gag order not to comment.’ Deal addd: ‘Maybe senators ought to have gag orders as well.’” Read Nathan Deal to Marco Rubio: ‘Maybe senators ought to have gag orders as well’

     

     

    From Our Readers

    The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

     



    Job Postings

    The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

    Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


    Petitions

    Save the Econlockhatchee River!

    Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

    Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

    Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

    Paynes Prairie in danger

    Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

    Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

     

    Making Connections

    Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

     

    Upcoming Environmental Events

    May 3, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs hydrogeology: the Florida Aquifer, groundwater recharge, and springs flows. For more information, click here.

    May 11, 12:00 pm – Listen to “Ethics in Leadership Development for the Planner,” a 1000 Friends of Florida webinar covering the ethics requirements of the American Institute of Certified planners and how these interface with Florida’s ethics laws. Emphasis will be placed on ethics as it relates to leadership and common ethics traps. For more information and to register, click here.

    May 14, 2:00 pm – Attend “Long Leaf Pine- Restoring Fred George Basin’s ecosystem,” a presentation by Tom Ostertag (FWC Imperiled Species Biologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

    May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

    May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

    June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

     

     

     

     

     

    Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

    We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

    Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

    Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

    If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

    Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition.org

    About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

    For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

** The Florida Conservation Coalition has included a “one-click option” to help those who want a convenient way to reach those who need to be contacted, but it is technically impossible to make this function with all email clients. There will also be a downloadable and printable text version that can be copied into your email, but you will have to also place the addresses individually.  We are sorry for the additional time that this second option might require but that is the state of current technology.**


Florida Conservation Coalition

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